May 19, 2024  
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog 
    
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Students should consult with their curriculum chair or counselor when selecting courses to satisfy program requirements. Please note: The honors versions of courses satisfy the same requirements as the non-honors versions.

 

Health Information Technology

  
  • HIT 110 - Health Sciences 1

    3 credits

    This course provides a one-semester overview of the human body. This course helps students develop a working knowledge of the structure and functions of the body systems and a foundation to understand medical lprofessionals’ reporting of the assessment, monitoring, and condition of patients. Topics include: introductory chemistry, the cell, and the skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, reproductive, cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, and excretory systems.

    Prerequisites: HCTAL 101 - Medical Terminology 
  
  • HIT 120 - Introduction to Health Information Management

    3 credits

    Students develop a broad understanding of the U.S. healthcare system and the role of the healthcare administration professional. Instructor includes health insurance and medical records management; patient relations and communication skills; government policies, medical ethics and legal issues; and career and professional development. Students also gain experience writing letters such as insurance claims appeals and requests for information, as well as create a resume and develop a job-search and career advancement strategy. 

    Pre or Corequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and HCTAL 101 - Medical Terminology  

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • HIT 130 - Health Sciences 2

    3 credits

    This course introduces the student to the basic principles of pathophysiology and pharmacology.  Core concepts include functional changes that occur in all body systems in response to injury or disease, diagnostic tests, treatment strategies, drug terminology, bodily and adverse effects, precautions and contra-indications.  Students learn about commonly used drugs in clinical practice with emphasis on their prescription for specific diseases.

    Prerequisites: HIT 110 - Health Sciences 1 
  
  • HIT 140 - Health Care Reimbursement

    3 credits

    Students develop an understanding of healthcare billing and reimbursement. Students will learn about health insurance plans and how to submit healthcare claims to the insurance companies for reimbursement and the related legal and regulatory guidelines for reimbursement. Compliance strategies and reporting will be discussed. Students will learn to input patient demographic information, insurance information, post payments to patient accounts, run financial reports as well as patient statements. The ethical standards of practice for billing and coding will be discussed.

    Prerequisites: HIT 120 - Introduction to Health Information Management   and  HCTAL 101 - Medical Terminology  
  
  • HIT 150 - Advanced Health Information

    3 credits

    Students develop a broad understanding of the U.S. healthcare system and the role of the healthcare administration professional. Instruction includes health insurance and medical records management; patient relations; government policies, regulations, audits, medical ethics and legal issues, compliance, HIPAA and professional development. Students will also gain experience in utilizing electronic health records and process requests for release of information, as well as create policies and develop career advancement strategy.

    Corequisite: HIT 210 - Intro to ICD-10  
    Prerequisites: HIT 120 - Introduction to Health Information Management  
  
  
  • HIT 220 - CPT-4/HCPCS

    3 credits

    A comprehensive course on CPT4 and HCPCS, emphasizing coding for evaluation and management, anesthesia, surgery, pathology, laboratory, radiology and medicine. Also included is coding for emergency rooms, hospitals, physician’s offices and outpatient facilities. The HCPCS coding book is utilized for coding medical, Medicare and Medicaid supplies.

    Notes: Long Title: Current Procedural Terminology, 4th edition/Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System

    Corequisite: HIT 210: ICD-10
    Prerequisites: HIT 120: Introduction to Health Information Management
  
  • HIT 230 - Advanced ICD - 10

    3 credits

    A comprehensive course involving study of the full range of administrative code sets applicable in today’s healthcare environment for reporting diagnoses, procedures, and services. A student at the intermediate level will learn to apply code set conventions, guidelines and principles for ICD-10-CM, ICD-10-PCS, and CPT codes. This course takes a systematic approach to hospital inpatient and ambulatory care coding emphasizing specific and correct coding procedures and techniques.

    Corequisite: HIT 220 - CPT-4/HCPCS  
    Prerequisites: HIT 210 - Intro to ICD-10  
  
  • HIT 250 - Professional Practice Experience 1: Coding

    2 credits

    Students practice authentic coding using industry standard software programs via V-lab to apply current knowledge of ICD-10 principles and guidelines. Apply knowledge of CPT-4/HCPCS coding as well as demonstrate an understanding of E & M levels. Students will also gain experience in practicing for the Certified Coding Associate (CCA) national coding credentialing examination through the CCA simulation exam.  

    Prerequisites: HIT 150 - Advanced Health Information HIT 220 - CPT-4/HCPCS  and HIT 230 - Advanced ICD - 10  
  
  • HIT 260 - Health Information Technologies

    3 credits

    This course introduces Health Information Technology (HIT) and its role in healthcare delivery systems. Topics include standards, regulations and initiatives; payment and reimbursement systems, healthcare providers and disciplines; and electronic health records (EHRs). Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of health information management and healthcare organizations, professions and trends.

    Prerequisites: HIT 250 - Professional Practice Experience 1: Coding  
  
  • HIT 270 - Healthcare Statistics & Research

    3 credits

    This course covers maintenance, compilation, analysis, and presentation of healthcare statistics and research protocols and techniques. Topics include basic statistical principles, indices, databases, registries, vital statistics, descriptive statistics, research protocol monitoring and knowledge-based research techniques. Upon completion, students should be able to apply, interpret, and present healthcare statistics and utilize research techniques to gather and interpret healthcare data.

    Corequisite: HIT 260 - Health Information Technologies 
    Prerequisites: HIT 250 - Professional Practice Experience 1: Coding  
  
  • HIT 280 - Health Leadership and Management

    3 credits

    This course provides a broad understanding of healthcare, leadership, management, and organizational behavior. It will address leadership roles, change management, work design and process improvement, human resources management, training and development, and strategic and organizational management.

    Corequisite: HIT 260 - Health Information Technologies 
    Prerequisites: HIT 250 - Professional Practice Experience 1: Coding  
  

Health Studies

  
  • HCTAL 101 - Medical Terminology

    3 credits

    This course introduces the common medical terms used in health related areas. Stress is on prefixes, suffixes, and word roots. A discussion of the anatomy and physiology of the human body, disease process, surgical and diagnostic procedures are presented, and different medical specialties and abbreviations are reviewed. Prior to Fall 2017, this course was NHSCI 101.

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • HCTAL 102 - Exploring Health Careers

    3 credits

    Designed for students planning a career in healthcare or health related fields, this course provides an introduction to the various health professions, resources for career planning, and the concepts of professionalism, healthcare ethics, cultural competence, interdisciplinary healthcare teams, and healthcare policies. This course introduces students to the broad range of health careers in different disciplines across the continuum of healthcare.

    every fall and spring
  
  • HCTAL 103 - Introduction to U.S. Healthcare Systems

    3 credits

    This course provides an overview of the organization and structure of healthcare delivery in outpatient, inpatient, and long-term care settings. Public policy, professional roles, best practices, care coordination, legal and regulatory issues, and payment systems are addressed. Current trends in healthcare delivery in the context of health reform initiatives in New York State and the U.S. will be examined.  

    Corequisite: HCTAL 102 - Exploring Health Careers  or HSERV 101 - Introduction to Social Work  
  
  • HCTAL 104 - Community Health Worker Foundations

    3 credits

    The Community Health and Case Management Certificate prepares students to work on the frontline in the fileds of public health, health care and human services. Coursework is foused on the theoretical knowledge, ethical practices and core competencies needed to assist individuals and families in need of medical, mental health and social services. Students will learn how to work with their clients in creating service plans, identifying resources, and developing strategies for the implementation of services. The certificate includes courses and fieldwork where students learn to apply their knowledge and skills in real work environments. Employment opportunities are available in numerous health and human service settings including hospitals, community health centers, mental health centers and substance abuse centers.

    Corequisite: HCTAL 103 - Introduction to U.S. Healthcare Systems  
  
  • HCTAL 105 - Practicum in Healthcare

    3 credits

    In this course students are assigned rotations in healthcare settings. During the rotation, the student works closely with a faculty member and an assigned mentor to develop a comprehensive understanding of work practices and the scope of practice. Mentors are selected from a variety of healthcare areas. Students evaluate and reflect on their development of skills that lead to successful employment in a healthcare setting. 

    Prerequisites: HCTAL 102 - Exploring Health Careers  and HCTAL 103 - Introduction to U.S. Healthcare Systems  
    every fall and spring

History

  
  • HIS 101 - Western Civilization to 1648

    3 credits

    This course is a survey of the history of Western Civilization from its earliest manifestations through the 17th century. The course begins with the birth of civilization, proceeds through Greek and Roman times to the Middle Ages and finally explores the Renaissance, the Reformation, the absolutist monarchies and the Scientific Revolution, ending with the Thirty-Years War and the formation of the nation state.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • HIS 102 - Western Civilization 2 1648-1914

    3 credits

    This course is a survey of events in Europe from the 18th century Age of Enlightenment until the First World War. The student are introduced to the ideas surrounding the French Revolution and the victory of democracy over the feudal aristocracy, the reform socialist movements of the industrial 19th century and the clash of empires leading to the global warfare in the 20th century.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research 
  
  • HIS 104 - Global History to 1648

    3 credits

    This course is a survey of global history from its origins in the fifth century B.C. in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East until the 16th century rise of Western Europe and colonial domination. A thematic approach enables the student to sort through large amounts of factual material to find patterns of development while maintaining sensitivity to cultural and ethnic differences. The rise and decline of major civilizations, the transition from an agrarian to an urban economy and the nature of warfare constitute some of the issues to be elaborated in this class. Emphasis is placed on exploring the historical roots of contemporary conflicts.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • HIS 106 - Global History from 1648

    3 credits

    This course is a survey of global history from the 16th century to the present. It explores the origins of the modern era and the forces, which have shaped the 20th century global relations. Attention is given to the development of Western democratic institutions through the English, French, and American revolutions and the European expansion into all corners of the world in the form of colonialism. The response of non-western societies to that expansion dominates much of the course and special emphasis is placed on the resultant changes in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The course also covers the effects of modern warfare on humankind and new international institutions as the world enters the 21st century.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research 
  
  • HIS 107H - Topics Global History-Honors

    3 credits

    This course is a survey of global history from earliest times to the present. It explores themes constant throughout that period to find patterns of development of governmental institutions and economic systems emphasizing the non- western as well as western experience. The rise and decline of major civilizations, the transitions from an agrarian to an urban industrial and now post-industrial society and the nature of warfare are examined. Emphasis is placed on discovering the historical roots of contemporary conflicts.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research .
  
  • HIS 110 - U.S. History Colonial-1800

    3 credits

    This course provides an in-depth analysis of transition in American history from colonial beginnings to an independent national state. It explores clashes or interests, sectional differences, and power conflicts as a new democratic system emerged. Emphasis is placed on changes in local institutions and on cultural and class diversity.

  
  • HIS 111 - 19th Century U.S. History

    3 credits

    This course explores the history of the United States from 1800 to the Spanish-American-Cuban War of 1898. Students study the growth of American institution, the struggles over slavery, the causes and consequences of the Civil War, and the development of industrialism. Special attention is paid to Western expansion, the handling of the Indian affairs, and the broadening of political participation.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • HIS 112 - 20th Century United States History

    3 credits

    The students examine the history of the United States from pre-World War I to the present; the development and impact of big business; the Progressive Era and World War II; the return to normalcy and the Depression; recovery and the New Deal; World War II and its aftermath; the Cold War, Korea, civil rights; the Kennedy administration and beyond.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research 

  
  • HIS 112H - 20th Century United States History-Honors

    3 credits

    This course presents a history of the United States from the Spanish-American War to the present; the development and impact of big business; the Progressive Era and World War I; the return to normalcy and the Depression; recovery and the New Deal; World War II and its aftermath; the Cold War, Korea, Civil Rights; the Kennedy Administration. It is designed to provide a background in United States social, economic and diplomatic developments in the 20th century.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research .
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • HIS 114 - US Constitutional History

    3 credits

    This course explores the historical roots and evolution of the U.S. Constitution from 1787 to the present, beginning with an examination of the document itself in the context of 18th century political theory and social relations as mirrored in the lives of its drafters, and continuing with an analysis of the constitutional controversies over broadening civil rights and popular participation of society through Constitutional amendment.

  
  • HIS 115 - Modern Europe

    3 credits

    The breakdown of Europe after World War I; the development of totalitarianism and World War II; the emergence of the new European community and east-west relations; designed for students with some knowledge of world history and a special interest in contemporary European affairs.

  
  • HIS 119 - Modern Latin America

    3 credits

    This course is a study of Latin American history and geography to the present. The course of study primarily focuses on 20th century political, economic, social and cultural history of Latin America. Key issues covered include the relationship of Latin American nations among themselves and with the rest of the world. Course examines historical roots of region tensions, national economies, political instability, reform movements and revolutions. The course focuses on evolving role of women, religious upheavals, cultural/artistic movements and problems of sovereignty.

  
  • HIS 128 - African History to 1600

    3 credits

    The students examine the history of Africa from man’s beginning to 1600 AD. This course focuses on the main topics of pre-colonial history such as: Africa at the dawn of history and the beginning of organized societies; early empires of North, West, East, South and Central Africa. Special attention is paid to the African Atlantic slave trade and its impact on Africa.

  
  • HIS 129 - Caribbean History

    3 credits

    This course offers an examination of today’s multi- cultural Caribbean. The focus is on the region and the diverse forces that have and continue to shape the culture and society. Regional geography for the course focuses on both Greater and Lesser Antilles, as well as South America, and on the Country of Guyana. Emphasis of the course is on connecting historical processes to the diverse cultural, ethnic, political and social structures of the contemporary Caribbean.

  
  • HIS 131 - Modern Africa

    3 credits

    The students examine the history of history of Africa from the early 1600s to the present. Major topics of discussion are the colonization of Africa by the European nations, the African independence movement, and Africa’s challenges, achievements and problems today. This course also focuses on pre-colonial African cultural institutions (social, economic, political, educational and religious) and the impact of colonialism on pre-colonial African cultures.

  
  • HIS 133 - African American History to 1865

    3 credits

    This American history course covers Africans and African Americans until the end of the Civil War. The African continent to 1600, the Atlantic Slave Trade in North America and The British North American settlements. 18th century topics include: The Struggle for Independence and The New Nation. 19th century conclusion includes: Antebellum America, Slavery, Opposition to Slavery, the Election of 1860, the Civil War, Emancipation Proclamation, and the end of the Civil War in 1865.

    Notes: Students who complete this course cannot use HIS 121  to fulfill degree and/or general education requirements.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • HIS 134 - African American History from 1865 to Present

    3 credits

    This course begins after 1865 building on  HIS 133 - African American History to 1865  to emphasize political, economic, social and cultural institutions which shaped the African American experience through the early 21st century.  Topics include: African American leadership in the late 19th century, migration, African Americans and WW I & II; the Civil Rights movements to 1980; the election of Barack Obama and African American developments to the present.

    Notes: Students who complete this course cannot use HIS 121  to fulfill degree and/or general education requirements.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • HIS 218H - Cambridge History-Honors

    3 credits

    This course consists of three weeks of intensive study with Cambridge University professors and a Westchester Community College Honors instructor. Pre- and Post-Cambridge conferences for preparation and assessment are required. Students register for two specialized seminars in History Summer School at Cambridge and attend two classes per day, in addition to morning plenary lectures. All written work is submitted to and graded by the Westchester Community College instructor. Students will receive a Certificate of Completion from Cambridge University.

    Notes: Students register for two specialized seminars in History Summer School at Cambridge and attend two classes per day, in addition to morning plenary lectures. All written work is submitted to and graded by the college instructor. Certificate of Completion from Cambridge University; four Westchester Community College Honors History credits.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature . Admission to the college Honors Program and permission from the instructor.
  
  • HIS 220 - Great Trials in History

    3 credits

    This is a survey course of famous trials in legal, historical, political, social and literary context starting with a foundation in how societies define law. The class will study twelve trials in-depth using both specific and comparative analysis. Critical thinking and analysis of the cases are integral to the course which will span over 2000 years of legal judgment.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  (or ENG 101H - Writing and Research - Honors ).

Human Services

  
  • HSERV 101 - Introduction to Social Work

    3 credits

    This course provides an orientation to the profession of social work. It offers an overview of the profession’s history, values, ethics, and knowledge base. The course provides a broad overview of the role and practice of social workers in addressing and advocating with five key social issues: Poverty, Mental Illness, Substance Abuse, Family and Child Welfare and Health Care.

  
  • HSERV 102 - Human Behavior and Social Development/Lifespan

    3 credits

    Examination of individual development within the context of the immediate environment and the larger multicultural societal environment. In examining the developmental process and tasks related to the human life cycle, students are exposed to concepts of sociobiology, psychosocial, behavioral and psychoanalytic theory. The theories of Freud and Erickson are emphasized and integrated into the overall systems framework.

    Notes: Was HSERV 103 previous to Fall 2010.

  
  • HSERV 200 - Diversity & Social Justice

    3 credits

    This course will examine diversity through the lens of systemic privilege and power. Students will gain an understanding of social justice, advocacy, and the skills necessary to participate ethically in a multi-cultural world.
    Students will acquire knowledge of the historical, sociological conditions that perpetuate social inequality and injustice.  Categories of diversity include race, ethnicity, immigration status, class, age, gender/gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, and (dis)ability.

    Notes: Was HSERV 205A previous to Fall 2010.

  
  • HSERV 260 - Group Dynamics and Leadership

    4 credits


    This course accompanies HSERV 261 Human Services Field Experience 1  and provides the opportunity for students to integrate their first field work experience with the basic concepts in the social systems approach to helping. Students learn about group dynamics and development. In weekly program skills workshops, students exercise leadership and group membership roles. The class also explores human service value assumptions as well as the many roles of the helping person.

    Notes: Was HSERV 110 previous to Fall 2010.

     

    Corequisite: HSERV 261 Human Services Field Experience 1 .
    Prerequisites: HSERV 101 Introduction to Social Work .

  
  • HSERV 261 - Human Services Field Experience 1

    3 credits


    Accompanies HSERV 260 Group Dynamics and Leadership  course and requires nine hours/week in a human services agency or school where students provide services to individuals or groups. Students are supervised by professional human service workers who help them learn about the function and the structure of the agencies, develop beginning skills in observation, group dynamics, communication, and developing relationships. Students maintain written records of their activities which are used in the linked seminar as a basis for classroom discussion.

    Notes: All students registering for this course must fill out and submit a Human Services Field Application (PDF) . Submission instructions appear at the top of the application.

     

    For Fall 2021, all field classes will be held remotely and if/when possible, in conjunction with placements in agencies.

    Corequisite: HSERV 260 Group Dynamics and Leadership .

  
  • HSERV 262 - Methods in the Helping Process

    3 credits

    Accompanies HSERV 263 Human Services Field Experience 2  and provides continued opportunity for students to integrate field work experience with the social systems approach to helping. The class learns the basic skills of the helping process, including interviewing techniques. Students examine their own value systems, strengths and weaknesses, and how these may affect their interpersonal relationships in a multicultural society. They analyze their field settings, use of helping skills, behavioral concepts, and they assess the utility and limitations of the tools of the human service worker.

    Notes: Was HSERV 201 previous to Fall 2010.

    Corequisite: HSERV 263 Human Services Field Experience 2 .
    Prerequisites: HSERV 260 Group Dynamics and Leadership .
  
  • HSERV 263 - Human Services Field Experience 2

    3 credits


    This field experience, which accompanies HSERV 262 Methods in the Helping Process , requires nine hours a week in a human services agency or school where students continue to perform tasks related and essential to the service offered by the agency. Under the supervision of a professional human services worker, students further develop intensive communications skills such as interviewing, recording, case presentation, and the referral process. Students learn to understand their own feelings and attitudes so they may better differentiate between the personal and professional self. Students maintain written records of their activities which are used in the linked seminar as a basis for classroom discussion.

    Notes: All students registering for this course must fill out and submit a Human Services Field Application (PDF) . Submission instructions appear at the top of the application.

     

    For Fall 2021, all field classes will be held remotely and if/when possible, in conjunction with placements in agencies.

    Corequisite: HSERV 262 Methods in the Helping Process .
    Prerequisites: HSERV 261 Human Services Field Experience 1 .

  
  • HSERV 264 - Case Management

    3 credits

    Students will learn the necessary skills needed to micro and macro manage individuals and families in need of comprehensive services.  Students will learn how to work with their clients in setting up service plans, identifying resources, and developing strategies for the implementation of services.

    Corequisite: HSERV 265 Human Services Field Experience 3 .
    Prerequisites: HSERV 260 - Group Dynamics and Leadership  
  
  • HSERV 265 - Human Services Field Experience 3

    3 credits

    One hundred twenty-six hours per semester of supervised internship are required in a human service agency or school where students continue to provide services to individuals and groups under professional supervision. Particular emphasis is placed on the understanding of case management skills, advocacy, effective interventions, resource identification, assessment and evaluation.

    Notes: Was HSERV 207A prior to Fall 2010.

    Corequisite: HSERV 264 Case Management .
    Prerequisites: HSERV 261 Human Services Field Experience 1 .
  
  • HSERV 268 - Introduction to Research and Statistical Methods

    3 credits

    This course is designed to prepare students to read, critically evaluate, and use research in Human Services. The course will provide the basic concepts of probability, descriptive, and inferential statistics and how they are utilized in research. Course content includes: scientific method, literature review, ethical standards, research methodology and design, tools of descriptive statistics, statistical problem solving, and the review and utilization of research findings.

    Prerequisites: HSERV 260 - Group Dynamics and Leadership  and HSERV 261 Human Services Field Experience 1  
  
  • HSERV 310 - Group Dynamics - Teachers Center

    4 credits

    This course accompanies HSERV 261 Human Services Field Experience 1  and provides the opportunity for students to integrate their first field work experience with the basic concepts in the social systems approach to helping. Students learn about group dynamics and development. In weekly program skills workshops, students exercise leadership and group membership roles. The class also explores human service value assumptions as well as the many roles of the helping person.

    Corequisite: HSERV 261 Human Services Field Experience 1 .
    Prerequisites: HSERV 101 Introduction to Social Work .
  
  • HSERV 311 - Human Services 1 Field Experience - Teacher’s Center

    3 credits

    Accompanies HSERV 260 Group Dynamics and Leadership  course and requires nine hours/week in a human services agency or school where students provide services to individuals or groups. Students are supervised by professional human service workers who help them learn about the function and the structure of the agencies, develop beginning skills in observation, group dynamics, communication, and developing relationships. Students maintain written records of their activities which are used in the linked seminar as a basis for classroom discussion.

    Corequisite: HSERV 260 Group Dynamics and Leadership .
  
  • HSERV 312 - Methods in the Helping Process - Teacher’s Center

    3 credits

    Accompanies HSERV 263 Human Services Field Experience 2  and provides continued opportunity for students to integrate field work experience with the social systems approach to helping. The class learns the basic skills of the helping process, including interviewing techniques. Students examine their own value systems, strengths and weaknesses, and how these may affect their interpersonal relationships in a multicultural society. They analyze their field settings, use of helping skills, behavioral concepts, and they assess the utility and limitations of the tools of the human service worker.

  
  • HSERV 313 - Human Services 2 Field Experience - Teacher’s Center

    3 credits

    This field experience, which accompanies HSERV 262 Methods in the Helping Process , requires nine hours a week in a human services agency or school where students continue to perform tasks related and essential to the service offered by the agency. Under the supervision of a professional human services worker, students further develop intensive communications skills such as interviewing, recording, case presentation, and the referral process. Students learn to understand their own feelings and attitudes so they may better differentiate between the personal and professional self. Students maintain written records of their activities which are used in the linked seminar as a basis for classroom discussion.

    Corequisite: HSERV 262 Methods in the Helping Process .
    Prerequisites: HSERV 261 Human Services Field Experience 1 .
  
  • HSERV 314 - Ethnic and Cultural Diversity - Teacher’s Center

    3 credits

    This course is designed to provide students with an orientation to inter-group relations that are grounded in economic, political, psychological and sociological theories and concepts. The beginning of the course focuses on developing a framework for examining different theoretical concepts that help in understanding minority group experiences. It then focuses on different strategies for accomplishing change. Finally it focuses on current issues and problems facing the major minority groups in the US today (African-Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Asians, American Indians, Women, GBLT, and the disabled). Emphasis is placed on self-examination, understanding the diversity of the American experience and embracing multiculturalism.

  
  • HSERV 315 - Human Services 3 Field Experience - Teacher’s Center

    3 credits

    One hundred twenty-six hours per semester of supervised internship are required in a human service agency or school where students continue to provide services to individuals and groups under professional supervision. Particular emphasis is placed on the understanding of case management skills, advocacy, effective interventions, resource identification, assessment and evaluation.

    Corequisite: HSERV 264 Case Management .
    Prerequisites: HSERV 261 Human Services Field Experience 1 .

Interactive Technologies

  
  • ITECH 100 - Digital Design

    3 credits

    This course provides a foundation of understanding and applying design thinking practices found in the development of digital designs. A host of multimedia software programs will be explored utilizing Adobe Creative Suite. Students learn and apply graphic design, time-base and interactive media principles to create multimedia projects. Topics include overview of pipeline production protocols, user experience design research and digital design contemporary trends found in creative and commercial applications.

    Notes: This design class is open to all students; no previous computer experience is necessary.

  
  • ITECH 110 - Digital Imaging

    3 credits

    This course covers the understanding of digital visual literacy, digital file protocols, screen and time-base media development. An emphasis will be on how to design interactive media such as web pages, game design, and time-base media using Adobe Photoshop. All digital media assignments will serve web, video and print industries. Topics will cover contemporary trends and best practices in copyright usage and digital media licensing. Students create an online portfolio that demonstrates student skills in new media literacy and digital media development, which serves diverse applications.

  
  • ITECH 120 - Web Design and Development (UX/UI)

    3 credits

    Students learn how to design and build effective web pages according to current UX/UI standards. The course will cover user experience and interface designs along with front-end development. Topics such as site development, screen and sequence designs and search optimization are applied. Web programming languages such as HTML5, CSS3 and JavaSript are introduced. Discussion on social media ethics, design effectiveness and digital marketing best practices are included.

    Notes: This web design class is open to all students; no previous computer experience is necessary.

  
  • ITECH 200 - Game Design and Interactive Media

    3 credits

    This course provides a foundation in the theory, design and development of interactive media for game design and applications. A host of multimedia software programs will be explored utilizing Adobe Creative Suite, 3D Animation programs and Interactive Development platforms. Students create an interactive rapid prototype for game design and interactive media based on industry best practices. Topics include overview of contemporary creative and commercial applications.

    Notes: This game design class is open to all students; no previous computer experience is necessary

  
  • ITECH 210 - 3D Visualization

    3 credits


    This course provides a foundation in creating 3D models for computer animation, industrial and product design. Students will utilize computer animation programs to design, build, light and animate 3D models for character design, creative, industrial and product design.

    Students learn how to construct 3D models, light with color and materials and apply rigging constraints for movement and animation. Topics include usage of 3D models and computer animation found in contemporary, scientific, industrial and commercial applications.

    Notes: This 3D animation class is open to all students; no previous computer experience is necessary.

  
  • ITECH 240 - New Media Projects

    3 credits

    This course is an overview of interactive new media applications currently used in web applications, digital media, interactive media, animation and product design. In a collaborative studio environment local area businesses and students design and develop a rapid prototype serving real world expectations. Through a series of class tutorials and discussions, students learn how industry-standard tools and practices are applied. Final projects may serve diverse industries such as commercial, scientific, educational, entertainment and/or community-based needs.

    Notes: Serves as an exiting course for spring graduates.

    Prerequisites: 18 credits in ITECH or approval from Curriculum Chair.
    Offered in spring semesters only.

Interdisciplinary Studies

  
  • INTER K - Interdisciplinary Initial Teaching Experience Program (ITEP): Modern Dance

    3 credits

    An Interdisciplinary independent study course, ITEP (Initial Teaching Experience Program) offers students experience in college-level instruction and tutoring. Under the close supervision of a faculty mentor, students observe teaching and learning in a subject-specific area, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss issues related to the class and specific content area instruction, and tutor students both in the mentor’s class and in the subject-specific tutoring lab. Students may focus on any discipline offered at the college. Each student must submit an application and receive the written nomination of the intended faculty mentor. 

    Prerequisites: Minimum 3.5 GPA in DANCE 101 Elementary Modern Dance 1  and permission of mentor.
  
  • INTER 200A - Initial Teaching Experience Program (ENG)

    3 credits

    An interdisciplinary independent study course, ITEP (Initial Teaching Experience Program) offers students experience in college-level instruction and tutoring. Under the close supervision of a faculty mentor, students observe teaching and learning in an English class, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss issues related to the class and specific content area instruction, and tutor students in the mentor’s classroom and at the college’s Academic Support Center. Each student must submit an application and receive the written nomination of the intended faculty member.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and permission of Instructor.
  
  • INTER 200B - Initial Teaching Experience Program (SPA)

    3 credits

    An interdisciplinary independent study course, ITEP: Spanish (Initial Teaching Experience Program: Spanish) offers students experience in college-level instruction and tutoring. Under the close supervision of a faculty mentor, students observe teaching and learning in Spanish, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss issues related to the class and specific content area instruction, and tutor students in the mentor’s classroom and in a foreign language tutoring lab. Each student must submit an application and receive the written nomination of the intended faculty member.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research , an advanced level of proficiency in Spanish (or foreign language placement score of 500), and permission of Instructor.
  
  • INTER 200C - Initial Teaching Experience Program (MUS)

    3 credits

    An interdisciplinary independent study course, ITEP: Music (Initial Teaching Experience Program: Music) offers students experience in college-level instruction and tutoring. Under the close supervision of a faculty mentor, students observe teaching and learning in music, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss issues related to the class and specific content area instruction, and tutor students in the mentor’s classroom and in a music tutoring lab. Each student must submit an application and receive the written nomination of the intended faculty member.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 111 Music Theory 1  and permission of Instructor.
  
  • INTER 200D - Initial Teaching Experience Program (ART)

    3 credits

    An interdisciplinary internship course, ITEP: Art (Initial Teaching Experience Program: Art) offers students experience in college-level instruction and tutoring. Under the close supervision of a faculty mentor, students observe teaching and learning in Art, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss issues related to the class and the Art content area instruction, and tutor students both in the mentor’s class and in the specified tutoring lab. Each student must submit an application and receive the written nomination of the intended faculty mentor.

    Prerequisites:

    ENG 101 Writing and Research , ART 113 3D Design  and permission of faculty mentor.

  
  • INTER 200E - Initial Teaching Experience Program (FILM)

    3 credits

    An interdisciplinary internship course, ITEP: Film (Initial Teaching Experience Program: Film) offers students experience in college-level instruction and tutoring. Under the close supervision of a faculty mentor, students observe teaching and learning in Film, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss issues related to the class and specific Film content area instruction, and tutor students both in the mentor’s class and in the specified tutoring lab. Each student must submit an application and receive the written nomination of the intended faculty mentor.

    Prerequisites: FILM 125 Writing for Film  and permission of faculty mentor.

  
  • INTER 200F - Initial Teaching Experience Program (OFTEC)

    3 credits

    An interdisciplinary internship course, ITEP: Office Technologies (Initial Teaching Experience Program: Office Technologies) offers students experience in college-level instruction and tutoring. Under the close supervision of a faculty mentor, students observe teaching and learning in Office Technologies, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss issues related to the class and specific computer applications content area instruction, and tutor students both in the mentor’s class and in the specified tutoring lab. Each student must submit an application and receive the written nomination of the intended faculty mentor.

    Prerequisites: BTECH 210 Spreadsheet and Database Applications , ENG 101 Writing and Research  and permission of faculty mentor.
  
  • INTER 200G - Initial Teaching Experience Program (ART HIST)

    3 credits

    An interdisciplinary internship course, ITEP: Art History (Initial Teaching Experience Program: Art History) offers students experience in college-level instruction and tutoring. Under the close supervision of a faculty mentor, students observe teaching and learning in Art History, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss issues related to the class and specific Art content area instruction, and tutor students both in the mentor’s class and in the specified tutoring lab. Each student must submit an application and receive the written nomination of the intended faculty mentor.

    Prerequisites:

    ART 109A Contemporary Art , ENG 101 Writing and Research  and permission of faculty mentor.

  
  • INTER 200J - Initial Teaching Experience Program (ART/DRAWING)

    3 credits

    An interdisciplinary internship course, ITEP: Art/Drawing (Initial Teaching Experience Program: Art/Drawing) offers students experience in college-level instruction and tutoring. Under the close supervision of a faculty mentor, students observe teaching and learning in Art History, meet regularly with the instructor to discuss issues related to the class and specific Art content area instruction, and tutor students both in the mentor’s class and in the specified tutoring lab. Each student must submit an application and receive the written nomination of the intended faculty mentor.

    Prerequisites: ART 101 Drawing 1 , ENG 101 - Writing and Research , and permission of faculty mentor.

Italian

  
  • INT 140E - Aspects of Renaissance Art: Art of the Italian Renaissance

    3 credits

    Offered through our summer program in Italy. An introduction to the paintings, sculpture and architecture of the Italian Renaissance, from the early 15th century to mid-16th century, considering the works of such artists as Masaccio, Fra Angelico, Botticelli, Donatello, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Titian, Giorgione, and others. Students have the opportunity to study the works both through class lectures and field trips to museums, churches, and sites in Rome, Assisi, Florence, Siena, Padua, Venice and Tivoli.

    Notes: Taught in English.

  
  • ITAL 101 - Elementary Italian 1

    4 credits

    This introductory course for beginning students of Italian develops the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. It introduces basic vocabulary and grammar and provides opportunities for students to enhance their understanding and appreciation of the Italian culture.

    Notes: No more than one year of high school Italian.

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  
  • ITAL 103 - Italian Conversation 1

    3 credits

    Basic conversation course for beginners, which emphasizes the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing, using real-life situations.

  
  • ITAL 104 - Italy: Its Culture and Its People (in English)

    3 credits

    An interdisciplinary course in humanities and social sciences designed to enrich the students’ knowledge of Italy and its culture through a study of evolution of the historical, cultural, literary, linguistic, political and social character of the country and its people. Also acquaints students with Italy’s contributions to Western civilization.

    Notes: Class taught in English.

    Offered fall or spring semester.
  
  • ITAL 105 - Italian American Culture (in English)

    3 credits

    Designed to acquaint students with Italian-American heritage and culture. The role, influence, and contributions of Italian-Americans to American society in the fields of art, music, science, literature, education, government, sports, and entertainment are examined.

    Notes: Class taught in English.

    Usually offered spring semester.
  
  
  • ITAL 110 - Italian Conversation 2 - Independent Study

    3 credits

    This course offers students the opportunity to continue to learn and develop basic communication skills, so that they can use their Italian correctly and intelligently in simple, real life situations.

    Prerequisites: ITAL 103 Italian Conversation 1  
  
  • ITAL 201 - Intermediate Italian 1

    3 credits

    This course provides students with an opportunity to develop their linguistic as well as communicative competencies in Italian based on readings of a literary and cultural nature while providing for additional review of grammar in the context of the reading selections. This course is conducted in Italian.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors.

    Prerequisites: ITAL 102 Elementary Italian 2 , or ITAL 106 Italian Conversation 2 , or three years of High School Italian or the equivalent.
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • ITAL 202 - Intermediate Italian 2

    3 credits

    Continuation of ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian 1 . This course continues to provide students with an opportunity to develop their linguistic as well as communicative competencies in Italian. The readings are designed to broaden students’ knowledge of Italy. Audio and videocassettes are also used to help further develop students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills within the scope of this intermediate level course. The course is conducted in Italian. May be taken for Honors.

    Prerequisites: ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian 1  or the equivalent.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • ITAL 202H - Intermediate Italian 2 - Honors

    3 credits

    Continuation of ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian 1 . This course continues to provide students with an opportunity to develop their linguistic as well as communicative competencies in Italian. The readings are designed to broaden students’ knowledge of Italy. Audio and videocassettes are also used to help further develop students’ listening, speaking, reading and writing skills within the scope of this intermediate level course. The course is conducted in Italian.

    Prerequisites: ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian 1  or the equivalent.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • ITAL 205 - Intermediate Italian Conversation 1

    3 credits

    Designed to provide the students with an opportunity to further master basic vocabulary structures and idiomatic expressions used in day-to-day conversation by students, travelers, tourists, working and business people here and abroad.

    Prerequisites:  ITAL 106 Italian Conversation 2 , ITAL 102 Elementary Italian 2 , or the equivalent.
    Offered fall semester, evening and summer session in Italy.
  
  
  • ITAL 207 - Learning Italian Through Cinema

    3 credits

    This course will introduce students to an advanced grammatical level by developing listening skills and learning new vocabulary in Italian. It offers a voyage through Italian cinema with the new generation of Italian directors such as Ettore Scola, Lina Wertmuller, Guiseppe Tornatore, Roberto Benigni, Silvio Soldini, Furio and Giacomo Scarpelli, and others. Viewing and discussion of the films, as well as readings, conversation, and composition will be in Italian, with an emphasis on syntax and style.

    Prerequisites: ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian 1 .
  
  • ITAL 250 - Advanced Italian 1

    3 credits

    Conversation, composition, and literature; study of syntax and style, reading of representative Italian authors; background lectures; intensive practice in speaking and writing. This course is conducted in Italian. May be taken for Honors.

    Prerequisites: ITAL 202 Intermediate Italian 2 , or ITAL 206 Intermediate Italian Conversation 2 , or natives, or four years High School Italian, or recommendation of the instructor.
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • ITAL 251 - Advanced Italian 2

    3 credits

    This course is a continuation of ITAL 250 Advanced Italian 1 .

    Notes: May be taken for Honors credit.

    Prerequisites: ITAL 250 Advanced Italian 1 , or natives, or four years of High School Italian (or the equivalent) or recommendation of the instructor.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • ITAL 251S - Advanced Italian - Honors

    3 credits

    This course is a continuation of ITAL 250 Advanced Italian 1 . May be taken for Honors credit.

    Prerequisites: ITAL 250 Advanced Italian 1 , or natives, or four years of High School Italian (or the equivalent) or recommendation of the instructor.

Japanese

  
  • JAPNS 101 - Elementary Japanese 1

    4 credits

    This course is designed for students who do not have any background in Japanese. The goal of this course is to build a solid foundation in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Japanese while developing an understanding and appreciation of Japanese culture. The hiragana and katakana symbols (Japanese phonetic writing systems) will be learned along with approximately 25 Kanji characters (Japanese-Chinese characters). At the end of the course, students should be able to engage in a variety of practical speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities.

  
  • JAPNS 102 - Elementary Japanese 2

    4 credits

    A continuation of JAPNS 101 Elementary Japanese 1 , this course expands upon familiar topics and introduces new topics through speaking, listening, reading, and writing activities within the context of modern-day Japanese culture. The two phonetic Japanese writing systems, hiragana and katakana, as well as all kanji studied in  Elementary Japanese 1  will be reviewed. Study of new kanji characters and the integration of the three Japanese writing systems in sentences, simple compositions, and dialogues, will be the focus of reading and writing activities.

    Prerequisites: JAPNS 101 Elementary Japanese 1  or permission from instructor.


Law

  
  • LAW 101 - Business Law

    3 credits

    This course introduces students to the legal and ethical frameworks of business. Contracts, negotiable instruments, the law of sales, torts, crimes, constitutional law, intellectual property, the Uniform Commercial Code, and the court systems are examined. Upon completion, the student will be able to identify legal and ethical issues that arise in business decisions and the laws that apply to them.

    Prerequisites: Complete MGT 101 - Business Organization and Management  with a grade of “C” or better.
  
  • LAW 102 - Business Law 2

    3 credits

    Law of agency and sales; law of negotiable instruments; law of guaranty and suretyship; corporations, partnerships; insurance; bankruptcy; real and personal property; employment and labor legislation; wills and estates.

    Prerequisites: LAW 101 Business Law .

Linguistics

  
  • LIN 201 - Introduction to Linguistics

    3 credits

    This course covers basic theories and concepts relating to the study of language and communication in humans. Topics include: Phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, language variation, and language change. It is designed as an introduction to the field of linguistics requiring no prior knowledge. Students interested in the study of language, or in becoming language teachers or translators, should consider taking this course.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors credit.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research .

Management

  
  • MGT 101 - Business Organization and Management

    3 credits

    This course provides students with a basic understanding of U.S. Business enterprises and the systems and forces that affect them. The course covers the major Functions of Management (Planning, Organizing, Staffing, Leadership, Coordination, and Controlling), business startup and ownership, economic theory, production, human resources, motivation, marketing and financial management. The course also introduces students to exercises that develop their ability to think critically, conduct sound research, anaylyze a variety of data, and publicly present a report.

    Pre or Corequisites:  ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • MGT 103 - Entrepreneurship

    3 credits

    This course will acquaint the student with the challenges and opportunities involved in starting and operating a new business enterprise. Course topics include: Characteristics of a successful entrepreneur, legal forms of ownership, legal protections including trademark, copyright and patents, HR, financial analysis, equity and debt financing, business planning, market selection, marketing, social entrepreneurship, franchising, innovation and successful business models.

    Prerequisites: MGT 101 - Business Organization and Management  with a grade of “C” or better.
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • MGT 130 - Co-op Education in Business Administration 1

    3 credits

    Co-op courses are designed to promote career awareness through cooperative work experience in a specific field. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with faculty advisor and written assignments are required.

    Notes: 225 work hours required.

    Prerequisites: Approval of Curriculum or Department Chair; GPA of 2.5 or higher; 9 earned credits in curriculum-required courses and 3 credits in ENG 101 - Writing and Research  or equivalent for total of 12 credits; and a major declared in this specific curriculum.
  
  • MGT 131 - Co-op Education in Business Administration 2

    3 credits

    Co-op courses are designed to promote career awareness through cooperative work experience in a specific field. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with faculty advisor and written assignments are required.

    Notes: MGT 130 is required. 225 work hours required.

    Prerequisites: Approval of Curriculum or Department Chair; GPA of 2.5 or higher; 9 earned credits in curriculum-required courses and 3 credits in ENG 101 - Writing and Research  or equivalent for total of 12 credits; and a major declared in this specific curriculum.
  
  • MGT 201 - Principles of Management

    3 credits

    This course brings together the cumulative learning in the Business Management A.S. degree program. The course addresses the scope and impact of management, ethical considerations, and the business environment. It also covers various aspects of business (including economics, accounting and marketing) and the functions of managemenet (including planning, organizing, staffing, leadership, coordination, and controlling). The course also develops the student’s ability to think critically, conduct sound research, analyze a variety of data, apply management concepts to case studies, and publicly present a report.

    Prerequisites: MGT 101 Business Organization and Management  with a grade of “C” or better.
  
  • MGT 205 - Human Resource Management

    3 credits

    This course explores the theory and practice of personnel management functions basic to effective and efficient operation of business, government and non-profit organizations. Students will examine the organization context of human resource management: recruitment and staffing the organization; employee performance, compensation, training and development; union employee relations; employee safety and health and organizational development.

    Prerequisites: MGT 101 Business Organization and Management  with a grade of “C” or better.
  
  • MGT 207 - Supervisory Management

    3 credits

    This course will equip students with the competencies required to be a supervisor. Students will gain the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to become effective supervisors and managers. They will also gain a practical understanding of social styles, leadership approaches, management styles, coaching employees, evaluating performance, facilitating meetings, motivation, controlling, prioritizing, planning at the departmental level, staffing, interviewing, resolving conflict, and fundamentals of customer service. 

  
  • MGT 215 - Global Business

    3 credits


    This course examines the major issues concerning international business and globalizaion from the perspective of US businesses. The course explores the cultural, historical, legal, political, economic, technological, and other factors that affect US businesses operating overseas. Topics such as the scope of international business, multinational firms, government policies, trade theories, and sustainability are also explored. The course also develops the student’s ability to think critically, conduct sound research, analyze a variety of data, apply management concepts to case studies, and publicly present a report.

     

    Notes: May be taken for Honors credit with approval from the Business Program co-directors.

    Prerequisites: MGT 101 Business Organization and Management  with a grade of “C” or better.


Marketing

  
  • MKT 101 - Marketing

    3 credits

    A survey course in the field of marketing; economic, psychological, and sociological influences on buyer behavior; product development, product line decisions, policies and strategies; determining distribution channels; promotional activities; and marketing research.

    Pre or Corequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • MKT 103 - Professional Selling

    3 credits

    This introductory course to selling provides students with the theory, concepts and skills of a professional salesperson. The primary focus is on professional business-to-business consultative selling that creates long-term profitable relationships. Topics covered include psychology of selling; relationship building; knowing your customer, product and competition; prospecting; developing a sales presentation; creating customer retention with value-added service and follow-up.

 

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