May 30, 2024  
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog 
    
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Students should consult with their curriculum chair or counselor when selecting courses to satisfy program requirements. Please note: The honors versions of courses satisfy the same requirements as the non-honors versions.

 

Marketing

  
  • MKT 130 - Co-op Education in Marketing 1

    3 credits

    Co-op courses are designed to promote career awareness through cooperative work experience in a specific field. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with faculty advisor and written assignments are required

    Notes: 225 work hours required.

    Prerequisites: Approval of Curriculum or Department Chair; GPA of 2.5 or higher; 9 earned credits in curriculum-required courses and 3 credits in ENG 101 - Writing and Research  or equivalent for a total of 12 credits; and a major declared in this specific curriculum.
  
  • MKT 131 - Co-op Education in Marketing 2

    3 credits

    Co-op courses are designed to promote career awareness through cooperative work experience in a specific field. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with faculty advisor and written assignments are required.

    Notes: MKT 130 is required. 225 work hours required.

    Prerequisites: Approval of Curriculum or Department Chair; GPA of 2.5 or higher; 9 earned credits in curriculum-required courses and 3 credits in ENG 101 - Writing and Research  or equivalent for a total of 12 credits; and a major declared in this specific curriculum.
  
  • MKT 202 - Digital Marketing

    3 credits

    An introductory course in online and social media marketing. Students apply popular web-based data analysis and promotion, and online marketing strategies for customer acquisition and retention. Includes business models used for internet marketing and techniques for online market research and social media marketing strategies based on the marketing mix.

    Notes: Only offered online. This course was formerly titled Internet Marketing.

  
  • MKT 203 - Advertising

    3 credits

    This course studies the role of advertising as a component of consumer marketing. Students will create media and public relation plans, advertising campaigns, and learn about the role of the advertising agency and client relationships. Students are required to track creative work and submit a media plan and portfolio of creative ideas and media selection in advertising communication.

    Prerequisites: MKT 101 Marketing .
  
  • MKT 203H - Advertising - Honors

    4 credits

    Development and social importance of advertising; economic and legal aspects; psychology of advertising; the advertising agency and how it works; the advertising manager; major media: newspapers, magazines, radio and television; types of copy; advertising campaigns, research pertinent to advertising effectiveness; analysis of topography media, production, and appropriateness of advertising.

    Prerequisites: MKT 101 Marketing  or permission from the Curriculum or Department Chairperson.
  
  • MKT 205 - Market Research

    3 credits

    This fundamentals of marketing research course will teach students how to implement research design techniques using various industry standard software applications, methods of marketing research, tools to solve real-life business market research problems with both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Instructional methods include lectures, individual homework assignments and a real-life marketing research project.

    Prerequisites: MKT 101 - Marketing  and MATH 140 - Statistics .
  
  • MKT 207 - Consumer Behavior

    3 credits

    Examines how and why people behave as buyers. Students learn how to analyze buyer behavior, consumer motivation, perception, attitudes, and influences, market segmentation, and the decision-making process. Students will use qualitative methods like focus groups and groupthink projects to evaluate innovative ideas as part of marketing segmentation.

    Corequisite: MKT 101 Marketing .
    Prerequisites: MKT 101 Marketing .
  
  • MKT 216 - Marketing Management

    3 credits

    Capstone course in Marketing curriculum. Students will analyze managerial decision-making for branding and product innovation. Topics include marketing strategy determination, the role of marketing research, consumer behavior, marketing and the law, consumerism, social responsibility of marketers, international marketing & produce, pricing, distribution and channel policy. A special focus on analytical techniques in developing, implementing and controlling new product development marketing plans is provided.

    Prerequisites: MKT 203 - Advertising  and MKT 207 - Consumer Behavior  
    Pre or Corequisites: MKT 203 - Advertising  and MKT 207 - Consumer Behavior  

  
  • MKT 225 - Global Marketing

    3 credits

    This course will equip students with the analytical tools, research skills, and terminology involved in developing a global mindset. Students will analyze the related cultural, social, economic, political, and legal considerations; they will develop analytical frameworks crucial for managerial decision-making; and they will conduct in-depth research into a specific non-Western or emerging economy and develop a comprehensive strategic marketing plan to expand into that market.

    Pre or Corequisites: MGT 215 - Global Business  

  
  • MKT 239 - Market Internship

    3 credits

    This work-based internship course is designed to promote career awareness and skill readiness through onsite, managed work arrangements. Students will integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with faculty advisor and written assignments are required. Permission of Marketing Curriculum Chairperson is required.

    Prerequisites: MKT 101 - Marketing . Required: Cumulative GPA of 2.5 or higher, min. of 24 completed credits, ability to work 180 hours/semester, job readiness interview, approval of Chairperson. 

Mathematics

  
  • MATH 88 - Foundations of Quantitative Reasoning Studio

    0 credits

    This is a 0-credit course to enforce foundational skills needed for a linked section of MATH 117 College Quantitative Reasoning ; offering students additional instruction, peer interaction, and time-on-task in an active, workshop-based environment. Additional instruction, activities, and assessments support students’ work in Math 117 and include: instructor and peer conferencing, math skills instruction, and discussions of how to succeed in MATH 117 College Quantitative Reasoning .

    Notes: This is a Pass/Fail course

    Corequisite: MATH 117 College Quantitative Reasoning  
    Prerequisites: Appropriate placement test score
  
  • MATH 89 - Mathematical Reasoning Studio

    0 credits

    This is a 0-credit course that supports a linked section of MATH 94 ; offering students additional instruction, peer interaction, and time-on-task in an active, workshop-based environment.  Additional instruction, activities, and assessments support students’ work in MATH 94  and include: instructor and peer conferencing, math skills instruction, and discussions of how to succeed in MATH 94 .

    Corequisite: MATH 94 - Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning  
  
  • MATH 92 - Prealgebra

    0 credits

    A developmental mathematics course designed to reinforce arithmetic concepts and help the student make the transition from arithmetic to algebra. Topics include: whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percent, ratios and proportions, measurement, integers, introductory algebraic concepts, and solving equations.

    Notes: Students must pass a departmental competency final assessment in order to complete course requirements.

  
  • MATH 93 - Beginning Algebra

    0 credits

    A developmental mathematics course designed to introduce the fundamental concepts of algebra.  Topics include: solving linear equations and inequalities, graphing linear equations, rates, slopes of lines, systems of linear equations, integer exponents, operations on polynomials, simplifying radical expressions, factoring, solving quadratic equations, and simplifying rational expressions.  Students must pass a departmental competency final assessment in order to complete course requirements. 

    Notes: Students must pass a departmental competency final assessment in order to complete course requirements. Tuition for this course is charged as 4 hours.

    Prerequisites:

    Successful completion of prerequisite course MATH 92 Prealgebra  or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 480; or ACT Math ≥ 18; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, OR Geometry) score ≥ 65

  
  • MATH 94 - Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning

    0 credits

    This course helps students to use numbers to understand the world around us, to reason using ratios and proportions, and to perform basic algebraic steps to use and solve formulas and to model real life situations. All problems are based on real and interesting situations that students may meet in their lives and in their other college courses.

    The course prepares students to take a college-level, not-STEM course in mathematics, such as MATH 116 The Development of Mathematical Thought , MATH 117 College Quantitative Reasoning , or MATH 123 Math for Elementary School Teachers .

    Notes:

    This course is NOT sufficient preparation for MATH 130 College Algebra: Functions & Models  or MATH 135 College Algebra with Trigonometry . Students in curricula which require MATH 130 College Algebra: Functions & Models  or MATH 135 College Algebra with Trigonometry , or courses for which they are prerequisites, should not enroll in this course.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 92 - Prealgebra ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 480; or ACT Math ≥ 18; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, OR Geometry) score ≥ 65

  
  • MATH 95 - Statistics Studio

    0 credits

    This is a 0-credit course that supports a linked section of MATH 140 Statistics ; offering students additional instruction, peer interaction, and time-on-task in an active, workshop-based environment. Additional instruction, activities, and assessments support students’ work in Math 140 and include: instructor and peer conferencing, math skills instruction, and discussions of how to succeed in MATH 140 Statistics .

    Notes: This is a Pass/Fail course.

    Corequisite: MATH 140 Statistics  
    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 92 Prealgebra ; or course placement; or SAT MATH ≥ 480; or ACT MATH ≥ 18; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2 or Geometry) score ≥ 65
  
  • MATH 99 - Quantitative Reasoning Studio

    0 credits

    This is a 0-credit course that supports a linked section of MATH 117 ; offering students additional instruction, peer interaction, and time-on-task in an active, workshop-based environment. Additional instruction, activities, and assessments support students’ work in MATH 117  and include: instructor and peer conferencing, math skills instruction, and discussions of how to succeed in MATH 117 .

    Notes: This is a Pass/Fail course.

    Corequisite: MATH 117 - College Quantitative Reasoning  
    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 92 - Prealgebra  OR course placement OR SAT MATH ≥ 480 OR ACT MATH ≥ 18 OR NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, or Geometry) score ≥ 65
  
  • MATH 116 - The Development of Mathematical Thought

    3 credits

    A chronological survey of mathematics presented in historical perspective as a major cultural force in the rise of civilization. Emphasis is on problem studies with classical solutions, student projects, classroom demonstrations, and selected historical readings. The course is designed primarily for non-technical students.

    Notes: Specific graphics calculator required; wait until first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 93 - Beginning Algebra  or MATH 94 - Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 530; or ACT Math ≥ 22; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, OR Geometry) score ≥ 80
  
  • MATH 117 - College Quantitative Reasoning

    3 credits

    A course in quantitative literacy designed for students in Liberal Arts, Social Science, and Humanities. Emphasis will be on the practical aspects of mathematics. Topics include: non-traditional problem solving techniques, personal finance utilizing a graphing calculator organizing and analyzing data, the Normal Curve, methods of counting, applications of elementary probability, and mathematical research on the Internet. Written projects are required in one or more of the following areas: analysis of a stock market portfolio, a statistical case study, and historical topics related to mathematics.

    Notes: Specific graphics calculator required; wait until first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 93 - Beginning Algebra  or MATH 94 - Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 530; or ACT Math ≥ 22; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, OR Geometry) score ≥ 80
  
  • MATH 117H - College Quantitative Reasoning-Honors

    3 credits

    A course in quantitative literacy designed for students in Liberal Arts, Social Science, and Humanities. Emphasis will be on the practical aspects of mathematics. Topics include: non-traditional problem solving techniques, personal finance utilizing a graphing calculator, organizing and analyzing data, the Normal Curve, methods of counting, applications of elementary probability, and mathematical research on the Internet. Graph theory, Voting Methods and Apportionment.

    Prerequisites: MATH 93 - Beginning Algebra  OR  MATH 94 - Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning  OR appropriate placement OR SAT Math = 450 OR ACT Math = 16.
  
  • MATH 118 - Analytic Trigonometry with Applications

    3 credits

    Angles; definition of the trigonometric functions; radian measure; linear and angular velocity; graphs and transformations of the trigonometric functions; identities; inverse trigonometric functions; solving trigonometric equations; law of sines; law of cosines; complex numbers. Applications of trigonometry to right triangles, oblique triangles, vectors, work, navigation, elevation and depression problems.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 93 - Beginning Algebra ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 530; or ACT Math ≥ 22; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, OR Geometry) score ≥ 80
  
  • MATH 120 - The Nature of Mathematics

    4 credits

    The purpose of this course is to improve problem-solving skills and extend students’ understanding of the nature of mathematics beyond algebra. Topics include: problem solving, number theory, secret codes, the golden rectangle, symmetry, the concept of infinity, topology, chaos, fractals, the uses and abuses of statistics, uncertainty and decision making. This course is appropriate for liberal arts students entering fields of study that are not mathematically-oriented.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 93 - Beginning Algebra  or MATH 94 - Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 530; or ACT Math ≥ 22; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, OR Geometry) score ≥ 80
  
  • MATH 120H - The Nature of Mathematics - Honors

    4 credits

    The purpose of this course is to improve problem solving skills and extend students’ understanding of the nature of mathematics beyond algebra. Topics include: problem solving, number theory, secret codes, the golden rectangle, symmetry, the concept of infinity, topology, chaos, fractals, the uses and abuses of statistics, uncertainty, and decision making. This course is appropriate for Liberal Arts students entering fields of study that are not mathematically-oriented.

    Notes: Honors permission required.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of a college-level math course or appropriate course placement.
  
  • MATH 123 - Math for Elementary School Teachers

    3 credits

    Designed for students in the Childhood Education curriculum, this course investigates the practical context of the mathematics taught in elementary school and the reasoning behind its skills and methods. Topics include numbers and numeration, place value, arithmetic operations and algorithms, estimation, prime numbers and factoring, and may also include fractions, decimals, proportional thinking and negative numbers. Emphasis is on problem-solving and communication in mathematics.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 93 - Beginning Algebra  or MATH 94 - Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 530; or ACT Math ≥ 22; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, OR Geometry) score ≥ 80
  
  • MATH 131 - College Algebra

    4 credits

    An introduction to algebraic functions and their graphs, solving equations that involve algebraic functions, and the use of function notation. Topics include Linear Functions, Quadratic Functions, Polynomial Functions, Rational Functions, Radical Functions, and Systems of Linear Equations.

    Prerequisites: MATH 93 Beginning Algebra , appropriate course placement, qualifying SAT Math score (>530); or qualifying ACT Math score (> 22)
  
  • MATH 138 - Elements of Geometry

    3 credits

    A study of various topics in geometry which include: constructions, proofs, transformations, three dimensional and fractal geometry. This course is designed to emphasize discovery and visualization for students in the Liberal Arts curriculum.

    Notes: Was MATH 114 previous to Fall 2010.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 93 - Beginning Algebra  or MATH 94 - Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 530; or ACT Math ≥ 22; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, OR Geometry) score ≥ 80
  
  • MATH 140 - Statistics

    4 credits

    A general introduction to statistical methods for students in all academic disciplines. Topics include: descriptive methods and the presentation of data, a thorough treatment of the basic concepts of probability, techniques of statistical inference and decision-making through hypothesis testing, the methods of correlation and regression analysis, and the application of non-parametric methods in various subject areas.

    Notes: Specific graphics calculator required; wait until first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 93 - Beginning Algebra  or MATH 94 - Foundations of Mathematical Reasoning ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 530; or ACT Math ≥ 22; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, OR Geometry) score ≥ 80
  
  • MATH 141 - Business Statistics

    4 credits


    A general introduction to statistical methods taught using a business perspective. This course is particularly suitable for students in business, information, and decision sciences. Topics include: descriptive statistics, the laws of probability, the concept of expected value and the value of information. Hypothesis testing and modeling are also covered.

    Notes: Was MATH 113A previous to Fall 2010.

    Specific graphics calculator required; wait until after first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: Any college-level mathematics course.
    Offered fall and spring semesters.

  
  • MATH 142 - Statistics 2

    4 credits

    A continuation of MATH 140 - Statistics  to include the topics: multiple regression, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, experimental design, and time-series analysis. Computer software will be an integral component of this course. Minitab statistical software will be used throughout.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 140 - Statistics ; or AP (Statistics) score ≥ 3
  
  • MATH 160 - Precalculus for Business

    4 credits

    This course is designed mainly for students in business and the social sciences. It covers topics important in these disciplines and prepares students for Calculus for Business and Economics. Topics include probability, systems of equations, linear programming, and modeling using linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Significant applications are studied in business and social sciences.

    Notes: Known prior to Fall 2013 as Finite Mathematics and Precalculus for Busniess.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 135 - College Algebra with Trigonometry ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 580; or ACT Math ≥ 25; or NYS Regents (Algebra 1, Algebra 2, AND Geometry) score ≥ 80
  
  • MATH 161 - Precalculus (Functions and Coordinate Geometry)

    4 credits

    A detailed analysis of transcendental functions essential to the mastery of a follow-up course in calculus. Topics include Exponential Functions, Logarithmic Functions, Right Triangle Trigonometry, Trigonometric Functions, Trigonometric Identities, Applications of Trigonometric Functions, and Conic Sections.

    Notes: Specific graphics calculator required; wait until first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: MATH 131  or appropriate course placement or  SAT Math ≥ 580 or ACT Math ≥ 25. If you have already taken MATH 135 College Algebra with Trigonometry, see the curriculum chair.
  
  • MATH 170H - History of Math - Honors

    3 credits

    A survey of the history of Mathematics from counting through calculus. The Internet is the main reference tool to investigate the contributions of various cultures and individuals. A problem solving approach is used to study the mathematical contributions of each culture.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of prerequisite course MATH 130 College Algebra: Functions & Models  or appropriate course placement.
  
  • MATH 180 - Calculus for Business

    4 credits


    Topics include differentiation and integration of algebraic, logarithmic, and exponential functions from a non-theoretical point of view. Business and economic applications are emphasized and include: break-even points; cost-benefit models; supply and demand curves; marginal cost and profit functions; growth and decay models; optimization techniques; average cost; elementary differential equations; and Lagrange multipliers.

    Notes: Was MATH 119 previous to Fall 2010.

    Specific graphics calculator required; wait until first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 160 - Precalculus for Business  or MATH 161 - Precalculus (Functions and Coordinate Geometry) ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 630; or ACT Math ≥ 28

  
  • MATH 181 - Calculus 1

    4 credits

    Subjects include: Concept of Limit; understanding and applying the definition of a derivative; analyzing curves of functions; related rates; optimization applications; Rolle’s Theorem; Mean Value Theorem; differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic, exponential and other transcendental functions; antiderivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions; integration using u-substitutions. 

    Notes: Specific graphics calculator required; wait until first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 161 - Precalculus (Functions and Coordinate Geometry) ; or Course Placement; or SAT Math ≥ 630; or ACT Math ≥ 28
  
  • MATH 191 - Calculus 2

    4 credits

    Riemann Sums, the definite integral  and the definition of area; fundamental Theorems of Calculus and the area under a curve; integration of a logarithmic, exponential and other transcendental  functions; theory and applications of the definite integral; techniques of integration; L’Hopital’s Rule; improper integration; infinite series, including power series and Taylor’s formula. 

    Notes: Specific graphics calculator required; wait until after first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 181 - Calculus 1  ; or AP (Calculus AB or BC) score ≥ 3
  
  • MATH 204H - Mathematical Modeling-Honors

    4 credits

    Advanced mathematics as it is applied in industry, science and government. The modeling process; discrete and continuous dynamical systems; curve-fitting; probabilistic modeling and simulation; discrete and continuous optimization. Students learn the appropriate software, work on modeling problems from the COMAP organization, and become prepared to form teams to enter COMAP’s annual modeling contest.

    Prerequisites: MATH 191 Calculus 2 .
  
  • MATH 205 - Special Project/Independent Study

    3 credits

    Adapted to the needs and interests of the special college student. Content and number of credits to be approved and determined by the Math Department Chair. This course is designed for enrolled Westchester Community College students only.

    Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
  
  • MATH 207 - Introduction to Numerical Analysis

    3 credits

    Successive approximations, error analysis, differentiation and integration, interpolation, polynomials, simultaneous linear algebraic equations, inversion of matrices and eigenvalues, various methods of solving differential equations using computer implementation.

    Prerequisites: MATH 181 Calculus 1 , COMSC 101 Computer Programming 1 , COMSC 207 Java Programming , or equivalent.
  
  • MATH 210 - Mathematical Modeling



    Advanced mathematics as it is applied in industry, science and government. The modeling process; discrete and continuous dynamical systems; curve-fitting; probabilistic modeling and simulation; discrete and continuous optimization. Students learn the appropriate software, work on modeling problems from the COMAP organization, and become prepared to form teams to enter COMAP’s annual modeling contest.

    Prerequisites: MATH 191 Calculus 2 .
  
  • MATH 215 - Linear Algebra

    4 credits

    A challenging introduction to modern mathematical thinking, showing the structure of mathematics as opposed to routine mechanical techniques. Topics include: vector spaces, linear mappings, bases, duality, orthogonality and scalar products, determinants and matrices, and matrix transformations. Applications in engineering, science, business, and computer science.

    Notes: Was MATH 206 previous to Fall 2010.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 191 - Calculus 2 ; or AP (Calculus BC) score ≥ 4
    Offered once a year.
  
  • MATH 220 - Introduction to Probability Theory

    4 credits

    A calculus-based approach to modern probability and statistics, topics include an introduction to probability, counting methods, conditional probability, Bayes’ Theorem, discrete and continuous random variables and functions of random variables. This course is particularly suited for students intending to major in mathematics, statistics, computer science, physics (and the physical sciences) or engineering.

    Notes: Was MATH 208 previous to Fall 2010.

    Prerequisites: MATH 191 Calculus 2 .
  
  • MATH 230 - Calculus 3

    4 credits


    Vectors and vector functions in two and three dimensions; partial differentiation; analytic geometry and calculus of functions of several variables; Lagrange multipliers; multiple integration with applications; vector analysis; line integrals; Green’s and Stoke’s Theorems; divergence. 

    Notes: Was MATH 201 previous to Fall 2010.

    Specific graphics calculator required; wait until first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 191 - Calculus 2 ; or AP (Calculus BC) score ≥ 4

  
  • MATH 240 - Differential Equations

    4 credits


    An introductory study of the solution of several kinds of first order and linear higher order differential equations that occur in the real world. Applications include chemical mixing, electrical circuits, mechanical oscillations, the spread of epidemics and logistic population growth. Other topics include Laplace Transforms, series solutions, and numerical methods with applications in science and engineering.

    Notes: Was MATH 203 previous to Fall 2010.

    Specific graphics calculator required; wait until first day of class before purchasing.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 191 - Calculus 2 ; or AP (Calculus BC) score ≥ 4

  
  • MATH 250 - Introduction to Mathematical Proof

    3 credits

    An introduction to formal mathematical reasoning and proof with a heavy emphasis on writing and communicating mathematics effectively. Topics include set theory, logic, methods of proof, relations, functions and cardinality of sets.

    Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of MATH 191 - Calculus 2 ; or AP (Calculus BC) score ≥ 4
  
  • MATH 292 - Mathematical Excursions

    3 credits

    A course in creative problem solving in which each participant is encouraged to experiment with diverse strategies on a wide range of unique problems in algebra, geometry and number theory.

    Prerequisites: MATH 135 - College Algebra with Trigonometry  or higher.
    Offered evenings only, based on student demand.

Mechanical Technology

  
  • MECH 109 - Intro to Engineering

    3 credits

    This course is designed to introduce engineering students to areas of engineering including the major areas of civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering. The course is taught by at least two professors from different disciplines. Topics covered include a general discussion of ethics, engineering communication, engineering calculations/graphics using Excel, Math Lab, etc. There is an emphasis on teamwork, with written and oral presentation required.

    Corequisite: MATH 181 - Calculus 1  or a higher level MATH class.
  
  • MECH 115 - Intro to Nanotechnology

    3 credits

    This course will provide a highly interdisciplinary introduction to the science of nanoscale materials (nanoscience). The course will survey the new field of nanoscience/nanotechnology, aiming to motivate interest and heighten awareness of this field. Its many potential applications in medicine, biology, electronics and optoelectronics, engineering, materials science and chemistry, open a broad new horizon of an exciting technology to serve societal needs.

  
  • MECH 120 - Mechanisms

    3 credits

    This course is designed to provide operational and technical knowledge in the field of maintenance technology, encompassing: mechanics, electronics, welding, preventative maintenance and safety. It shall cover extensively the use and design of mechanical components which require a variety of skills needed to work with them safely in an industrial setting.

    Prerequisites: MATH 135 College Algebra with Trigonometry  (or higher) and MECH 162 Autodesk AutoCAD .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • MECH 126 - Statics

    3 credits

    Fundamental concepts and principles from a calculus orientation; force systems, free body diagram; particles and rigid bodies. Varignon’s theorem; analytical and graphic methods of problem solutions; moments of inertia; centeroids and centers of gravity.

    Prerequisites: MATH 181 Calculus 1  and PHYSC 121 Engineering Physics 1 (and Lab) .
    Offered days, fall semester; evenings, spring semester.
  
  • MECH 127 - Introduction to Thermodynamics

    3 credits

    This course will investigate the first and second laws of thermodynamics and the applications to steam cycles and refrigeration. The properties of liquids and gases will be studied. The ideal gas laws will be explored through the mixture of air-water vapor using the psychometric chart. The energy balance of steam turbines will be evaluated for their efficiencies. Heat exchange applications will be studied through the theory of heat transfer.

    Prerequisites: MATH 135 College Algebra with Trigonometry  or higher, and PHYSC 101 - Technical Physics 1 - Mechanics (and Lab)  or higher (except MATH 138 - Elements of Geometry  or MATH 140 - Statistics ).
  
  • MECH 130 - Co-op Education in Mechanical Technology 1

    3 credits

    Co-op courses are designed to promote career awareness through cooperative work experience in the specific field. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with faculty advisor and written assignments are required.

    Notes: 225 work hours required.

    Prerequisites: Approval of Curriculum or Department Chair; GPA of 2.5 or higher; 9 earned credits in curriculum-required courses and 3 credits in ENG 101 - Writing and Research  (or equivalent) for a total of 12 credits; and a major declared in this specific curriculum.
    Offered fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  • MECH 133 - Co-op Education in Mechanical Technology 2

    3 credits

    Co-op courses are designed to promote career awareness through cooperative work experience in the specific field. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with faculty advisor and written assignments are required.

    Notes: 225 work hours required.

    Prerequisites: Approval of Curriculum or Department Chair; GPA of 2.5 or higher; 9 earned credits in curriculum-required courses and 3 credits in ENG 101 - Writing and Research  (or equivalent) for a total of 12 credits; and a major declared in this specific curriculum. For MECH 133, MECH 130 Co-op Education in Mechanical Technology 1  is required.
    Offered fall, spring and summer semesters.
  
  • MECH 144 - Manufacturing 1

    3 credits

    Lecture and Laboratory on set up and operation of basic machine tools, Press Lathe, and Milling machine. Also included in this course are lectures and demonstrations of various cutting tools used in manufacturing. Includes carbides as well as basic heat treating and welding.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • MECH 145 - Manufacturing 2

    3 credits

    Lecture and Laboratory course that expands on MECH 144 Manufacturing 1 . This course expands on the use of machine tools studied in the first course as well as the set and operation of the Grinding Machine and the CNC Measures.

    Prerequisites: MECH 144 Manufacturing 1 .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • MECH 156 - Fluids

    3 credits

    Study of the physical properties of fluids. Topics include elementary fluid statistics and dynamics, energy equation, introduction to fluid flow in circular pipes, elementary principles of flow measuring and devices and pumps, and an introduction to open channel flow.

    Prerequisites: MATH 135 College Algebra with Trigonometry  or higher, and PHYSC 101 - Technical Physics 1 - Mechanics (and Lab)  or higher.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • MECH 162 - Autodesk AutoCAD

    3 credits

    An introductory course in Autodesk’s AutoCAD software basics, using real-world examples and techniques. Students will become familiar with the AutoCAD’s interface, tools and user options needed to create and print drawings. Students will create and modify both mechanical and architectural drawings and components while learning drawing concepts and tools that can be used in a variety of industries.

    Notes: This introductory course is part of a sequence of drafting courses designed to prepare student for proficient use of multiple drafting platforms that serve the field of engineering and architecture.

    Pre or Corequisites: MATH 131 

  
  • MECH 164 - Autodesk Revit Architecture

    3 credits

    An introductory course in Autodesk’s Revit software using the basics of architectural modeling principles and real-world examples and techniques. Students will become familiar with the Revit’s interface, tools and structure needed to create three-dimensional models, which integrate their overall building and design drawings. Students will create and modify components in a building design along with the building preliminary model and add layers to help analyze and augment their designs.

    Prerequisites: MECH 162 Autodesk AutoCAD 
  
  • MECH 180 - Fundamentals of Light and Lasers



    Lasers are used in almost all industries and aspects of our lives. This introductory class will teach students the fundamental properties of light and lasers. They will study safety requirements for working with lasers as well as learning to set up optics and the properties of different materials. They will also study the different types of lasers and their uses. There are labs associated with each module.

  
  • MECH 204 - Thermodynamics for Engineers

    3 credits

    Basic concepts, open and closed systems, properties of substances; ideal and real gases; conservation of mass, energy; first and second laws of thermodynamics; applications, including gas and vapor cycles; introduction to free energy and Gibbs equations; gas mixtures.

    Corequisite: MATH 191 Calculus 2 .
    Prerequisites: MATH 181 Calculus 1  and CHEM 107 Inorganic Chemistry 1 (and Lab) .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • MECH 224 - CNC Programming

    3 credits

    An advanced study of computer numerically controlled machine tools and use of CAD/CAM software to write programs. Individual/group lab projects requires.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • MECH 227 - Dynamics

    3 credits

    Kinematics and kinetics; rectilinear and curvilinear motion; force, mass acceleration; work and energy; impulse and momentum for particles and rigid bodies. Calculus orientation.

    Prerequisites: MECH 126 Statics .
    Offered evenings, fall semester; days, spring semester.
  
  • MECH 255 - Solidworks

    3 credits

    An introductory course in Solidworks software using parametric modeling techniques and sketching tools to create three-dimensional parts, assemblies, and three-dimensional presentations of mechanical components. Students will become familiar with the Solidworks interface, tools, and user options needed to create and print drawings and printable 3D models. Students will create and modify mechanical drawings in preparation for simulation, rapid prototyping, and manufacturing.

    Notes: This is a follow-up course that is part of a sequence of drafting and design courses intended to prepare students for proficient use of multiple drafting platforms that serve the field of engineering.

    Prerequisites: MECH 162 Autodesk AutoCAD 
  
  • MECH 265 - Autodesk Inventor

    3 credits

    An introductory course in Autodesk’s Inventor software using parametric modeling techniques and sketching tools to creating three-dimensional parts, assemblies, and 3-D presentations of mechanical components. Students will become familiar with e Inventor’s interface, tools and user options needed to create and print drawings and printable 3D models. Students will create and modify mechanical drawings in  preparation for simulation, rapid prototyping and manufacturing.

    Notes: This is a follow-up course, part of a sequence of drafting and design courses intended to prepare students for proficient use of multiple drafting platforms that serve the field of engineering.

    Prerequisites: MECH 162 Autodesk AutoCAD 
  
  • MECH 267 - Autodesk Revit Architecture Advanced

    3 credits

    An advanced course in Autodesk’s Revit software building on the basics of architectural modeling principles learned in the introductory level course. Students will become moor intimate with Revit’s interface, tools and be able to modify structures needed to create three-dimensional models, which integrate their overall building and design drawings and now apply 3D rendering and 3D print models to scale. Students will create and modify more advanced components in a buildings design along with the modification preliminary models, which aid in analysis of designs.

    Notes: This is a follow-up course, part of a sequence of drafting and design courses intended to prepare students for proficient use of multiple drafting platforms that serve the field of architecture and engineering.

    Prerequisites: MECH 164 - Autodesk Revit Architecture  
  
  • MECH 270 - CAD/CAM

    3 credits

    An introductory course in computer aided manufacturing, where students apply part geometry and skills from solid modeling to create tool paths for CNC ready part programs, used on milling machines and lathes. Students will create setups and code for various parts and fixtures using industry accepted methods of phototyping and machining operations to execute on machine tools for part manufacturing. This work includes related technologies such as tool selections, feed and speed rates, 3D printing and use of non-traditional materials.

    Prerequisites: MECH 144 - Manufacturing 1  and one Solid Modeling course: MECH 255 - Solidworks  or MECH 265 - Autodesk Inventor  
  
  • MECH 277 - Autodesk Civil 3D

    3 credits

    An introductory course in Autodesk’s Civil 3D software where students apply their foundation skills from AutoCAD to create new and complex civil engineering drawings. Students will create a topographic document with survey and relevant field-generated data to develop site parcels, drainage systems and roadways using survey data for their engineering projects. Modeling and modifying current and desired site conditions with simulations in real time.

    Notes: This is a follow-up course, part of a sequence of drafting and design courses intended to prepare students for proficient use of multiple drafting platforms that serve the field of engineering.

    Prerequisites: MECH 162 Autodesk AutoCAD  
  
  • MECH 280 - Laser Systems and Applications

    3 credits

    Photonics Systems Technicians integrate, operate, maintain, repair, and calibrate systems in materials processing, medical applications, IT and communications, nanotechnology, defense, environmental monitoring, and other applications. PSTs have the responsibility of ensuring photonic devices operate within prescribed specifications and are compatible and/ or complementary with the entire integrated system. Students will learn these skills in this class.

    Prerequisites: MECH 180 Fundamentals of Light and Lasers  
  
  • MECH 289 - Manufacturing Process

    3 credits

    Physical Properties of ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys; study of fabricating processes such as casting, forging, machining, welded construction sheet metal processes and power metallurgy, together with the study of plastics and composites.

    Offered spring semester.

Music

  
  • MUSIC 100 - History of Western Music: Up to 1800

    3 credits

    This course covers the history of Western classical music from the ancient Greeks to the 1800s. Social and economic influences on music will be examined through listening to musical works from each time period. The course will also examine music from the Dark Ages and Medieval period, the Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical periods of music.

  
  • MUSIC 101 - History of Western Music: 1800 to Present

    3 credits

    This course covers the history of Western classical music from 1800 to the present day. Social and economic influences on musical styles will be examined as students listen to works from specific periods. The course will also examine music from the 20th Century, including gospel, jazz and rock.

  
  • MUSIC 102 - History of Electronic Music

    3 credits

    This course covers the history of electronic musical instruments and composition from its beginnings in the late 19th century to the present. Topics covered include the Telharmonium, the Theremin, the RCA Mark I synthesizer, Musique Concrete, MIDI and sampling, Progressive Rock, Techno, Interactive Music Systems, and multimedia. Through in-class performances, recordings, and videos, students become familiar with a wide range of music including the works of Xenakis, Stockhausen, Subotnick, Keith Emerson, Kraftwerk, the Crystal Method, and many others.

    Pre or Corequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • MUSIC 103 - History of Jazz

    3 credits

    A study of the evolution of jazz from its African, European, and American roots to its current position as a uniquely American art form. Major schools studied include early blues and ragtime, swing, be-bop, fusion, avant-garde, and the current scene. The course explores the impact of the African-American tradition on contemporary idioms such as rock, pop, and 20th century concert music, emphasizing form, structure, and its numerous contributions to U.S. and world culture.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors.

  
  • MUSIC 110 - Basic Musicianship

    3 credits

    This introductory course covers rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic elements of music. Types of triads, intervals, keys, cadences, scales are also covered with the emphasis on their use in 18th and 19th centuries.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors.

  
  • MUSIC 110H - Basic Musicianship - Honors

    3 credits

    This introductory course covers rhythmic, melodic, and harmonic elements of music. Types of triads, intervals, keys, cadences, scales are also covered with the emphasis on their use in 18th and 19th centuries.

  
  • MUSIC 111 - Music Theory 1

    3 credits

    This course focuses on analysis and composition. Students will analyze selected music from the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Analysis will indicate the function and quality of the chord in key. Students will also analyze secondary dominants and key modulations. Students will compose over a figured bass, and will use standard Common Practice rules and proper voice leading in the composition. Selected compositions will be performed in a concert.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 110 Basic Musicianship .
  
  • MUSIC 112 - Ear Training 1

    3 credits

    This course covers techniques of sight-singing and dictation of diatonic melodies in simple and compound meters. Emphasis is on the identification and performance of simple intervals, scales, triads and rhythms.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 110 - Basic Musicianship 
  
  • MUSIC 113 - Ear Training 2

    3 credits

    This course covers techniques of sight-singing and dictation of diatonic melodies in simple and compound meters. Emphasis is on the identification and performance of simple intervals, scales, triads and rhythms. The class examines major musical works, analyzing the various musical elements.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 112 Ear Training 1 .
  
  
  • MUSIC 121 - Piano Class 2

    2 credits

    Continuation of MUSIC 120 Piano Class 1 . Introduction to basic keyboard techniques and piano literature.

  
  • MUSIC 122 - Guitar Class 1

    1 credits

    Study of the guitar in solo and ensemble combinations. Materials of performance geared to abilities of students. Students must supply their own guitar.

    Offered spring and fall semesters.
  
  • MUSIC 123 - Guitar Class 2

    1 credits

    Study of the guitar in solo and ensemble combinations. Materials of performance geared to abilities of students. Students must supply their own guitar.

    Offered spring and fall semesters.
  
  • MUSIC 130 - Chorus 1

    2 credits

    Preparation and performance of a wide variety of compositions suitable for chorus.

  
  
  • MUSIC 132 - Instrumental and Vocal Ensemble 1

    2 credits

    Brass, strings, woodwinds, percussion and voice organized into ensembles to provide students with performing experience in such groups.

  
  
  • MUSIC 133D - Independent Music Study

    1 credits

    Individual instruction in piano, voice, organ, violin, viola, cello, double bass, harp, flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, trumpet, French horn, trombone, tuba, and percussion. Study includes technical skills and repertoire.

    Notes: Instruction one hour per lesson plus required practice sessions.

  
  • MUSIC 141A - Applied Music — Strings 1

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of a selected string instrument. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance. An additional fee per semester is required.

  
  
  
  
  • MUSIC 142A - Applied Music — Voice 1

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of the voice. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance.

    Notes: An additional fee per semester is required.

  
  
  
  
  • MUSIC 143A - Applied Music — Winds 1

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of a selected wind instrument. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance. An additional fee per semester is required.

  
  • MUSIC 143B - Applied Music — Winds 2

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of wind instruments. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance. An additional fee per semester is required.

  
  • MUSIC 143C - Applied Music — Winds 3

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of wind instruments. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance. An additional fee per semester is required.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 143B Applied Music — Winds 2 .

  
  • MUSIC 143D - Applied Music — Winds 4

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of wind instruments. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance. An additional fee per semester is required.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 143C Applied Music — Winds 3 .

  
  • MUSIC 144A - Applied Music — Piano 1

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of the piano. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance.

    Notes: An additional fee per semester is required.

  
 

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