May 19, 2024  
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog 
    
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Students should consult with their curriculum chair or counselor when selecting courses to satisfy program requirements. Please note: The honors versions of courses satisfy the same requirements as the non-honors versions.

 

English

  
  • ENG 200 - American Literature to 1865

    3 credits

    Studies of American literature from early texts of indigenous peoples to 1865. Students will study a variety of texts that may include: oral traditions, pilgrim diaries, colonial texts, writings of the founders, slave narratives, and the transcendentalists. Authors may include: Bradstreet, Edwards, Paine, Jefferson, Hawthorne, Poe, Douglass, Dickinson, Thoreau, Twain, Whitman, and others. Students are expected to compose critical essays and conduct research. 

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • ENG 201 - American Literature from 1865

    3 credits

    Students will read a variety of texts that may include: novels, poems, essays, short stories, film, and drama. The cross-cultural selection of authors may include: James Hemingway, Hurston, O’Connor, Kingston, Baldwin, Kerouac, DeLillo, Diaz, and major poets and playwrights. Students are expected to compose critical essays and conduct research.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature  
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • ENG 202 - Children’s Literature

    3 credits

    An overview of major genres, periods, and themes of children’s literature. The focus is on writing done in English, but the class also considers some international developments in the history of children’s literature. In addition to books, other media is studied, including film and the Internet. This course also strengthens a student’s competence and confidence in literary analysis, scholarship, and writing. It also may satisfy a common requirement for undergraduate programs in teacher training.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
  
  • ENG 203 - African American Literature

    3 credits

    Studies in African-American literature and backgrounds, including slave narratives and autobiography. Emphasis is on the best writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, including many recent writers. Readings include novels, plays, essays, short stories, and poems.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
  
  • ENG 204 - Literature of New York

    3 credits

    A selective history of the great literary accomplishments of New York, from its beginnings as Dutch trading post to its present status as unrivaled world capital. Students study stories, poems, and historical documents and learn how American values such as liberty, diversity, and religious tolerance had their origins in a city founded on principles of commerce. Includes visit to New York Historical Society.

    Notes: May be taken for honors credit.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature 
    Offered fall semesters.
  
  • ENG 206H - Cambridge Literature Studies - Honors

    3 credits

    Cambridge Studies in Literature - Honors is an advanced literature course that involves two weeks of intensive study at Cambridge University. Students register for and attend two specialized seminars per week, in addition to morning plenary and evening lectures. All written work is submitted to and graded by a Westchester Community College instructor. Students receive an official Certificate of Completion from Cambridge University and three Westchester Community College Honors English/Humanities credits.

    Notes: Students register for two specialized seminars in Literature Summer School at Cambridge and attend two classes per day, in addition to morning plenary and evening lectures. All written work is submitted to and graded by the Westchester Community College instructor. Certificate of Completion from Cambridge University; four Westchester Community College Honors English/Humanities credits.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research , ENG 102 - Writing and Literature , and Honors permission.
  
  • ENG 208 - Literature of the Americas

    3 credits

    A survey of Anglophone literature(s) produced by key Chicano, Mexican, Asian-American, Asian-Canadian, Caribbean, Native-American and Native- Canadian authors. Focus is on the relationship between the cultures that these authors come from and the dominant white northern European culture that emerged from the early conflicts in the settlement of the American continent. A broad range of cultural and historical viewpoints are exposed through the diversity of the readings and attendant discussions.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • ENG 209 - Studies in the Short Story

    3 credits

    The development of the short story as a literary form. Reading, discussion, and analysis of short stories by major writers such as Chekhov, Gilman, Joyce, Hemingway, Wright, O’Connor, Baldwin, Carver, Oates, and others, in relation to their social and intellectual milieu.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature  
    Offered most semesters.
  
  • ENG 210H - The American Dream - Honors

    3 credits

    Examination of political, social, and economic visions of America based on a selection of literature from the “discovery” of America to the present (Columbus, Bradford, Franklin, Douglass, Clemens, Yezierska, Fitzgerald, Ellison, Miller, Kingston, etc.)

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature 
    Offered fall semesters.
  
  • ENG 211 - Modern Drama

    3 credits

    Modern drama focuses on contemporary plays, 1940’s to present. Studies include critical reading, discussion, and writing about plays as they relate to particular social and intellectual contexts. Attention focuses on issues of class, race, ethnicity, and gender whenever relevant. Students write interpretive essays and response papers, as well as their own original plays, based on elements of drama.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature 
  
  • ENG 215 - Introduction to Shakespeare

    3 credits

    An appreciation of Shakespeare’s plays as poetry and theatre, Shakespeare’s development as dramatist and poet, the intellectual milieu of Elizabethan England and its influence on Shakespeare’s use of dramatic forms and techniques.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature 
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • ENG 217H - Holocaust Studies - Honors

    3 credits

    This course studies the Holocaust in particular and racism in general. It examines a number of major questions such as, “How could a ‘cultured’ people, the nation of Beethoven, commit such barbaric crimes?” Special attention is given to the roles of silence, complicity, and personal responsibility. Students complete a three-part project in which they investigate an aspect of the Holocaust. Guest speakers and films complement the material.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • ENG 218 - Literature and the Environment

    3 credits

    This course requires students to read, analyze, and write about novels, poems and prose that relate to our environment in order to explore American attitudes about current environmental issues and conditions. Through these readings students will examine how literature illuminates, influences, and reflects our environment.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
  
  • ENG 224H - Great Books - Honors

    3 credits


    This course offers students the opportunity to read and to engage in intensive study and discussion of classic literary texts—works of enduring influence that stand among the sources of our intellectual tradition and have shaped the development of Western culture. Readings may include the works of Homer, Sophocles, Aeschylus, Euripides, Aristophanes, Boccaccio, Chaucer, Dante, Shakespeare, Cervantes, Moliere, Voltaire, Goethe, Shelley, Austen, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Joyce, Woolf, Hurston, Camus, Ellison, Achebe.

    (Also offered online)

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature , and Honors permission.

  
  • ENG 226 - Leadership and the Humanities

    3 credits

    This is an interdisciplinary humanities course that examines leaders and leadership issues. The course will include: study of classic and current leaders as seen in a variety of literary, philosophical and historical readings and films; readings in leadership theories, case studies in leadership, and experimental learning exercises; a mentoring program and service learning projects.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors credit.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
  
  • ENG 227 - Contemporary Global Literature

    3 credits

    An in-depth exploration of the best contemporary poetry, drama, and fiction. Emphasis is on the close study of texts and authors, in particular those works that present provocative comparisons across cultures and history.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • ENG 227H - Contemporary Global Literature - Honors

    3 credits

    An enhanced Honors version of ENG 227, offering in-depth exploration of contemporary literature, including poetry, drama, and fiction. Emphasis is on the close study of texts and authors, in particular those works that present provocative comparisons across cultures and history. Students will write analytical research essays that require an understanding of the political, historical, and/or cultural settings of the literature.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature  and admission into the Westchester Community College Honors College.
  
  • ENG 240 - Studies in American Poetry

    3 credits

    Studies in American poetry with reading, discussion, and analysis of major poets, among them Eliot, Frost, Hughes, Bishop, Ginsberg, as well as a number of contemporary poets, in relation to their social and intellectual milieu and considering the influences of earlier poets such as Whitman and Dickinson.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • ENG 241 - Latin-American Literature

    3 credits

    In this course students will read a variety of texts that may include: novels, poems, essays, short stories, film, and drama produced by Latin American writers living in Latin America and in diaspora. Students will pay close attention to how history and politics, geography of Latin America influence it’s literary past and present. Students are expected to  compose critical essays and conduct research. 

    Notes: May be taken for Honors credit.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
  
  • ENG 242 - Caribbean Literature

    3 credits

    In this course, students read novels, poems, essays, short stories, songs, film and drama produced by Caribbean artists living in the Caribbean and in diaspora. We will pay close attention to the ways in which the history and geography of the Caribbean influence its literary past and present. Students read and analyze a variety of literary texts and write critical essays, as well as conduct research.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
  
  • ENG 243 - Coming to America - Immigrant Literature

    3 credits

    In this course students read novels, poems, essays, short stories, and narratives written by immigrants to the United States. The course begins with the works of the earliest immigrants, the pilgrims, and advances through the centuries to present day. Students read and analyze a variety of literary texts, do research, and write critical essays. 

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
  
  • ENG 244 - Science Fiction

    3 credits

    Students read and discuss class and contemporary sci-fi novels, short stories, and comics. In blog entries, presentations, and essays, students will produce critical, evidence-based interpretations, developing original perspectives on the texts. Topics include: defining the human and the nonhuman, technology’s shaping of mind and body, and the uses of utopia and dystopia.

    Prerequisites: ENG 102 - Writing and Literature  
  
  • ENG 245 - LGBTQ Literature

    3 credits

    Through the reading of short stories, poems, novels, essays and plays, students will discover Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer voices that span from Ancient Greece to today. Important themes to the LGBTQ Community such as, Love, Sex, Gender, Homophobia, Politics, Society, Religion, Citizenship, Public Space, and AIDS will be discussed. Students will analyze, think and write critically, and present well-researched essays.


English as a Second Language (Academic)

  
  • ESL 94 - Introduction to Academic Writing 1

    0 credits

    This course is intended for nonnative speakers of English whose English writing proficiency must increase before they are able to take ENG 101 - Writing and Research and academic subjects that require essay examinations and term papers. Through practice in sentence structure and in planning, writing, and revising essays, students will continue to improve writing proficiency in English.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate course placement.
    Offered every semester.
  
  • ESL 122 - Introduction to Academic Writing 2

    3 credits

    This course is intended for nonnative speakers of English whose English writing proficiency must increase before they are able to take ENG 101 Writing and Research  and academic subjects that require essay examinations and term papers. Through practice in sentence structure and in planning, writing, and revising essays, students will continue to improve writing proficiency in English.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of prerequisite course ESL 94 Introduction to Academic Writing 1  or appropriate course placement.
    Pre or Corequisites: Two hours per week of tutorial work in the Academic Support Center are required.


Fashion Merchandising

  
  • FASH 105 - Introduction to the Fashion Industry

    3 credits

    This survey course covers the history, characteristics and global interrelationships of all segments of the fashion industry. The course explores how fiber, textile and apparel producers, retailers and home furnishings companies, merchandise and market their products within the industry and to the ultimate consumer.

  
  • FASH 108 - History of 20th Century Fashion

    3 credits

    This course surveys the evolution of dress from 1800 to present day, analyzing the impact of social, economic, environmental, and political circumstances, globally and locally, past and present. Students will process this information and research and develop future trends based on the current climate as it relates to our studies of historical fashion.

  
  • FASH 115 - Fashion Design Technology

    3 credits

    This course involves the study of form, line, balance, tone, shade, value, and pattern with reference to the human figure and its costume. The computer-based hands on assignments utilize Design CAD and Fashion Illustration software to produce textile designs, and color stories for merchandising and design presentations.

    Notes: Was RET 115 previous to Fall 2010.

  
  • FASH 120 - Garment Construction

    3 credits

    Students learn the fundamentals of design room sewing techniques used in the fashion industry; including the construction skills needed to execute designs in a professional manner. A sample garment is developed through the use of a basic pattern. Emphasis is on basic sewing construction skills, including fundamentals in the selection of fabrics, patterns, fit, and construction techniques. Students develop a sample library as well as a professionally finished garment.

    Notes: Prior sewing experience recommended, but not required. Material costs and lab fees apply.

  
  • FASH 150 - Flat Pattern Making and Design

    3 credits

    Students learn the fundamentals of patternmaking through development of foundation slopers including a basic bodice, sleeve, two-dart skirt, and pant. Variations on these slopers will then be applied to original design projects which will follow the design process from concept to paper pattern to finished garment in fashion fabric, to be shown at the departmental fashion show. Material cost and laboratory fees apply.

    Notes: Material costs and lab fees apply.

    Corequisite: FASH 120 Garment Construction  
  
  • FASH 205 - Textiles in the Global Marketplace

    3 credits

    The course addresses the fundamental knowledge of textiles, including the study of natural and manmade fibers, practical applications of textiles in the industry and in the arts, properties that affect fabric performance, and methods of production as they relate to yarns, dyes and finishes of the final product.  Traditional techniques as well as advancements in technology utilized in the textile industry are emphasized.

    Prerequisites: FASH 105 Introduction to the Fashion Industry  for Merchandising or FASH 108 - History of 20th Century Fashion  for Design
    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • FASH 206 - Visual Merchandising and Display

    3 credits

    This course introduces the basic elements of design related to promoting fashion merchandise. Topics include exterior and interior display, their coordination with other related departments, the use of color, equipment and display materials, lighting and sources of supply. Store fixtures, design fundamentals, and display principles are studied throughout analysis of interior and exterior displays and to give shape and substance to student ideas by the planning, installation, and evaluation of a series of displays.

    Notes: Was RET 206 previous to Fall 2010.

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • FASH 207 - Retail and Fashion Internship

    3 credits

    A work-study arrangement between the department and business/industry, retail stores, buying offices, and ad agencies, among others. Approval and recommendation of Curriculum Chair required. All hours are completed off-campus at the job location.

    Notes: Was RET 207 previous to Fall 2010.

    Prerequisites: Requires departmental consent.
  
  • FASH 215 - International Fashion Buying

    3 credits

    This capstone management course explores the management of the human system as it relates to organizations, society, and the global market.  The functions of strategic planning, organizational engineering and structuring, directing, and controlling are applied to the management decision-making process especially through the use of teams and the theory of The Learning Organization.  Self-managing teams develop and critique real business problems and situations via case studies using the resources of the sophisticated technologically advanced management learning environment.  Students may use financial ratios.  Students document their learning through portfolios.

    Prerequisites: FASH 105 - Introduction to the Fashion Industry  or FASH 108 - History of 20th Century Fashion  
    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • FASH 220 - Apparel and Design 1

    3 credits

    Students learn to drape intricate garments. Projects include draping rousers, notch and shawl collar jackets, dolman sleeves, and skirt variations. Original design is executed from a sketch and a sample garment is constructed. Material costs and lab fees apply.

    Notes: Material costs and lab fees apply.

    Prerequisites: FASH 120 - Garment Construction  
  
  • FASH 221 - Apparel and Design 2

    3 credits

    Continuation of more advanced draping problems. Includes draping in a variety of fabrics. Original designs for lingerie, knitwear, tailored jacket and term garments are draped and constructed in fabric. Material costs and lab fees apply.

    Notes: Material costs and lab fees apply.

    Prerequisites: FASH 220 - Apparel and Design 1  
  
  • FASH 230 - Fashion Illustration Techniques

    3 credits

    Fashion Illustration Techniques aims to develop the skills necessary to communicate fashion visions involved in the development of fashion products from concept to design. This course provides basic knowledge of drawing the fashion figure and the illustration of apparel products, as well as the development and exploration of the art and history of the fashion illustration and its place in the design process. Students will master the ability to build and render garments while exploring the expression of drama, attitude, and style using traditional and nontraditional art materials. 

  
  • FASH 231 - Fashion Product Development

    3 credits

    Fashion Product Development is a comprehensive course outlining the step-by-step process of developing concept into product within the apparel industry culminating in the completion of a portfolio of work exhibiting this experience. Students will analyze and experience different fashion professional careers as they operate within an apparel company, including taking on such roles as design, production, merchandising, marketing, etc., examining how the environment, socio-economic, and political atmosphere affect the industry.


Film

  
  • FILM 100 - Introduction to Film

    3 credits

    Introduces students to the key elements of film language: narrative, cinematography, mise-en-scène, editing, and sound. Explores the ways in which filmmakers employ these elements to reveal character, convey plot and theme, and create meaning. Emphasizes scene analysis as an approach to critical film study, with a primary focus on fictional narrative films.

  
  • FILM 101 - Film 1895 to 1945

    3 credits

    An historical and critical survey of the art of the motion picture from its inception through the Hollywood studio years and World War II. The course will introduce students to the major technological, aesthetic, and industrial developments of various national cinemas. Historical development of major styles and genres will be explored. Emphasis will be on teaching students the skills necessary to critically analyze films.

    Prerequisites:  FILM 100 - Introduction to Film  
  
  • FILM 102 - Film 1945 to Present

    3 credits

    An historical and critical survey of films beginning with World War II to the present. Students will explore the major works and movements of modern cinema, including Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave and the New Hollywood era. Close attention will be paid to the development of film as an art from within a wider cultural and aesthetic context. The focus will be on developing the skills necessary for the critical analysis of films.

    Pre or Corequisites: FILM 100 - Introduction to Film  

  
  • FILM 103 - The Great Directors

    3 credits

    Studies movies from the perspective of the director as “auteur” or primary creative force. Works of several directors will be examined in comparison to that of their peers. Discussions will center on the stylistic and thematic characteristics of individual directors, particularly as they relate to issues of race, class and gender.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • FILM 109 - Film – American Cinema

    3 credits

    Students approach film as an art form, an industry, and a system of representation and communication. They study the important role of movies in our culture, learning how Hollywood has helped to reflect and shape our national image throughout history.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors.

    Not offered every semester.
  
  • FILM 110H - Cinema Studies - Honors

    3 credits

    A comprehensive honors-level survey of the theory and methodology of cinematic studies, this course familiarizes students with the key elements of cinema (narrative, cinematography, mise-en-scene, editing, sound) and examines some of the critical lenses through which films are analyzed (including Feminist theory and Freudian theory). Students learn to critically analyze films and effectively communicate ideas in writing. A twelve-page analytical research paper is required.

    Prerequisites: Permission from the Honors College Director is required for enrollment.
  
  • FILM 113 - Film Study: World Cinema

    3 credits

    This course explores the way historical, aesthetic, and economic factors influence the evolution of global cinema by examining feature films from a wide array of eras and countries. Students will learn to watch films actively and analytically, describe how films contribute to the formation of individual, local, national and cultural identity, and question their own roles in an increasingly multicultural, globally conscious audience.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • FILM 125 - Writing for Film

    3 credits

    This course teaches the technical and aesthetic foundations of screenwriting. Students learn standard screenplay formatting as well as techniques for writing flashbacks, montages, parallel actions and telephone conversations. In addition, the course provides a foundation in narrative theory, in particular three-act structure. Presentations, exercises and demonstrations focus on visual narratives and dialog. Methods of instruction will include lectures, discussions, mulit-media presentations, film screenings, individual and group writing assignments and workshops.




     

    Notes: This course was listed as ENG 125 prior to Fall 2015.

    Pre or Corequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research 

  
  • FILM 130 - Digital Storytelling

    3 credits

    This hands-on course centers on telling stories using video. Students work individually and in groups to produce, edit, and output original short films using point-and-shoot cameras and entry-level, non-linear editing software. Topics include storytelling, shot composition, storyboarding, shot listing, audio recording, editing, and workflow.

  
  • FILM 140 - Video Production

    3 credits

    This hands-on course focuses on the technical aspects of digital video production. Students work in teams to produce short fiction films using single camera techniques. Topics include cinematography, lighting, location, sound, casting, pre-production, production and post-production. 

    Notes: This course was listed as ART 182 prior to Fall 2015.

    Prerequisites: FILM 130 Digital Storytelling  
  
  • FILM 142 - Video Editing

    3 credits

    This course focuses on technical and aesthetic aspects of digital video editing. Using Final Cut Pro software, students learn how to edit fiction and non-fiction from found footage and/or their own material. Through study of historical and contemporary films, students gain an understanding of editing styles and techniques.

    Notes: This course was listed as ART 151A Digital Video 1 prior to Fall 2015.

  
  • FILM 143 - Advanced Video Editing

    3 credits

    This course focuses on technical and aesthetic aspects of non-linear digital video editing. Using Adobe Premiere, students learn how to edit fiction, and non-fiction forms, working from their own material, as well as from found footage. Topics include basic editing, sound editing, color correction, media management and exporting.

    Prerequisites: FILM 142 Video Editing .
  
  • FILM 145 - Documentary Video

    3 credits

    This course focuses on the technical aspects of documentary storytelling, introducing students to the fundamentals of researching, planning, shooting and editing short documentaries. Students will also explore the social and ethical issues that underpin the documentary film genre and gain perspective into aesthetic and historical antecedents. Students will build documentary filmmaking skills through a series of assignments, including short video and audio projects and a longer team-produced documentary.

    Prerequisites: FILM 130 - Digital Storytelling  or COMM 106 - Multimedia Journalism 1  
  
  • FILM 150 - Film Internship

    3 credits

    The Film Internship is designed to promote career awareness through work experience in the film and TV business, or a related field. The student will engage in a supervised work experience evaluated by the employer, in conjunction with a faculty supervisor. The student will meet periodically with the faculty supervisor and will be expected to turn in a final paper or video demonstration.

    Prerequisites: GPA of 2.5 or higher and permission of the instructor
  
  • FILM 160 - Visual Effects

    3 credits

    This course will introduce students to the fundamental skills used in the Visual Effects, including compositing, key framing and filter effects. Using Adobe After Effects, the emphasis will be on working with live action footage. 

    Prerequisites: FILM 130 - Digital Storytelling  
  
  • FILM 220 - Fiction Into Film

    3 credits

    This course approaches film as literature, one of the most popular and important forms of storytelling in our culture today. Students learn about the elements of fiction that link filmmaking to traditional literature as well as the technical and artistic features that make film so distinctive. By examining the heroes, stories, and cultural values at work in the movies, students learn how to become more informed, critical, creative viewers of fiction film.

    Notes: This course was listed as ENG 220 prior to Fall 2015. May be taken for Honors.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  and ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
    Not offered every semester.

Finance

  
  • FIN 203 - Managerial Finance

    3 credits

    An examination of the goal of financial management within an analytical computer framework. Topics include decision-making techniques for managing long- and short-term assets of a firm, short- and long-term sources of funds, capital budgeting, time value of money, and cost of capital. The course uses Excel spreadsheets in the analysis of topics.

    Prerequisites: ACC 120 Managerial Accounting  and CIS 110 Computer Information Systems .
  
  • FIN 210 - Fundamentals of Investments

    3 credits

    Introduction to the analysis of investment media and to the basic concepts and principles of investing. The course examines investment policies, types of securities, factors that influence price changes, timing of purchases and sales, preparing investment programs to meet objectives, investment risk and return, and portfolio balancing. Emphasis is given to determinants of growth, safety, and income, and to problems involved in achieving those objectives.

    Notes: $20 fee

    Prerequisites: ACC 120 - Managerial Accounting  
  
  • FIN 215 - Financial Statement Analysis

    3 credits

    This course examines how to use financial statements, reports, and related footnotes to make assessments on publicly traded companies.  Students learn to evaluate the quality of financial information, and analyze financial position in terms of liquidity, solvency, risk, and profitability. Strategic and prospective analysis is examined as well as techniques for valuing companies.

    Notes: $20 fee

    Prerequisites: ACC 120 - Managerial Accounting  

Food Service Administration — Culinary Arts & Management

  
  • CULIN 101 - Exploring Culinary Arts

    3 credits

    This course serves as in introduction to the hospitality industry while assisting students with the transition to college and coursework demands and expectations. Students will explore ways of learning, focusing on math, measurements, and composition, through various culinary food labs. Students who master these skills will be prepared to pursue a major in the hospitality program. 

    Notes: This course is intended for students enrolled in developmental courses, to prepare them for entrance into the program.

    Pre or Corequisites: ENG 91 - Writing for College 1 ,  or READ 93 - Foundations of College Reading , or MATH 92 - Prealgebra  or any comination thereof. 

  
  
  • CULIN 112 - Principles of Food Preparation (Lab)

    2 credits

    Application of the scientific principles underlying correct preparation and handling of fruits, beverages, vegetables, salads, salad dressings, eggs and egg products, meat, poultry, fish, cereals, baked products, and starch-thickened products. Emphasis is placed on the correct techniques of handling, preparing, and presenting food; application of the principles of sanitation and safety; operation and cleaning of food preparation equipment.

    Corequisite: CULIN 111 Principles of Food Preparation (Lecture) 
    Pre or Corequisites: HOSP 115 - Introduction to the Hospitality Industry  

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  
  • CULIN 124 - Quantity of Food Production (Lab)

    2 credits

    Application of the principles and practices of quantity food production, including hospitality mathematical concepts, through the planning and preparation of menus and recipes suitable for volume preparation. Students rotate through all kitchen stations and serve as Chef/Manager for the day during the semester. Students gain experience in the application of the principles of sanitation and safety in quantity food production.

    Corequisite: CULIN 123 Quantity of Food Production (Lecture)  
    Offered spring semester.
  
  
  
  
  
  • HOSP 115 - Introduction to the Hospitality Industry

    2 credits

    A review of the history, growth and development of the hospitality industry, including major objectives and career opportunities. This course also serves as an introduction to topics covered in subsequent coursework.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  and Math Level 1-Ready  
    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  
  
  
  
  • HOSP 224 - Hospitality Human Resources Seminar

    2 credits

    Topics pertaining to the training and responsibilities of Hospitality Industry Human Resources professionals, including current regulations, requirements, laws, policies and procedures are addressed through readings and presentations of guest lecturers. Students are prepared for the Manage First Hospitality and Human Resources certification exam. Students are obligated to fulfill their degree work experience requirements at an approved job in the hospitality industry. A written report based on the students’ experiences, following specified guidelines, is an integral part of this class.

    Prerequisites: CULIN 123 - Quantity of Food Production (Lecture)  and CULIN 124 - Quantity of Food Production (Lab)  
    Offered spring semester.

Food Service Administration — Dietetic Technician (Nutrition Care) and Foods and Nutrition

  
  • NUTR 101 - Foundations of Nutrition

    3 credits

    A study of the nutrients, their functions, sources, requirements and utilization. Special topics include nutritional needs of pregnant women, the athlete, and the vegetarian.

    Notes: Open to all students.

  
  • NUTR 107 - Dietetic Seminar

    1 credits

    Topics related to professional organizations and obligations; preparation for employment.

    Notes: Recommended as a fourth semester course.

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • NUTR 109 - Nutrition for Health Care

    3 credits

    Introduction to the process of assessing nutritional status; a study of the nutrients, their functions, sources, requirements, and utilization in the body across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on the role of the health care practitioner.

    Offered spring and fall semesters.
  
  • NUTR 118 - Principles of Teaching Health Care

    3 credits

    Application of the educative process in the teaching of health care to individuals and groups; principles of interviewing and counseling, considering the patient/client as an individual influenced by a multiplicity of psychological, sociological, and economic influences, in addition to the stresses of illness and hospitalization; methods of planning, implementing, and evaluating group and individual instruction.

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • NUTR 119 - Nutrition Through Lifecycle

    3 credits

    Understand basic nutritional assessment, identify nutritional requirements and nutrition therapy for various stages in the Lifecycle. Course topics cover process of nutrition assessment, steps in nutrition therapy, nutritional requirements for each stage in the life cycle – pre-conception to geriatrics.

    Prerequisites: NUTR 109 - Nutrition for Health Care  
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • NUTR 120 - Foods (and Lab)

    4 credits

    Important aspects of family and individual meal planning, purchasing and preparation of food, considering the scientific principles underlying preparation of palatable and nutritious food, vegetarianism, selected cultural and religious patterns of eating; sanitation and safety in food preparation.

    Notes: Thers is a uniform requirement for this class.

    Prerequisites: For their own safety and the safety of others in the class, students must be capable of the following basic skills and behavioral standards which are necessary for successful completion of this course. Students should not enroll in this course if they believe they cannot meet the following criteria.

    1. Able to focus on the “task at hand.”  
          a. Attention to an open flame while cooking on a gas stove.
          b. Attention when handling knives and sharp culinary equipment.
    2. Able to perform tasks requiring manual dexterity while using equipment in the culinary labs.
    3. Able to function in a fast-paced and crowded work environment.
    4. Able to observe safety procedures.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • NUTR 123 - Food Service Systems Management

    3 credits

    An overview of the principles of food service management, including development of leadership, menu planning, safety and sanitation; a practical approach to equipment and layout, purchasing, storage, and inventory; current labor problems; computer applications.

    Prerequisites: NUTR 120 - Foods (and Lab) 
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • NUTR 206 - Introduction to Medical Nutrition Management

    3 credits

    Medical nutrition therapy as a factor in the prevention and treatment of disease. Rationale and characteristics of diets modified in calories, protein, carbohydrate, fat, sodium, and other nutrients; planning, calculating and adjusting menus and other intervention modalities.

    Prerequisites: NUTR 119 - Nutrition Through Lifecycle  and BIOL 121 - Anatomy and Physiology 1 (and Lab)   
  
  • NUTR 211 - Introduction to Nutrition Care

    1 credits

    An exploration of the profession of dietetics and professional opportunities available in various work settings, with emphasis on the role of dietitians and technicians in health care facilities.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • NUTR 245 - Clinical Practicum 2

    4 credits

    Application of the theory learned in NUTR 205 Introduction to Medical Nutrition Management  to the care of hospitalized patients, requiring diets modified in protein, carbohydrate, fat, calories, sodium and other nutrients; planning menus; assisting patients in the selection of menus; evaluating food intake of patients’ charts to collect information; obtaining a diet history and using it as a basis for teaching principles and characteristics of medical nutrition therapy.

    Notes: NUTR 205 Introduction to Medical Nutrition Management  must be taken before or with this class. Clinical hrs: 12.

    Prerequisites: NUTR 145 Clinical Practicum 1 .
    Pre or Corequisites: Pre- or Corequisite:  NUTR 205 Introduction to Medical Nutrition Management .

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • NUTR 247 - Clinical Practicum 3

    4 credits

    Application of management and clinical principles related to the provision of nutrition care as practiced by the dietetic technician.

    Prerequisites: NUTR 245 Clinical Practicum 2  or departmental permission.
    Pre or Corequisites: Pre- or Corequisite: NUTR 123 Food Service Systems Management .

    Offered spring semester.

French

  
  • FREN 101 - Elementary French 1

    4 credits

    This introductory course for beginning students of French develops the four language communication skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. It introduces basic vocabulary and grammar and provides opportunities for students to enhance their understanding and appreciation of the French culture.

    Notes: No more than one year of high school French.

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  
  • FREN 103 - Beginning French Conversation 1

    3 credits

    Basic conversation course for beginners, which emphasizes the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing using real life situations.

    Offered summer semester.
  
  • FREN 201 - Intermediate French 1

    3 credits

    This is an intermediate level French course for students who have completed at least three years of high school French, French 102, or the equivalent. It provides students with an opportunity to develop their linguistic as well as communicative competencies in French based on readings of a literary and cultural nature while providing for additional review of grammar in the context of the reading selections. This course is conducted in French.

    Prerequisites: FREN 102 Elementary French 2  or equivalent.
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • FREN 203 - Intermediate French Conversation 1

    3 credits

    Designed to provide the student with an opportunity to further master basic vocabulary, structures, and idiomatic expressions through readings, discussions, and role-playing. This course is conducted in French.

    Prerequisites: FREN 201 Intermediate French 1  or the equivalent.
    Offered spring semester.

Geography

  
  • GEOG 101 - World Geography

    3 credits

    This course provides an introductory survey of the study of geography as a social science which emphasizes the relevance of geographic concepts to human problems. Attention is focused on peoples, cultures and resources within a global context. Maps are used extensively throughout the course.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101  

German

  
  • GER 101 - Elementary German 1

    4 credits

    This introductory course for beginning students of German develops the four language communication skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. It introduces basic vocabulary and grammar and provides opportunities for students to enhance their understanding and appreciation of the German culture.

    Notes: No more than one year of high school German.

    Offered fall semester. modern language or elective credits
  

Health & Human Performance

  
  • HHP 101 - Personal Training

    3 credits

    This course will prepare and qualify students to work as personal trainers. Students will learn to: properly screen and evaluate clients for safe participation in an exercise program, design and implement exercise prescriptions for multiple populations an goal attainment, and apply the principles of exercise in a personal training environment. The professional Personal Training credential is available through the National Council on Strength and Fitness.

    Corequisite: HHP 102 - Personal Training Internship  
    Prerequisites: BIOL 121 - Anatomy and Physiology 1 (and Lab)  
  
  • HHP 102 - Personal Training Internship

    1 credits

    This internship will allow students to apply knowledge and skills learned in the capstone course (HHP 101 ) in a professional fitness setting, under the guidance of fitness professionals. Instruction will include discussion and observation of facilities management and safety; it will include direct observation and participation at on off-campus facility. (*Available only to students who take HHP 101 ; placement must be approved by the Curriculum Chair.)

    Corequisite: HHP 101 - Personal Training  
  
  • HHP 120 - Trends in Fitness & Human Performance

    1 credits

    This course introduces students to the most current concepts, trends and programs in: personal fitness, group fitness, sports performance and functional training. Students will learn basic fundamentals of each fitness discipline through discussion and the use of cardiovascular equipment, traditional free weights, and fitness machines.

  
  • HHP 130 - Fitness Assessment and Prescription

    3 credits

    This course will examine diverse aspects of exercise testing, fitness assessment, body composition analysis, muscular endurance assessment, and flexibility. Students will be instructed how to assess, interpret the findings of the assessments, and use the information to create specific exercise prescriptions for various populations.

  
  • HHP 140 - Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries

    3 credits

    This course focuses on the prevention, recognition, treatment, rehabilitation, and basic care of
    sports injuries. It is designed for students intending to pursue careers in coaching, athletic
    training, fitness, physical education, or other areas related to exercise science and sports science.
    Topics include: the evaluation and care of injuries, sports nutrition, physical fitness, legal
    responsibilities, substance abuse, and wrapping and taping techniques.

  
  • HHP 150 - Foundations of Coaching

    3 credits

    The course will familiarize students with primary concepts common to all sports. It will focus on essential philosophies, theories, and methods for planning, organizing and managing athletic programs. The development of individual and team fundamentals, team strategies, offensive and defensive skills, and the overall administration of a youth, high school or college program will be emphasized.

  
  • HHP 160 - Principles of Athletic Training

    3 credits

    This introductory course is designed for initial exposure to the athletic training profession. The
    student will gain insight into the profession, the preparation, and the role of the athletic healthcare
    professional in various settings. This course will also introduce students to basic clinical
    techniques in the prevention and management of athletic injuries.

  
  • HHP 200 - Exercise Physiology & Lab

    4 credits

    This course will study the response of the human body to physical activity, exercise and stress. It will examine the affects of: acute and repeated bouts of exercise, environmental factors, gender and age on metabolic, neuromuscular, cardiovascular and respiratory function. The affect of physical activity upon disease, prevention and rehabilitation will be discussed. (*Recommended for students who plan to work in an existing fitness facility.)

    Prerequisites: BIOL 121 - Anatomy and Physiology 1 (and Lab)  
  
  • HHP 220 - Kinesiology

    3 credits

    Students will examine the biomechanical basis of movement in sport and exercise, and will identify essential elements for basic motor skills. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between the skeletal & neuromuscular systems, and how these systems affect both coordinated movement and athletic performance.

    Prerequisites: BIOL 121 - Anatomy and Physiology 1 (and Lab)  
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9