Jun 01, 2020  
Spring 2010 Course Catalog 
    
Spring 2010 Course Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 
Students should consult an academic advisor when selecting courses to satisfy program requirements. Program Core Curricula require a combination of specific courses and elective courses. Click for details about how to select course that will Satisfy Core Electives . Click for a listing of the current SUNY General Education Requirements .

 

Communications & Media Arts

  
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    COMM 213A - Communications and Media Arts Internship VIII

    1 credits

    Selected students in the Communications and Media Arts curriculum intern at facilities in the media field (radio stations, television facilities, major corporations, print sites, etc.). Each internship consists of observation and practical, hands-on experience whenever possible. Students are required to keep a daily log of activities (signed by the site supervisor). Four appointments with mentor held on campus each semester. Minimum of 45 hours in the field for 1 credit (3 hrs. per week for 15 weeks). Hours to be determined by the students and the intern company. This course is limited to majors in the Communications and Media Arts curriculum. Students must see Professor William Winters for prior permission and an application in the preceding semester to qualify. Enrollment is limited.
  
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    COMM 214A - Communications and Media Arts Internship IX

    1 credits

    Selected students in the Communications and Media Arts curriculum intern at facilities in the media field (radio stations, television facilities, major corporations, print sites, etc.). Each internship consists of observation and practical, hands-on experience whenever possible. Students are required to keep a daily log of activities (signed by the site supervisor). Four appointments with mentor held on campus each semester. Minimum of 45 hours in the field for 1 credit (3 hrs. per week for 15 weeks). Hours to be determined by the students and the intern company. This course is limited to majors in the Communications and Media Arts curriculum. Students must see Professor William Winters for prior permission and an application in the preceding semester to qualify. Enrollment is limited.Nine separate sections worth one credit each to give both students and the intern sites more flexibility in assigning hours. Students can still take a total of nine credits. While nine credits may be taken, only three may be used to meet the requirement of the major; the other six credits are applied as general elective credits.

Computer Information Systems

  
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    DP 103 - Computer Information Systems

    3 credits

    This foundation course for business students acquaints the student with current computer terminology and applications. Concentration is on learning the standard applications of word processing, spreadsheets, database management, and graphical presentation packages. Additionally, the student becomes familiar with file management, computer hardware and connectivity. The Internet is used as a research and communication tool.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: It is strongly recommended that students with minimal computer experience take OFTEC 110 Keyboarding/Information Processing before this course.
  
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    DP 108A - Object Oriented Programming Logic

    3 credits

    This is an introductory programming course. Visual Basic 2005 is taught, emphasizing the design of Object Oriented, Graphical, and Event-Driven Business Programs. The essential programming concepts are taught, including the use of variables, input, output , mathematical operators, selection structures, repetition structures, built-in functions, user defined functions, arrays, objects and GUI techniques.Class Hours: 4Pre- or Corequisite: DP 103 Computer Information Systems.
  
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    DP 110 - Visual Basic for Business

    3 credits

    This is a second course in programming using Visual Basic 2005. Emphasis is on the object-oriented approach to application development. The full object oriented capabilities of Visual Basic are covered including the use of abstraction, encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism. ADO.NET is used to create applications that connect to SQL Server databases. Web page development using ASP.NET is introduced. The emphasis is on programming business solutions.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: DP 108A Object Oriented Programming Logic.
  
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    DP 112 - PC Hardware

    3 credits

    Students learn the technical skills to diagnose standard computer problems through discussion, group projects, and hands-on experience. Focus is on the support and maintenance of PCs. In a hands-on-environment, students will learn how to upgrade, troubleshoot, and maintain PC hardware, as well as how to build and repair PCs. Troubleshooting techniques necessary to succeed in a computer support position are included. Course learning objectives include standard A+ core requirements.Class Hours: 4Pre- or Corequisite: DP 103 Computer Information Systems.Offered every semester.
  
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    DP 130 - Co-Op Education in CIS I

    3 credits

    Co-op courses are designed to promote career awareness through cooperative work experience in a specific field. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with faculty advisor and written assignments are required.225 work hours required.Prerequisite: Approval of Curriculum Chair; GPA of 2.5 or higher; 9 earned credits in curriculum-required courses and 3 credits in ENG 101 Comp & Lit I or equivalent for total of 12 credits; and a major declared in this specific curriculum. For DP 131, DP 130 is required.
  
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    DP 131 - Co-Op Education in CIS II

    3 credits

    Co-op courses are designed to promote career awareness through cooperative work experience in a specific field. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with faculty advisor and written assignments are required.225 work hours required.Prerequisite: Approval of Curriculum Chair; GPA of 2.5 or higher; 9 earned credits in curriculum-required courses and 3 credits in ENG 101 Comp & Lit I or equivalent for total of 12 credits; and a major declared in this specific curriculum. For DP 131, DP 130 is required.
  
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    DP 210 - Internet Technologies

    3 credits

    This course provides the fundamentals of programming that support a multi-tiered, client/server, database-driven, E-business and E-commerce web site. Technologies that are discussed and applied include xHTML, Dynamic HTML, JavaScript, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), XML, XSL, VBScript, Active Server Pages (ASP), shopping carts, auction sites and security.Class Hours: 4Pre- or Corequisite: DP 235B Networking for Business.
  
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    DP 213 - PC Operating Systems

    3 credits

    This course provides an in-depth study of the Windows Desktop Operating System, and the underlying functions and structure. This knowledge is applied to the installation and configuration of Windows, as well as the troubleshooting and diagnosis of common problems. Students will gain extensive hands-on lab experience in this area and will be prepared to take the Microsoft MCSE exam for Windows.Class Hours: 4Pre- or Corequisite: DP 103 Computer Information Systems.Offered fall and spring.
  
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    DP 214A - Management Information Systems

    3 credits

    This is a management information course for business students, emphasizing the why, the what, and the how of information systems. Topics include: the role of information systems, emerging hardware and software technologies, and the role of the Internet in business. Emphasis is placed on the solution of real world problems faced by managerial end users through the use of advanced spreadsheet design and analysis. Class hrs. 4Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: DP 103 Computer Information Systems.
  
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    DP 214H - Management Information Systems — Honors

    3 credits

    This course supports the five functional areas of business and researches world information management in today’s competitive business environment. Emphasis is placed on the information systems framework of business applications, management challenges, information technologies and the solution to real world problems using case studies, decision making software, collaborative forms of electronic communication, and presentation. This is a HYBRID course. 4 hrs/wk of lecture with integrated computer activities.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: Final grade of B (or higher) in DP 103 Computer Information Systems.
  
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    DP 215B - Systems Analysis and Design

    3 credits

    This course is designed to guide the student through the evolution of a system, an analysis of the present flow of information and the specifications, selection, and implementation of information processing systems. It concentrates on methods, techniques and tools used to determine information requirements and the documentation of these requirements in a thorough and unambiguous form. Traditional systems analysis components are applied to e-Commerce sites. The course uses both DFD and UML to graphically represent systems using a software diagramming package.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: DP 235B Networking for Business.
  
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    DP 220B - Database Management Systems

    3 credits

    Introduction to fundamentals of database management systems, techniques for database design, and principles of database administration. Course emphasizes data modeling (E-R and UML), database design, database application development, and database management. Topics include conceptual models; logical models; normalization; SQL, architectures such as centralized, distributed and client/server; database integrity; database security; error recovery; and concurrency control. Students develop their own individual database applications.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: DP 103 Computer Information Systems.
  
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    DP 235B - Networking for Business

    3 credits

    This is a course on the networking of computers, oriented toward a Network+ certification. Topics that will be explored include protocols, topologies, architecture, routers, hubs, bridges, repeaters, frame relay, packet switching, network topologies, and configurations and troubleshooting.Class Hours: 4Pre- or Corequisite: DP 103 Computer Information Systems or equivalent experience.
  
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    DP 245 - Principles of Security and Forensics (CIS)

    3 credits

    A survey course of both managerial and technical aspects of security. Topics include the legal and professional issues of information security, risk management, firewalls, VPNs, intrusion detection, access control, cryptography, operating system vulnerabilities, file system security, and the basics of computer forensics. Course learning objectives address knowledge areas of CISSP (Certified information Systems Security Professional) core certification requirements.Class Hours: 4Pre- or Corequisite: DP 235B Networking for Business.
  
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    DP 250 - Network Security (CIS)

    3 credits

    This course examines the principles, mechanisms, and implementation of network security and data protection. Students learn about IT industry-wide security topics, including communication security, infrastructure security, cryptography, access control, authentication, external attack, and operational and organization security. The content of this course prepares the student for CompTIA Security+ Certification.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: DP 245 Principles of Security and Forensics.
  
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    DP 255 - Computer Forensics

    3 credits

    This course presents methods to properly conduct a computer forensics investigation, beginning with a discussion of ethics while mapping to the objectives of the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS) certification. Student should have a working knowledge of hardware and operating systems to maximize their success on projects and exercises throughout the course.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: DP 245 Principles of Security and Forensics.

Computer Science

  
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    COMSC 100 - Introduction to Computing Concepts

    3 credits

    This course is designed for students who would like to learn some programming and general knowledge about computers, while exploring options in computer related disciplines. Students learn how to design a web page using HTML and JavaScript, about computer networking and hardware, data resources and retrieval methods, issues in the interaction of computers with society, and computer related curricula and careers.Class Hours: 4Lab Hours: 4
  
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    COMSC 101 - Computer Programming I

    3 credits

    This is an introductory course. Topics include object types, expressions, decision structures, looping structures, methods, parameter passing, and arrays.Some previous computer use (for email, Internet or word processing) is necessary.Class Hours: 4Lab Hours: 4Prerequisite: Students must demonstrate readiness for Analytical Reading and college- level mathematics by attaining appropriate scores on the Placement Exam, or by attaining passing grades in the appropriate developmental courses, or by completion of previous college-level mathematics or English courses.
  
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    COMSC 105 - Computer Architecture I

    3 credits

    This course is the study of computer architecture history; computational machines; basic computer system design; central processor design; gates, Boolean algebra, and Karnaugh maps; combinational circuits, flip-flops, sequential circuits, decoders and multiplexers; decimal, binary, octal, and hexadecimal numbering systems; register transfer language; three-state buffers; ALU operation and implementation; instruction sets; instruction cycle; control logic and current topics in computer architecture.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: Students must demonstrate readiness for Analytical Reading and college-level mathematics by attaining appropriate scores on the Placement Exam, or by attaining passing grades in the appropriate developmental courses, or by completion of previous college-level mathematics or English courses.
  
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    COMSC 106 - IT Essentials I: PC Hardware and Software

    3 credits

    Students learn the functionality of hardware and software components as well as suggested best practices in maintenance and safety issues. The students, through hands-on activities and labs, will learn to assemble and configure a computer, install operating systems and software, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems. In addition, an introduction to networking is included with this course. This course helps students prepare for CompTIA’s A+ certification.Class Hours: 2Lab Hours: 2
  
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    COMSC 108 - .NET GUI Development

    3 credits

    An introductory course in .NET programming concepts for students with some programming experience. Students learn the basic principles of event driven, object-oriented Graphical User Interface (GUI) programming and development. Emphasis is placed on using these concepts to build applications for the Microsoft Windows GUI. Completing this course gives students a solid foundation in the basics of Windows application programming. Topics include: GUI components, event-driven programming, control structures, error handling and debugging, file, array and string processing, GUI program development. May be taken for Honors credit as an Honors Option course.Class Hours: 4Lab Hours: 4Prerequisite: COMSC 101 Computer Programming I.
  
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    COMSC 110 - Computer Programming II

    3 credits

    A continuation of the study of computer programming using object-oriented design. The concepts of modularization, information hiding, abstraction, inheritance, and polymorphism are studied. Students will use libraries, object classes, and be introduced to pointers.Class Hours: 4Lab Hours: 4Prerequisite: COMSC 101 Computer Programming I.
  
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    COMSC 114 - Computer Applications and Telecommunications

    3 credits

    This course is designed to instruct students in basic computer hardware, operating systems, and networking and in the installation and use of software applications in telecommunications. Students use a variety of software packages to create documents, spreadsheets, graphs, and presentations. Students also learn the basics of computer security and maintenance. Both individual and team projects are performed using various software tools to solve complex problems in the workplace.Class Hours: 2Lab Hours: 2
  
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    COMSC 116 - Linux Operating System

    3 credits

    An introduction to the Linux operating system features and functions from four points of view: user, programmer, administrator and designer. Topics are presented in an interactive, hands-on learning environment, enabling students to be productive in Linux immediately upon completion. This course also covers the Linux shell programming language, which enables students to manage repetitive tasks, automatic routing procedures and develop prototypes of application projects.Class Hours: 4Lab Hours: 4Prerequisite: COMSC 101 Computer Programming I.
  
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    COMSC 118 - Networking I

    4 credits

    This course introduces students to the structure of a computer network. They study the OSI model, LAN technologies, TCP/IP, and IP addressing. They acquire the skills to make the necessary cables, install NICs, and to set up and troubleshoot a basic computer network.Class Hours: 3Lab Hours: 2Prerequisite: Students must demonstrate readiness for Analytical Reading and college-level mathematics by attaining appropriate scores on the Placement Exam, or by attaining passing grades in the appropriate developmental courses, or by completion of previous college-level mathematics or English courses. Some previous computer use (for email, Internet or word processing) is necessary.
  
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    COMSC 119 - Assembler Programming



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    COMSC 120 - Internship in Computer Science

    3 credits

    This course is designed to promote career awareness through work experience in the field of Computer Science. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meeting with a faculty advisor and written assignments are required.Prerequisite: COMSC 101 Computer Programming I, one other Computer Science course, ENG 101 Composition & Literature I, and a G.P.A. of 2.5 or higher.
  
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    COMSC 121 - IT Essentials II: NOS

    3 credits

    IT Essentials II: Network Operating Systems is a lab- based course designed to be an overview of network operating systems and specifically covers Linux Red Hat 7.2. The course is an intensive introduction to multi-user, multitasking network operating systems. Characteristics of Linux, Windows 2000, NT and XP network operating systems are discussed. Students explore a variety of topics including installation procedures, security issues, back-up procedures and remote access.Class Hours: 2Lab Hours: 2
  
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    COMSC 123 - Home Technology Integration

    3 credits

    Home Technology Integration (HTI) introduces students to the field of home networking technology. Students are exposed to various residential subsystems including residential networking, lighting, HVAC controls and home security and entertainment systems. Students receive a comprehensive overview of technology integration and automation, including hands-on experience with residential subsystems, structured wiring, systems integration, and an introduction to networking, safety and security. This course prepares students for the CompTIA HTI+ Certified exam.Class Hours: 2Lab Hours: 2Prerequisite: Students must demonstrate readiness for Analytical Reading and college-level mathematics by attaining appropriate scores on the Placement Exam, or by attaining passing grades in the appropriate developmental courses, or by completion of previous college-level mathematics or English courses.
  
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    COMSC 124 - Networking II

    4 credits

    This course builds on the students’ prior knowledge of computer networks. They study the network layer of the OSI model, WAN technologies, TCP/IP, and IP addressing, routers and router programming. They acquire the skills to make a WAN using routers to decrease network traffic and techniques for troubleshooting a computer network.Class Hours: 3Lab Hours: 2Prerequisite: COMSC 118 Networking I.
  
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    COMSC 125 - Computer Architecture II

    3 credits

    This course is the study and use of assembly language and assembler design; micro operations; instruction sets, cycles & accumulator design; control memory, microinstructions & control unit design; internal memory organization, instruction formats, addressing modes and program control; arithmetic logic unit design; and the organization of main, auxiliary, associative and cache memory systems.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: COMSC 105 Computer Architecture I.
  
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    COMSC 128 - Networking III

    4 credits

    This course builds on the students’ prior knowledge of computer networks. They study the details of network design, including: LAN design, LAN switching, VLANs, STP, VTP, DSPF, EIGRP, and classless routing. They acquire the skills to create and maintain small to medium size networks in real-world settings by incorporating their knowledge of WANs, LANs, servers, security, and Internet connectivity.Class Hours: 3Lab Hours: 2Prerequisite: COMSC 124 Networking II.
  
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    COMSC 130 - Voice Over IP

    4 credits

    Voice Over IP introduces students to the new generation of telephone technology. Students learn how IP Telephony operates from a technical perspective. A major part of the course is hands-on training that includes configuring IP phones, IP voice enabled routers, gateways, and call managers. Deployment planning and design strategies are discussed.Class Hours: 3Lab Hours: 3Prerequisite: COMSC 128 Networking III.
  
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    COMSC 132 - Networking IV

    4 credits

    This course builds on the students’ prior knowledge of computer networks. They study the details of network design, including: WANs, WAN design, scaling IP addresses (DHCP and NAT), point-to-point protocol, ISDN, frame-relay and network management. They acquire the skills to create and maintain medium to large size networks in real-world settings by incorporating their knowledge of everything they have learned in the previous networking courses. They are prepared to become certified network administrators.Class Hours: 3Lab Hours: 2Prerequisite: COMSC 128 Networking III.
  
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    COMSC 134 - Network Administration

    3 credits

    Students learn to manage networked applications, configure and manage network printers, configure and manage nodes and clients, establish network policies, expand existing networks, manage remote access, perform routine network maintenance, manage network intranets and extranets, set up and maintain security and define and initiate outsourcing.Class Hours: 2Lab Hours: 2Prerequisite: COMSC 128 Networking III.
  
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    COMSC 136 - Advanced Routing Configuration

    4 credits

    This course focuses on advanced routing and using routers connected in local-area networks (LANs) and wide-area networks (WANs) typically found at medium to large network sites. Upon completion of this course, the student is able to select and implement the appropriate Cisco IOS services required to build a scalable routed network. Students are prepared for the Building Scalable Cisco Internetworks (BSCI) Exam (640-901) of the CCNP, CCIP, CCDP and CCIE certifications.Class Hours: 3Lab Hours: 2Prerequisite: COMSC 132 Networking IV or CCNA certification.
  
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    COMSC 138 - Remote Access

    4 credits

    Remote Access focuses on the proper selection and implementation of the services required to build remote access links. Students develop skills related to analog dialup, ISDN, Frame Relay, broadband, and VPNs. This hands-on, lab-oriented course stresses the design, implementation, operation, and Level 1 troubleshooting of common WAN connectivity options. Students are prepared for the Building Scalable Cisco Remote Access Networks (BCRAN) exam 642-824.Class Hours: 3Lab Hours: 3Prerequisite: COMSC 132 Networking IV or CCNA certification.
  
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    COMSC 142 - Network Security (CS)

    4 credits

    Network Security introduces students to the principles and industry applications of designing and maintaining a secure network. Topics include firewalls, encryption algorithms, authentication, remote access, data integrity and secure communications, network security management and policies. The laboratory component includes secure router and firewall design, installation, configuration and maintenance, authentication methods and virtual private networks. Preparation for industry security certifications include MCNS, CSPFA, Security+, CSSP.Class Hours: 3Lab Hours: 3Prerequisite: COMSC 132 Networking IV.
  
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    COMSC 145 - Intro to Computer Forensics

    3 credits

    This course takes a detailed, hands-on approach to the investigation of criminal incidents in which computers or computer technology play an important or interesting role. At the completion of this course, students will be familiar with the core computer science theory and practical skills necessary to perform rudimentary computer forensic investigations. The course widens their computer knowledge by using specialized software and hardware equipment, helps them to understand the role of technology in investigating computer-based crimes, and prepares students to deal with investigative bodies at a fundamental level.Class Hours: 2Lab Hours: 2Prerequisite: Students must demonstrate readiness for Analytical Reading and college-level mathematics by attaining appropriate scores on the Placement Exam, or by attaining passing grades in the appropriate developmental courses, or by completion of previous college-level mathematics or English courses. Some previous computer use (for email, Internet or word-processing) is necessary.
  
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    COMSC 201A - Data Structures

    4 credits

    An overall view of algorithmic methods. Commonly used data structures are examined. These include classes, lists, tables, stacks, queues, trees and graphs. Various methods of storage allocation, searching and sorting techniques are discussed. Practical experience is acquired through programming assignments. May be taken for Honors credit as an Honors Option course.Lecture hrs. 4.Prerequisite: COMSC 110 Computer Programming II.
  
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    COMSC 202 - Operating Systems



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    COMSC 207 - Java Application Development

    3 credits

    This is an upper-level programming class which concentrates on software engineering and object-oriented programming using Java to create computer graphics and GUI applications. Topics include graphic objects, drawing shapes, images, recursive graphics, applets, GUI components—such as buttons, combo boxes, containers, dialog boxes, layout managers, and file and color choosers—mouse and key event-driven applications, and GUI design.Class Hours: 4Lab Hours: 4Prerequisite: COMSC 110 Computer Programming II.
  
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    COMSC 208A - Advanced .NET Development

    4 credits

    This is an advanced course in .NET program development and software engineering practices. Students learn how to create databases, develop database applications and data-driven web applications. Topics include: SQL Server databases, ADO .NET data objects, database controls, web applications using forms and databases with ASP .NET.Lecture hrs. 4.Prerequisite: COMSC 108 .NET GUI Development.
  
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    COMSC 212A - Advanced Java

    4 credits

    This is a course in advanced Java programming techniques. The topics covered include: recursion, threads, file processing, data structures, multimedia applications, database applications, servlets and JSP, Java Beans, networking, and advanced program development.Lecture hrs. 4.Prerequisite: COMSC 207 Java Application Development
  
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    COMSC 214A - Web Programming

    4 credits

    This course teaches students how to plan, build, and maintain dynamic web sites and how to create effective web site architecture, layout, and navigational features. Students work on individual web sites and collaborate a team web site project. Web programming languages to be used can include XHTML, JavaScript, XML, AJAX Technologies, Perl, Ruby Rails, and PHP. Web site development tools such as Flash and Dreamweaver may be used in simple and advanced web site development. 4.Lecture hrs.Prerequisite: COMSC 110 Computer Programming II.

Criminal Justice

  
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    CHEM 128A - Introduction to Criminalistics

    4 credits

    Criminalistics is the application of science to the examination of physical evidence obtained in the investigation of a crime. Both the lecture and laboratory emphasize the role of forensic science within the criminal justice system. Lecture topics include the crime scene, collection of physical evidence, fingerprints, firearms, and serology. Where possible, guest lectures by trained in-service personnel (local police, firefighters) supplement the class. The lab experience covers areas of forensics such as fingerprints, microscopes, serology, and spectroscopy as well as in basic laboratory techniques. The course includes a field trip to a local forensic science laboratory.
  
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    PSCJ 101 - Intro to the Criminal Justice System in the U.S.

    3 credits

    This course examines the criminal justice system in the United States. The course includes an analysis of the three main sub-components; police, courts and corrections and how each accomplishes its goals within the criminal justice process.Class Hours: 3Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSCJ 102 - Basic Laws and Principals

    5 credits

    This course includes an in-depth analysis of procedural due process as it applies to the duties and responsibilities of a police officer in New York State. Topics studied include arrest powers; stop question and frisk; search and seizure; civil liability; penal law; criminal procedure law; environmental conservation law; election law; Family Court Act; vehicle and traffic law; interrogation; and eyewitness identification.Offered at the Police Academy and limited to sworn, full-time Police and Correctional Officers.Class Hours: 5Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    PSCJ 104 - Emergency Medical Care

    2 credits

    This course is designed to give NY State Certification in the areas of CPR-Basic Life Support and Certified First Responder as they apply to the duties of a law enforcement or corrections officer in New York State.It is offered at the Police Academy and limited to sworn, full-time Police and Correctional Officers.Class Hours: 2Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSCJ 106 - Criminal Investigations

    3 credits

    This course includes an in-depth analysis of criminal investigation as it applies to the duties and responsibilities of a police officer in New York State. Included are the specific topics of preliminary investigation and informant development; interviewing and interrogation; physical evidence; injury and death cases; larceny and theft cases; auto theft cases; bomb and bomb threat cases; organized crime cases; the crimes of burglary, robbery, arson; and sex crimes.Offered at the Police Academy and limited to sworn, full-time Police and Correctional Officers.Class Hours: 3Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSCJ 108 - Administration of Justice

    2 credits

    This course includes an in-depth analysis of the administration of justice as it applies to the duties and responsibilities of a police officer. Included are a historical perspective on law enforcement and an overview of: the criminal justice system, responsibilities and jurisdictions of law enforcement, the court structure of the criminal justice system, fingerprinting and booking procedures, observation and patrol, police communications, and crimes-in- progress calls.Offered at the Police Academy and limited to sworn, full-time Police and Correctional Officers.Class Hours: 2Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSCJ 110 - Police Arrest Techniques

    2 credits

    This course is centered on the mechanics of arrest; prisoner search, building search; transportation of prisoners; description and practice in the fundamental use of the police baton, methods of disarming, and protection against persons armed with deadly or dangerous weapons; demonstration and drill in a limited number of holds; “come-alongs,” handcuffing, and restraint of prisoners and the mentally ill will be provided. Sessions also include physical agility exercises designed to improve strength and endurance.Offered at the Police Academy and limited to sworn, full-time Police and Correctional Officers.Class Hours: 2Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSCJ 111 - Introduction to Criminology

    3 credits

    An introduction to the scientific study of the causes and prevention of crime. The course examines criminal behavior and the theories of crime causation.Class Hours: 3Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSCJ 112 - Traffic Control Function

    4 credits

    This course includes an in-depth analysis of duties and procedures as they apply to the traffic control function responsibilities of a police officer in New York State. Topics included are: police radar, traffic control and direction, traffic enforcement, impaired driving, vehicle pullovers, accident investigation, hazardous materials and EVOC (Emergency Vehicle Operation Course). A practicum is included in the areas of police radar, vehicle pullovers, accident investigation and EVOC.Offered at the Police Academy and limited to sworn Police and Correctional Officers.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSCJ 120 - Global Terrorism

    3 credits

    This course is designed to present an integrated approach to the concept of domestic and international terrorist tactics. The course presents the various perspectives that have given rise to the use of terrorism in modern society. Various domestic groups and international organizations are presented. Counter-terrorism tactics employed by the military as well as state and federal law enforcement are discussed.
  
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    PSCJ 130H - Comparative Criminal Justice - Honors

    3 credits

    This course will provide an in-depth examination of criminal justice systems from a global perspective. It will describe and compare the criminal justice systems of multiple model nations, including their legal system, law enforcement, courts and corrective processes. The roles of religion, politics, economics and national history will be analyzed in regard to their contribution to each nation’s criminal justice system.Class Hours: 3Prerequisite: ENG 101 Composition and Literature, PSCJ 101 Intro to the Criminal Justice System in the U.S. (or permission of Instructor), and permission of Honors Program.
  
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    PSCJ 202 - Juvenile Delinquency - Treatment and Control

    3 credits

    This course explores the nature and causes of juvenile delinquency and the current methods of dealing with this problem. The course examines juvenile delinquency as a historical phenomenon and analyzes the various approaches used to correct the wayward juvenile. The role of the family, the school, the community and the criminal justice system are examined.Class Hours: 3Offered spring semester.
  
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    PSCJ 221 - Criminal Justice Seminar

    3 credits

    A capstone course for advanced students who study the analysis and solutions of typical criminal justice problems. Extensive library work is required, along with independent study of various problems.Class Hours: 3Prerequisite: Students must have first completed 45 credits in the Criminal Justice curriculum, and successfully completed PSCJ 101 and PSCJ 111 or have the permission of the Curriculum or Department Chairperson.
  
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    PSCJ 230 - Criminal Justice Internship I

    3 credits

    This course consists of a pre-service fieldwork experience supervised by the faculty in close cooperation with a supervisor of a criminal justice agency. The course is individually designed to afford the student the maximum theoretical and pragmatic experience. A weekly meeting with the faculty supervisor as well as 120 hours of fieldwork are required.Permission of the Curriculum or Department Chairperson is required. Students must have 40 credits.
  
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    PSCJ 235 - Criminal Justice Internship II

    3 credits

    This course is an extension of Criminal Justice Internship I. The course’s content is individually designed by the faculty advisor and the assigned agency’s fieldwork supervisor to fill voids in the student’s experiential background to give the student a realistic perspective of the duties, responsibilities and authority of the supervising agency prior to entering the law enforcement field. 120 hours of supervisory field work and a weekly meeting with the faculty advisor is required to integrate the fieldwork experience with the student’s academic experience.Permission of Curriculum or Department Chairperson is required.
  
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    PSCOR 103B - Introduction to Corrections

    3 credits

    This course is a survey of the theories and practices of penology in correctional and reformatory institutions. The physical, educational, and social aspects of incarceration are studied with respect to their impact on the rehabilitative prospects of inmates. The concepts of probation and parole as alternatives to imprisonment are also examined.Class Hours: 3Offered fall semester.
  
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    PSCOR 111 - Institutional Treatment of the Criminal and Delinquent

    3 credits

    The history, purpose, make-up, and programs of reformatories and prisons are studied. New concepts of institutional treatment, methods of discipline procedure, present-day institutions, study of the criminal and criminal personality; orientation of the inmate are also presented for analysis and examination.Class Hours: 3Offered spring semester.
  
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    PSCOR 121 - Probation and Parole

    3 credits

    This course provides an examination of probation and parole as alternatives to incarceration within the criminal justice system. Particular consideration is devoted to the rationale, evolution, and functioning of community-based corrections.Class Hours: 3Offered fall semester.
  
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    PSCOR 125 - Critical Issues in Corrections

    3 credits

    Critical issues in the field of corrections are examined in this course. Topics include violence, correctional staff, overcrowding, legal issues, treatment methods, special inmates, AIDS, juvenile offenders, and institutional life.Class Hours: 3Offered spring semester.
  
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    PSPOL 111 - Introduction to Substantive Criminal Law

    3 credits

    Consideration of law as a function of our culture with particular emphasis on the origin and history of law, codes, common and statutory law, and the establishment of a government under law is examined. Definitions of crimes and classifications of offenses are considered, along with the basic principles and concepts of law. Case studies of crimes in selected categories are considered for analysis.Class Hours: 3Offered fall semester.
  
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    PSPOL 120 - Police Organization and Management

    3 credits

    This course examines the relationship of management functions (i.e., planning, organizing, staffing, direction, and controlling) to the organization and administration of an effective police agency. Students are involved in analysis of management functions as they relate to the criminal justice system. Classical and contemporary organizational models, as well as typical administrative procedures, control processes, and resource utilization are studied. Specific topics include administrative procedures, legal authority, labor relations, motivational challenges, communication systems, and management strategies.Lecture hrs. 3Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSPOL 201 - Police-Community Relations

    3 credits

    The study of the complex and sensitive issues involved in the relationship between the police and the community they serve. Various attitudes and beliefs which affect police-community relations are examined. Methods and programs designed to improve that relationship are explored and evaluated.Class Hours: 3Offered fall semester.
  
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    PSPOL 203 - Principles of Investigation

    3 credits

    An introduction to the field of criminal investigation which includes the history of the evolution of scientific investigation, the development of legal proscriptions, and the methodologies of detection, identification, and apprehension of criminal offenders.Class Hours: 3Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSPOL 205 - Survey of Organized Crime

    3 credits

    A survey course examining organized crime and its role in contemporary American society. Attention is focused on the origins, organization, membership, and functions of the criminal cartel. The control of organized crime within the criminal justice system is also investigated.Class Hours: 3Offered spring semester.
  
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    PSPOL 210 - Supervision and Management of Police

    5 credits

    This course examines a number of issues relating to the supervision and management of police within the context of a multicultural/multi-ethnic society. The issues studied include the basic supervisory responsibilities of a supervisor in law enforcement, the concepts and inter-relationships of basic organizational structures, leadership styles, terms and concepts associated with police supervision, supervisor influence on employee performance, barriers to effective communication, employee counseling, and interview in a police setting.Class Hours: 5Offered twice a year at the Police Academy to full-time police officers only.
  
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    PSPOL 211 - Basic Criminal Law and Procedure

    3 credits

    An examination of the principles of American criminal procedure. This course includes an in-depth analysis of procedural due process as applied to police work, including the areas of arrest, search and seizure, interrogation, and the decisions that have to be made while dealing with constitutional guarantees provided to persons accused of crime.Class Hours: 3Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSPOL 212 - Police Supervision

    3 credits

    This course examines the fundamentals of supervision as applied to police operations, including techniques to provide effective leadership, discipline, training, and communications within the supervisor’s area of responsibility.Class Hours: 3Prerequisite: PSPOL 120 Police Organization and Management.Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    PSPOL 213 - Police Instructor Development

    3 credits

    This course is an intensive program to prepare an active police/peace officer for instructional duties. This course includes development of the necessary skills and instructional methods for the successful police trainer. The student is required to prepare and present instructional material to the class.Offered at the Police Academy (to full-time police officers).Class Hours: 3
  
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    PSSEC 111 - Introduction to Security

    3 credits

    The historic, philosophical, practical, and legal basis of security are investigated. The role of security individual security in our modern society, the concept of professionalism and the relationship to public law are presented for analysis. Personnel, physical and administrative aspects of security are also examined.Class Hours: 3Offered fall semester.

Dance

  
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    DANCE 101 - Elementary Modern Dance I

    3 humanities OR 2 humanities and 1 physical education fitness credits

    Designed to develop students’ awareness of the basic concepts and vocabulary of modern dance as a basis for the appreciation of modern dance, for aesthetic satisfaction, for physical well-being, and for performance. During the course, students learn basic locomotive and non-locomotive steps and combinations. They also become familiar with the philosophical and artistic contributions of the forerunners and pioneers of modern dance. There are some written, reading, and dance assignments. Students learn and perform a short modern dance with other members of the class.Class Hours: 4Offered fall and spring semesters, day and evening sections.
  
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    DANCE 102 - Elementary Modern Dance II

    3 humanities OR 2 humanities and 1 physical education fitness credits

    A continuation of Elementary Modern Dance I. Basic concepts and movement vocabulary are reviewed, and students then continue to strengthen technique and aesthetic awareness by introduction of new and more demanding movement patterns, improvisations, and movement assignments paced and geared to the Elementary II level. There are some writing, reading, and dance assignments. Elementary II students study the philosophical and artistic combinations of the second generation and the avant-garde.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: DANCE 101 Elementary Modern Dance I or the equivalent or permission of the instructor.Offered fall and spring semesters, evenings only.
  
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    DANCE 105 - Dance & Movement Education

    1 humanities OR 1 physical education fitness credits

    Focuses on dance and movement as tools for group activities within educational, therapeutic or recreational situations. In a creative way, students explore the applied use of the elements of movement and dance in order to enhance individual growth and group cohesiveness through non-threatening, non- technical, and playful experiences. Students learn and perform a short portion of class work.Offered fall semester.
  
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    DANCE 107 - Elementary Ballet

    3 humanities OR 2 humanities and 1 physical education fitness credits

    Movement experiences presenting the fundamentals of classical ballet in order to develop understanding of and skills in the basic ballet vocabulary. Includes an overview of ballet history and a written and/or dance assignment. Students learn and perform a short ballet dance with other members of the class.Offered fall semester.
  
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    DANCE 109 - Ballet Workshop

    1 health/fitness credits

  
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    DANCE 110 - Dance Workshop

    1 health/fitness credits

  
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    DANCE 112 - Intro to Merengue and Salsa

    1 humanities OR 1 physical education fitness credits

    This course teaches the fundamentals of movement and social dancing principals. The primary focus is on learning basic steps and partnering. Students will also learn about the history of these two dance forms. The entire class will perform a dance using the steps and movements learned during the semester. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort and progress assessed through written and reading assignments, written and practical quizzes, in-class participation and the final performance.Class Hours: 2Offered spring semester
  
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    DANCE 120 - Jazz/Music Theatre Dance

    1 humanities OR 1 physical education fitness credits

    This course provides dance experiences for students interested in dance and/or theatre by developing the students’ awareness of basic principles of movement, beginning jazz dance technique, and the jazz idiom as part of musical theatre productions. The course includes a brief outline of the history of jazz dance and its role in musical theatre and film. Students learn and perform a jazz dance. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort, progress, assignments, and exams.Class Hours: 2Offered spring and fall semesters and Summer Session I.
  
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    DANCE 121 - Elementary Jazz Dance

    3 humanities OR 2 humanities and 1 physical education fitness credits

    Provides many dance experiences to develop students’ awareness of basic principles of movement and to teach beginning skills in the jazz idiom. Also includes an overview of jazz dance history and some writing, reading and dance assignments. The class learns and performs a jazz dance.Class Hours: 4Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
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    DANCE 131 - Jazz Dance Workshop

    1 physical education fitness credits

    A continuation of Elementary Jazz Dance I. Basic principles of movement and jazz techniques and steps are reviewed. Students then continue to strengthen their techniques and aesthetic awareness by introduction of many new and more demanding combinations and movement assignments geared to an advanced beginning level. There are some written, reading, and dance assignments. The class learns and performs a jazz dance.Prerequisite: DANCE 121 Elementary Jazz Dance I or previous formal training in dance, modern jazz or ballet.Offered spring semester.
  
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    DANCE 205 - Choreography and Dance Performance

    3 humanities OR 2 humanities and 1 physical education fitness credits

    Provides training in basic choreographic skills. Working in both traditional and non-traditional ways, students concentrate on the development of original forms and structures and learn the art of making their own dances.Class Hours: 4Prerequisite: Students must have previous technical training in dance.Offered spring semester.
  
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    DANCE 207 - Independent Study in Dance Performance

    3 humanities OR 2 humanities and 1 physical education fitness credits

    Students rehearse and perform a minimum of two dances as part of DanceWorks, the college dance company, and attend company classes. Involves a yearlong commitment to rehearsals, Saturday classes, and all performances. Open by audition, permission of the company director and dance faculty consultant, as well as enrollment in or successful completion of Westchester Community College dance courses at appropriate level.Registration may be in fall or spring, but work must span both semesters.
  
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    PEH 123 - Intro to Merengue and Salsa

    1 humanities OR 1 physical education fitness credits

    This course teaches the fundamentals of movement and social dancing principals. The primary focus is on learning basic steps and partnering. Students will also learn about the history of these two dance forms. The entire class will perform a dance using the steps and movements learned during the semester. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort and progress assessed through written and reading assignments, written and practical quizzes, in-class participation and the final performance.Class Hours: 2Offered spring semester
  
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    PEH 146 - Jazz Aerobics

    1 physical education fitness credits

    Exercise course which includes warm-up and stretches leading to a non-impact aerobic workout in the jazz dance style followed by a cool-down and relaxation period. Students learn and apply the principles of aerobic exercise. They learn and demonstrate a short portion of the class work.Offered fall semester.
  
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    PEH 176 - Dance & Movement Education

    1 humanities OR 1 physical education fitness credits

    Focuses on dance and movement as tools for group activities within educational, therapeutic or recreational situations. In a creative way, students explore the applied use of the elements of movement and dance in order to enhance individual growth and group cohesiveness through non-threatening, non- technical, and playful experiences. Students learn and perform a short portion of class work.Offered fall semester.

E.M.T. - Paramedic

  
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    EMS 101 - Emergency Medical Services I

    5 credits

    This course introduces the student to EMS systems, basic human topographical anatomy, basic life support (CPR) as well as assessment and various treatment modalities for medical and traumatic emergencies. Also required are 16 hours of pre-hospital field experience. Upon successful completion of all course work, and practical skills examination, students are eligible to take the New York State Department of Health certification exam for EMT-B.Permission of EMS Academy to register.Class Hours: 4.5Lab Hours: 3Prerequisite: A student enrolled in EMS must be 18 years of age by the last day of the month in which he/she is scheduled to take the written certification exam.
  
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    EMS 102 - EMS First Responder

    3 credits

    This course introduces students to the basics of prehospital emergency care. Students will learn the skills necessary to begin assessing and caring for patients at the scene of injury or illness. The course will follow the NYS Department of Health, Bureau of EMS guidelines for certification as a Certified First Responder. Students successfully completing this course will be eligible for the NYS Practical Skills exam and NYS written certification exam for Certified First Responder.Class Hours: 3Lab Hours: 1
  
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    EMS 110 - Disaster Preparedness

    3 credits

    This course exposes the student to the principles of disaster preparation and coordination. A presentation of the problems facing EMS personnel are explored through an interdisciplinary approach to the various aspects of disaster response and management. The student gains a better understanding of an EMS disaster as an EMS specialist. In addition, the importance that society places on disasters, whether peacetime, natural, or technological are explored. A global comparison identifies the impact of disasters on different cultures, styles of governments, and the different approaches to disaster management.Class Hours: 3Prerequisite: EMS 101 Emergency Medical Services I.Offered spring semester.
  
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    EMS 121 - Paramedic I, Lab and Clinical Studies

    6 credits

    An introduction to advanced pre-hospital emergency and the skills of the paramedic. Classroom and lab sessions, include topics in Roles and Responsibilities of the Paramedic, EMS Systems, Stress Management, Medical terminology, Patient Assessment, Pathophysiology of shock, and General Pharmacology. A clinical component to this course allows the student to interact with patients in the field setting. This course follows the suggested guidelines of Division 1 and Division 2 of the U.S. Department of Transportation, National Standard Curriculum for Paramedic.Class Hours: 6Lab Hours: 2Clinical hrs. 10Prerequisite: BIOL 121,123 Anatomy & Physiology I & II.Corequisite: EMS 122 Paramedic II.Offered fall semester.
  
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    EMS 122 - Paramedic II, Lab and Clinical Studies

    3 credits

    This course provides the student with the ability to assess and manage in the pre-hospital setting a wide variety of traumatic injuries to the human body. The assessment and treatment of burns are presented. In addition to the lecture component of this course, students participate in lab sessions that develop the advanced skills necessary to operate affectively in the prehospital setting as a paramedic. A clinical component to this course allows the paramedic student to interact with patients in the field setting. This course follows the suggested guidelines of Division 3 the U.S. Department of Transportation National Standard Curriculum for Paramedic.Class Hours: 10Clinical hrs. 10.Prerequisite: BIOL 121, 123 Anatomy & Physiology I & II.Corequisite: EMS 121 Paramedic I.Offered fall semester.
  
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    EMS 130 - Prehospital Pharmacology

    3 credits

    This course introduces the EMS professional to basic pharmacology including pharmacokinetics and pharmaocdynamics, with an emphasis on the prehospital setting. The course presents a variety of medications according to their therapeutic application. Pertinent physiology and related diseases are also presented along with appropriate medications. Pharmacology is approached by body system (nervous system, respiratory system, cardiac system, etc.) so that the therapeutic action of drugs may be clearly understood.Class Hours: 3Corequisite: EMS 121, 122 Paramedic I & II.
  
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    EMS 135 - Introduction to EMS Research

    3 credits

    This class helps students understand the importance of EMS research in today’s EMS Systems. Students learn the research process, as well as how to design a study, ethical considerations, and how to implement a research project and collect data. This course is designed for the EMS professional, whether a field provider, educator, or administrator. Research has always been essential in scientific documentation. Students learn a true appreciation of the importance of the EMS research process?from design through implementation.Class Hours: 3Prerequisite: EMS Certification (EMT-Basic or EMT Paramedic)
  
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    EMS 210 - Comparative EMS Systems

    4 credits

    This course examines various components of an EMS system by comparing existing systems nationwide. Each system is examined for its strengths and weaknesses in comparison with local systems. Students are encouraged to identify problems in their local systems and formulate solutions to current and anticipated shortcomings. Upon completion, students have a thorough understanding of an effective EMS system and their role in it.Class Hours: 4Offered fall semester.
  
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    EMS 215 - EMS Administration and Leadership

    3 credits

    This course introduces the EMS professional to issues in prehospital care administration. Students explore issues in culture and human resources, EMS operations, financial issues as well as the changing clinical environment and EMS system design. EMS students gain insights into the field of EMS through discussion, readings and case studies.Class Hours: 3Prerequisite: EMS 101 Emergency Medical Services I or permission from department chair.
 

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