May 30, 2024  
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog 
    
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Students should consult with their curriculum chair or counselor when selecting courses to satisfy program requirements. Please note: The honors versions of courses satisfy the same requirements as the non-honors versions.

 

Physical Education — Sports

Physical Education credits can be earned by taking courses that begin with the prefixes PEC, PEH, PES, and DANCE.

  
  • PE 169 - Volleyball - Tennis

    1 credits


Physical Sciences

  
  • PHYSC 111 - College Physics 1 (plus required lab and workshop)

    4 credits

    An introduction to the principles of mechanics and heat. Topics included are: kinematics, Newton’s Laws of Motion, gravity, projectile motion, work, energy, momentum, heat, temperature, and thermodynamics. Comprehension of the basic principles of physics and their application to problem solving is stressed. Algebra and trigonometry are used extensively. Laboratory experiments are performed on the topics covered.

    Prerequisites: MATH 161 - Precalculus (Functions and Coordinate Geometry) ; OR MATH 181 - Calculus 1 ; OR MATH 191 - Calculus 2  with minimum grade of C or higher; OR permission of department chair
  
  
  • PHYSC 120 - Physical Science Explorations

    3 credits

    An introduction to the physical sciences geared towards the non-science student. This class is an introduction to critical thinking and a survey of modern science wrapped into one package. Students will learn what science really is and how to survey the world through the lens of scientific scrutiny. A foundation in the ideas of physics, natural hazards, and climate change will be provided. While the course is largely conceptual, basic mathematical skills will be used. 

  
  • PHYSC 121 - Engineering Physics 1 (and Lab)

    5 credits

    An introduction to principles of Mechanics, Oscillations, and Acoustic Waves. Topics included are: Kinematics and Dynamics, Work, Energy, Momentum, Hydrostatics, Hydrodynamics, Elasticity, Simple Harmonic Oscillator, Elastic Waves, Superposition Principle, Interference and qualitative discussions of special relativity. Laboratory exercises are performed on the topics covered.

    Notes: Was PHYSC 101B and 102B previous to Fall 2010.

    Corequisite: MATH 181 Calculus 1 .
    Prerequisites: MATH 161 Precalculus (Functions and Coordinate Geometry) .
    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • PHYSC 122 - Engineering Physics 2 (and Lab)

    5 credits

    An introduction to the principles of thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases, electricity, magnetism, and optics. Topics included are: temperature, thermal expansion, calorimetry, heat transfer, laws of thermodynamics, electrostatics, Coulomb’s Law, electric field, Gauss’s Law, electric potential, capacitance, dielectrics, current resistance, and electromotive force, direct current circuits, magnetic field, inductance, alternating currents, electromagnetic waves, an introduction to the principles of geometrical and physical optics, quantum mechanics and atomic physics.

    Notes: Was PHYSC 103B/104B previous to Fall 2010.

    Corequisite: MATH 191 Calculus 2  
    Prerequisites: PHYSC 121 Engineering Physics 1 (and Lab)  
    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • PHYSC 129 - Introduction to Oceanography (and Lab)

    4 credits


     

    An introductory survey of the science of physical oceanography. This course covers the origin of the Earth’s oceans from a planetary perspective, and the history of the science of oceanography. Additional course subject matter includes: chemical properties of seawater, ocean-atmospheric interactions, global climate change, seafloor features, ocean waves, tides, currents, marine geology, coastal processes, continental drift, plate tectonics, types and interrelation of marine organisms, ocean resources, marine pollution, and ocean environmental issues.

  
  • PHYSC 130 - Physics Survey for Technicians

    4 credits

    A survey of the principles of physics for students in technology and applied science. This course exposes technology student to the study of mechanics, thermodynamics, electromagnetism and modern physics, with an emphasis on electronics and electromagnetic radiation. A prep course for future physics coursework. Not designed for transfer. Registration in lecture (3 hours) and lab (2 hours) is required.

  
  • PHYSC 131 - Physics for Telecommunications/Verizon

    4 credits

    A study of the physical principles relevant to the telecommunications field. This course teaches problem-solving techniques in basic mechanics and optics. It also covers, with a more qualitative approach, the subjects of thermodynamics, waves, electricity and magnetism, and modern physics.

    Notes: Was PHYSC 112 prior to Fall 2010.

  
  • PHYSC 134H - Science, Pseudoscience and Critical Thinking - Honors

    3 credits

    A reading and discussion intensive course that provides the non-science major with the framework to explore how modern scientists develop and examine their ideas. The course will focus on non-mathematical explorations of critical thinking techniques, scientific methods, pseudoscience and extraordinary claims, peer review, hypothesis testing, the media portrayal of science, and why a scientific theory is not “just a theory.”

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready 
  
  • PHYSC 143 - Earth Science (and Lab)

    4 credits

    Provides non-science majors with a geological understanding of the planet we inhabit. Students study Earth’s physical environment, resources, natural hazards, and geological history. The course includes an investigation of dynamic Earth processes such as weathering, glaciation, running water, earthquakes, volcanic activity, and plate tectonics.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors credit with the successful completion of a college-level algebra course (with a grade of “B” or better) and  approval from the Honors Program co-directors.


  
  • PHYSC 143H - Earth Science - Honors (and Lab)

    4 credits

    An enhanced honors version of PHYSC 143 , this course provides students with an understanding of the planet we inhabit. Students study Earth’s physical environment, rocks and minerals, natural hazards, geological history, and the fossil record. The course includes an investigation of dynamic Earth processes such as weathering, glaciation, flooding, earthquakes, volcanic activity, plate tectonics, and climate change. Please note that this is an honors version of the regular course – additional topics will be covered and topics will be covered in greater depth.  

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of College Algebra or equivalent.
    fall
  
  • PHYSC 145 - Weather and Forecasting (and Lab)

    4 credits

    A course for the non-science major designed to introduce the student to elements of weather, meteorology, and weather forecasting with a non-mathematical approach. Topics include radiation and heating of the atmosphere, forces and wind, the general circulation, moisture and stability, fronts and cyclones. The student is introduced to basic forecast methods utilizing charts, data, radar, and satellite imagery. Contemporary topics of global warming, ozone depletion, air pollution, and El Niño are also addressed.

    Offered every fall and spring semester.

  
  • PHYSC 151 - Astronomy (and Lab)

    4 credits

    A general education introduction to the fundamentals of astronomy. This course examines how modern scientists have developed accurate models of the structure and organization of the Universe through observation and experimentation. Emphasis is placed on stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Other topics include the daily and seasonal appearance of the day and nighttime skies and the nature of light and gravity. Laboratory activities utilize computer simulations, and original data collection and analysis.

    Prerequisites: Passing score on reading entrance exam or C or better in READ 105 Analytical Reading .
  
  • PHYSC 154H - Life in the Universe - Honors

    4 credits

    An approach to the science of life beyond Earth, from the viewpoint of various physical sciences. Emphasis is on the physical processes that shape our understanding of life and the habitability of terrestrial planets. Specific topics include: the possibility of life within our solar system, planetary atmospheres and geophysics, the search for extra-solar planets, the feasibility of inter-stellar travel, and the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence. The social and philosophical implications of the course material is discussed. Lab activities include physics and geology investigations, as well as a class field trip.

  
  • PHYSC 162 - Climate Change and Our Future

    3 credits


     

    Ideal for non-science or science majors, this course covers all aspects of climate change, both past and present, and prediction of future climate change. Students learn about how climate science works and how we measure climate changes including the effects of a warming world on rain, snow, clouds, atmospheric circulation and storms, ice sheets and sea ice, sea level, and ocean circulation. Topics include the workings of the atmosphere and the greenhouse effect. Course will also examine climate policy, economic, and technological solutions to reduce carbon emissions.

  
  • PHYSC 165 - Principles of Energy

    3 credits

    An introduction to the production and use of conventional and alternative energy resources. Topics include renewable energy resources (solar, wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal), passive and active solar energy building designs and home energy efficiency, nuclear power and fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas). Modern approaches to energy efficiency and electricity production and storage (e.g., hydrogen fuel cells) and the effects of energy use on the environment will also be examined.

    Offered every fall and spring semester.
  
  • PHYSC 167 - The Solar System - Lecture

    3 credits

    A tour of the solar system from the viewpoint of various physical sciences (astronomy, geology, and physics). Students learn about the structure and formation of the solar system, and the varied characteristics of the different  planets and moons that inhabit our solar system. Includes a historical background of the space program, an overview of the current search for extra-solar planets (planets in other solar systems), and a discussion of the possibilities for extra-terrestrial  life within our solar system and the Universe.

    Prerequisites: Student must be considered ready for MATH 93 Beginning Algebra 
  
  • PHYSC 168 - The Solar System Lab

    1 credits

    Students will learn how to think like a scientist- they will collect and analyze data from a variety of solar system data sources to answer research questions. Topics/data sources include the characteristics of planets and moons in our solar system, impact cratering, planets around stars other than the Sun (exoplanets), geologic features on the moon, and more.

    Notes: This is an optional 1-credit lab to accompany PHYSC 167 The Solar System - Lecture . Students who need a science course with a lab should register for both PHYSC 167 The Solar System - Lecture  and this lab course; students who do not need or want a lab should register for only PHYSC 167 The Solar System - Lecture .

    Corequisite: PHYSC 167 The Solar System - Lecture 
    Prerequisites: Basic Algebra Skills
  
  • PHYSC 205H - Cambridge Science - Honors

    3 credits

    Ten days of intensive study with Cambridge University professors and an on-site WCC Honors instructor. Studenst register for two specialized seminars in Science Summer School at Cambridge and attend one class per day, in addition to morning plenary and evening lectures. All written work is submitted to and graded by the WCC instructor. Certificate of Completion from Cambridge University; three WCC Honors Science (non-lab) credits.

  
  • PHYSC 271 - Special Project/Independent Study - A

    1 credits

    Special projects or independent study in physics or physical science supervised and evaluated, adapted to the needs and interests of qualified students. Content and evaluation to be determined by the Special Projects Committee of the Physical Sciences Department.

  
  • PHYSC 272 - Special Project/Independent Study - B

    2 credits

    Special projects or independent study in physics or physical science supervised and evaluated, adapted to the needs and interests of qualified students. Content and evaluation to be determined by the Special Projects Committee of the Physical Sciences Department.

  
  • PHYSC 273 - Special Project/Independent Study - C

    3 credits

    Special projects or independent study in physics or physical science supervised and evaluated, adapted to the needs and interests of qualified students. Content and evaluation to be determined by the Special Projects Committee of the Physical Sciences Department.

  
  • PHYSC 292 - Physical Geography (and Lab)

    4 credits


    Physical systems and landforms of the earth are studied. Climate, weather, geomorphology, plate tectonics and earth processes, and map reading are covered. A comparative study is made of the integrated use of resources and land, including climactic borders.

     

    Notes: Was PHYSC 292/292A prior to Fall 2010.

    Offered every fall and spring semester.


Political Science

  
  • POLSC 102 - American Government and Issues

    3 credits

    This course establishes the foundation of representative constitutional government in the context of modern political theory and details the structures and processes that underlie the functioning of the United States’ political system. Emphasis is placed on the social and legal resolution of current issues that challenge democratic governance especially in the areas of civil rights and social justice and competing notions of equality and liberty.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
  
  • POLSC 102H - American Government and Issues-Honors

    3 credits

    This course offers an introduction to the field of political science and the American political system. Students analyze the organization and working of American political institutions and current issues through the ideological perspective of centrist, liberal, conservative, radical left, and radical right positions.

    Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Honors Program and English 101-Ready  
  
  • POLSC 107 - State and Local Government

    3 credits

    This is a survey course in the structures and functions of government given to the states by the United States Constitution. Beginning with the concept of Federalism, the class explores the parallel legislative, executive, judicial and administrative law operation. Special emphasis will be placed on identifying and Resolving pressing infrastructural and superstructure issues of local communities with the goal of increasing popular participation in governance.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
  
  • POLSC 111 - Introduction to World Politics

    3 credits

    This course is designed to help the student understand international affairs and politics. Topics covered include realist vs. idealist theory, the balance of power, the role of ideology and leaders, the nation-state, why nations go to war, imperialism, regionalism, international law and organizations. Specific case studies and class simulations are used.

    Pre or Corequisites: Successful completion of prerequisite course ENG 92 - Writing for College 2  or ESL 122 - Introduction to Academic Writing 2 , or appropriate course placement. Alternatively, students may take this course if they have completed ENG 101 - Writing and Research  or are taking it as a corequisite.

  
  • POLSC 111H - Introduction to World Politics - Honors

    3 credits

    This course is designed to introduce students to the study of international affairs and politics. Topics covered include: realist verses idealist theory; levels of analysis; nationalism and internationalism; international law and organizations; international security; human rights, energy, and environmental issues. The course uses the seminar mode of instruction.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research .
  
  • POLSC 112H - International Law and Organizations-Honors

    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to international law, exploring the theories behind international law, the concept of the nation state and the formation of world organizations in the twentieth century, including the organs and agencies of the United Nations as well as prominent Non-Governmental organizations. It covers important current controversies on human rights, the environment, refugees, terrorism, war crimes and multinational corporations from an historical as well as legal perspective. Emphasis is placed on international problem solving and the issues of peacekeeping and dispute resolution. The student will learn legal terminology, case analysis and legal drafting.

    Prerequisites: One semester of Political Science, Social Science or History; ENG 101 - Writing and Research , ENG 102 - Writing and Literature .
  
  • POLSC 113 - Middle Eastern Politics

    3 credits

    This course introduces students to the modern political history of the Middle East. Students will learn the histories and the forces behind the formation of all the major nation-states in the region (Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and the rest of the Gulf States). We will examine the transformation of this region and these states with particular emphasis on its relationship with European and other ‘Western’ Powers. Lastly, we will study contemporary issues ranging from the role of Islam, the Arab-Israeli Conflict, oil production, and to the rise of local and international terrorism.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
  
  • POLSC 115 - Comparative Politics

    3 credits

    This course introduces the student to comparative politics, one of the four sub-fields in political science. As a field of study, comparative politics focuses on the diversity of political systems around the world. The field therefore encompasses a diverse array of topics, from competing forms of democracy to the nature of economic development. In this course, we will explore the political diversity of the world through a series of theoretically-informed case studies.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  

Psychology

  
  • PSYCH 101 - Introduction to Psychology

    3 credits

    An introduction to psychological science. Core topics include the theoretical perspectives of psychology, research methodology, neuroscience, sensation and perception, motivation and emotion, learning, and memory. Other topics may be added at the instructor’s discretion. While primarily a lecture and discussion course, other pedagogies including online testing and assignments may be used.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
  
  • PSYCH 101H - Introduction to Psychology - Honors

    3 credits

    An introduction to psychology as a natural science designed for Honors students. Two primary foci distinguish the course as an Honors course: critical analysis of psychological science in terms of research methodology, and application of the five major theoretical perspectives of psychology to phenomena. Core topics include, but are not limited to, neuroscience, sensation and perception, learning, memory, motivation, and emotion.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research .
  
  • PSYCH 103 - Abnormal Psychology

    3 credits

    This course provides an introduction to psychopathology with an emphasis on the continuum that exists between normal and abnormal behavior. Clinical and experimental approaches to a wide range of behavior disorders are examined. Statistical, psychodynamic, cognitive/behavioral, sociocultural, humanistic/existential and biological models are discussed. Issues relevant to epidemiology, etiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of maladaptive behavior are explored. Community attitudes and responses to various disorders, as well as ethical and legal issues, are considered.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 103H - Abnormal Psychology - Honors

    3 credits

    This course focuses on scientific and clinical understandings of major psychological disorders, including anxiety disorders, PTSD, mood disorders, schizophrenias and psychosis, and personality disorders. The biological, psychological and social factors that have been implicated by these disorders are explored. The highlight of the course is an amateur clinical case conference in which students present case studies of individuals suffering from these disorders.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 107 - Social Psychology

    3 credits

    The scientific study of the numerous ways that other people influence our thoughts, emotions and behaviors. One of the main themes in the course is the constant tension between being an individual and yet being subject to pressures from others. Students learn to analyze these situational forces that impinge on their everyday lives and in the process become able to choose how to respond.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 109 - Child Development

    3 credits

    Theoretical and empirical findings in child and developmental psychology from infancy to pre-adolescence are studied. Emphasis is placed on theories of development and factors facilitating and inhibiting human development.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 110 - Adolescent Development

    3 credits

    A survey course focusing on adolescent behavior and development, with a particular emphasis on theoretical issues and empirical findings in the social, cognitive, personality, and emotional development of contemporary adolescents. Furthermore, issues of special relevance for adolescents, such as peer pressure, sexuality, drugs, identity, and social relationships are explored.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 111 - Human Sexuality

    3 credits

    This course discusses the biological, psychological and cultural aspects of sexuality. Students become familiar with the reproductive structures and their functions as well as how personal, familial, and cultural factors influence how sexuality is treated and understood. Students also develop a historical view of how attitudes regarding sexuality have changed over time and how the topic has been researched and studied.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 112H - Personality - Honors

    3 credits

    This course will focus on the individual and the various theories that explain both the commonalities and the unique qualities that make up our personalities. The following theoretical perspectives will be covered: psychoanalytic-social, trait, biological, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic. Emphasis is on class discussion and seminar-style learning.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 - Introduction to Psychology  and acceptance into the college’s Honors Program.
  
  • PSYCH 113 - Stress & Self-Management

    3 credits

    This course explores stress from biobehavioral, psychosocial and cultural perspectives. The philosophies of holistic health and integrative medicine and the psychology of self-management guide students to a personal awareness of stressors and ways to cope more efficiently with them. Research issues relevant to the field are considered, along with empirically validated cognitive-behavioral change techniques and mind-body disciplines. Each student receives individual guidance to plan and implement a personally chosen behavior change project to enable him/her to manage stress more optimally.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 114 - Developmental Psychology: Adult & Aging

    3 credits

    This course is a survey course focusing on human development from early adulthood through the end of the life span. It emphasizes theoretical issues and empirical findings in the areas of social, cognitive, personality, and emotional developmental with special examination of the impact of the changing demographics on our lives, e.g., work and retirement patterns and health issues related to advanced years.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 116 - Lifespan Development

    3 credits

    This is a survey course focusing on human development from conception to death. Development in the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial domains is discussed in relation to traditional and contemporary theoretical perspectives, current social and ethical issues, and recent empirical findings.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 Introduction to Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 201 - Behavioral Statistics

    4 credits

    An introduction to data analysis in the behavioral sciences. Students will learn how to summarize data sets, create frequency distributions, formulate statistical hypothesis tests, and interpret the results of statistical tests. Topics covered include measures of central tendency and variability, standard scores, t-tests, analysis of variance, correlation, and chi-square tests. Designed to meet the statistics requirement for transfer students who will major in psychology.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 101 - Introduction to Psychology  with a grade of “C” or higher. And any college level MATH course with a grade of “C” or higher.
  
  • PSYCH 204 - Disorders of Childhood and Adolescence

    3 credits

    This course focuses on the development, diagnosis, and treatment of pathological, cognitive, emotional, and behavioral symptoms/disorders during childhood and adolescence; these include Autism Spectrum Disorder, developmental delays, learning disabilities, ADHD, depression, conduct disorders, trauma & maltreatment, as well as eating disorders. These topics will be explored using prevailing theories of development and mental illness as a guiding framework.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 103 Abnormal Psychology .
  
  • PSYCH 204H - Abnormal Psychology: Childhood and Adolescence

    3 credits

    This course focuses on the development of typical emotional and behavioral problems of childhood and adolescence, including autism and Asperger’s disorder, AD/HD, depression, trauma-related problems, eating disorders, and personality problems, clinical material will be an integral part of the course, including case studies, in-class case presentations, and video of psychopathology.

    Prerequisites: PSYCH 103 Abnormal Psychology  or PSYCH 103H Abnormal Psychology - Honors .

  
  • SS 103 - Applying Psychology

    3 credits

    This is a practical course designed to familiarize students with basic psychological principles and how to apply them to their everyday lives as college students. This will be explored within the context of psychological research and theory. Specific topics that will be covered include: stress management, learning and memory strategies, interpersonal relationships, effective goal planning, and happiness. Special emphasis will be placed on how multiple factors contribute to academic success. This course is designed as a foundation or “bridge course to be taken prior to enrollment in the range of behavioral science courses and cannot be used to satisfy behavioral sciences core requirements.


Radiologic Technology

  
  • RAD 101 - Radiographic Technique 1 (and Lab)

    4 credits

    Review of fundamentals of mathematics, units of measurement as they relate to radiologic physics and medical imaging. The structure of matter, basic electricity, magnetism, electrical physics, radiation physics, x-ray circuitry, x-ray tube, x-ray production, x-ray generating equipment and tube rating charts are discussed.

    Notes: Was RAD 101/102 previous to Fall 2010.

    Pre or Corequisites: Registered in Rad Tec plan.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning 1 (and Lab)

    4 credits

    Introduction to radiographic procedures and correct positioning terminology. Instruction in routine and special positions of upper and lower limbs, chest, abdomen, shoulder girdle and pelvic girdle and hip. Evaluation of radiographic procedures performed in lab is discussed. Use of radiographs in classroom is used to supplement positioning discussion and evaluation of case studies. Trauma radiography as it applies to the course topics is discussed.

    Notes: Was RAD 103/104 previous to Fall 2010.

    Pre or Corequisites: Registered in Rad Tec plan.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RAD 105 - Radiographic Technique 2 (and Lab)

    4 credits

    Principles of radiographic exposure, film and processing systems are discussed. The application of radiographic accessories include, film-screen combination, filters, grids, beam restrictors, radiographic quality principles and film critique. Technique systems including automatic exposure control (AEC) and technique charts are also discussed. Creating and analyzing of radiographic images.

    Notes: Was RAD 105/106 previous to Fall 2010.

    Pre or Corequisites: RAD 101 - Radiographic Technique 1 (and Lab)  

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RAD 107 - Radiographic Positioning 2 (and Lab)

    4 credits

    Positioning considerations and radiographic procedures for vertebral column, ribs, sternum, and skull. Procedural considerations for special views/trauma of each area are discussed.

    Notes: Was RAD 107/108 previous to Fall 2010.

    Pre or Corequisites: RAD 103 - Radiographic Positioning 1 (and Lab)  

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RAD 112 - Radiologic Terms, Ethics & Law

    2 credits

    Elements of medical terminology: prefixes, word roots, singular & plural forms. Spelling of medical terms classified as homonyms, interpretation of abbreviations, symbols and terms associated with each body system. Introduction to Ethics and Law in radiologic sciences. Case studies, patient rights, consent, medical records, medical negligence and standards of patient care are discussed. The role of the radiographer in maintaining and promoting professional conduct toward the patient are also discussed.

    Notes: Was RAD 228 previous to Fall 2010.

    Pre or Corequisites: Registered in Rad Tec plan.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RAD 114 - Radiologic Science Patient Care

    2 credits

    This course provides the student with the basic concepts of patient care, including consideration of the physical and psychological needs of the patient. Routine and emergency patient care procedures are described, patient care and safety, drug administration, vital signs, infection control procedures and venipuncture. The role of the radiographer in patient education is identified.

    Notes: Was RAD 245A previous to Fall 2010.

    Pre or Corequisites: Registered in Rad Tec plan.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RAD 116 - Intro to Radiation Protection

    1 credits

    Introduction to radiation units, radiation sources and levels, radiation protection guidelines, and protection of the patient, public, and radiographer. Radiation detection equipment, personnel monitoring and applicable federal and state laws governing radiation dose limits is discussed.

    Pre or Corequisites: Registered in Rad Tec plan.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RAD 141 - Clinical Education 1

    1 credits

    A well balanced competency-based clinical education allows the student to demonstrate proper application of the didactic knowledge with special emphasis on positioning the patient and application of exposure techniques. The clinical instructor provides supervision and evaluates the student’s positioning skills, professional attitude toward patient and clinical staff, application of their anatomic knowledge when viewing radiographs. Correct use of medical terminology and the application of radiation protection are evaluated.

    Pre or Corequisites: Registered in Rad Tec plan.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  
  
  • RAD 200 - Radiographic Technique 3

    3 credits

    This course reviews radiographic quality conversion factors as they relate to radiographic quality. It includes an introduction to fluoroscopic image intensification, television monitor and television imaging in forming fluoroscopic image, and tomographic principles. Also discussed are the principles involved with tube rating charts, sensitometry and its use in radiography, principles of quality control and assurance as they relate to federal and state laws and radiographic quality and H and D curves.

    Notes: Was RAD 201A previous to Fall 2010.

    Pre or Corequisites: RAD 105 - Radiographic Technique 2 (and Lab)  

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RAD 202 - Advanced Imaging

    2 credits

    This course is an introduction to television and the role it plays in digital imaging. Digital imaging topics are covered including computed radiography and digital radiography. Fundamentals of CT Scanning are covered, along with PACS information systems and their role in radiography.

    Pre or Corequisites: RAD 105 - Radiographic Technique 2 (and Lab)  

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RAD 203 - Radiographic Positioning 3

    3 credits

    This course provides various imaging procedures performed by radiographers and students in clinical practice. The course is designed to develop competency in procedures of the respiratory system, pediatrics, biliary, gastrointestinal, and urinary system. Medical and radiographic terms associated with each area are included. Student radiographers will become familiar with routine and non-routine procedures and contrast agents associated with each system in various clinical practice.

    Pre or Corequisites: RAD 107 - Radiographic Positioning 2 (and Lab)  

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RAD 207 - Special Radiographic Imaging

    4 credits

    This course introduces the student radiographer to special radiographic imaging procedures, equipment and the various types of contrast media. Also, a history of the origin of these studies and their medico-legal implications are discussed. Special imaging studies include: angiography, arthrography, hysterosalpingography, and mammography. Special imaging modalities, catheters, guide wires and other accessories are discussed. Students are expected to engage in individual case studies for class presentation. A written paper is required.

    Pre or Corequisites: RAD 203 Radiographic Positioning 3 

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RAD 221 - Radiographic Pathology

    2 credits

    This course introduces the student to pathological principles and classification of diseases. Application of contrast media is discussed. Terminology pertaining to diseases affecting the body systems and their radiographic significance are discussed. Radiographs are used to illustrate radiologic pathologies.

    Pre or Corequisites: RAD 112 - Radiologic Terms, Ethics & Law  

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RAD 223 - Sectional Anatomy

    3 credits

    An introduction to the cross sectional view of the human body. Sectional Anatomy is correlated both with longitudinal view and with scans (MRI and CAT). Material covers thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and brain ventricles.

    Notes: This course is for Radiation Technology students only.

    Pre or Corequisites: RAD 221 - Radiographic Pathology 

    Offered spring semester. For Radiologic Technology students only.
  
  • RAD 224 - Radiation Protection and Biology

    3 credits

    The principles of radiation protection as they pertain to CT scanning and advanced imaging modalities. Content provides an overview of the principles of the interaction of radiation with living systems. Radiation effects on molecules, cells, tissues and the body as a whole are presented. Factors affecting biological response are presented, including acute and chronic effects of radiation.

    Notes: This course is for Radiation Technology students only.

    Pre or Corequisites: RAD 221 - Radiographic Pathology

    Offered spring semester.
  
  
  

Reading and Study Skills

  
  • COLSC 100 - First-Year Seminar

    1 credits

    This course is designed to help first-year students acquire the skills and behaviors needed to have a successful college experience. Students will use these skills and behaviors to develop attitudes and strategies that promote academic and personal success. Students are encouraged to learn through participation in class and small group discussions, presentations, and reading assignments.

  
  • COLSC 101 - College Success

    3 credits

    This is an elective course designed to help students develop skills that are essential for academic and personal success. The course applies theory and practice from many academic disciplines. Students have the opportunity to apply these techniques to the tasks they face as college freshmen. Emphasis is on critical thinking, success strategies, goal setting, learning and memory theory, and study skills, with an emphasis on appreciation for cultural diversity.

  
  • READ 93 - Foundations of College Reading

    0 credits

    This course is designed to help students improve the reading comprehension skills, critical thinking skills, and study strategies needed to achieve a college-level reading proficiency and to succeed in college work. Students learn efficient textbook reading strategies and develop a college-level vocabulary. Literal comprehension is emphasized. Students are required to complete fifteen hours of work in the Academic Support Center over the course of the semester. Students are assigned to Foundations of College Reading based on the results of the placement exam.

    Notes: Course was formerly known as: College Reading & Study Skills.

    Offered every semester.
  
  • READ 105 - Analytical Reading

    3 credits

    This course will improve students’ academic literacy and enable them to comprehend college-level material to expand their knowledge across the disciplines. Students will read a variety of cross-cultural themed texts (including literature, philosophy, history, communication, and the social sciences) to gain a broader understanding of contemporary concerns of American and global societies. Critical reading and thinking skills will be emphasized through information literacy and writing. Class Hours: 3. Credits: 3 SUNY General Education Humanities credits. Prerequisite: READ 93 Foundations of College Reading or appropriate placement score (Acuplacer scaled score of 58-79). Offered every semester.

    Notes: Course was formerly known as: Advanced Reading.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of prerequisite course READ 93 Foundations of College Reading  or appropriate course placement.
    Offered every semester.

Respiratory Care

  
  • RESP 101A - Respiratory Care 1

    5 credits

    Provides theoretical knowledge and practical application of basic patient care, proper hospital decorum, organization and management of a respiratory care department, professional ethics and issues. Principles and procedures include medical gas delivery systems and related technology, aerosol therapy, medical records, oxygen analysis, chest physical therapy, and basic blood gas interpretation. Pathological conditions requiring the aforementioned therapeutic modalities also are addressed. Laboratory practicums include auscultation, patient body mechanics and positioning, basic physical assessment, sphygmomanometry, cylinders and piping systems, regulators and flow meters, O2 therapy, aerosol therapy, pulse oximetry, bedside spirometry, computer applications in Respiratory Care, and aerosol/humidity generators.

    Corequisite: RESP 141 Clinical Experience 1 .
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RESP 102 - Respiratory Care 1 Lab

    2 credits

    Provides theoretical knowledge and practical application of basic patient care, proper hospital decorum, organization and management of a respiratory care department, professional ethics and issues. Principles and procedures include medical gas delivery systems and related technology, aerosol therapy, medical records, oxygen analysis, chest physical therapy, and basic blood gas interpretation. Pathological conditions requiring the aforementioned therapeutic modalities also are addressed. Laboratory practicums include auscultation, patient body mechanics and positioning, basic physical assessment, sphygmomanometry, cylinders and piping systems, regulators and flow meters, O2 therapy, aerosol therapy, pulse oximetry, bedside spirometry, computer applications in Respiratory Care, and aerosol/humidity generators.

    Corequisite: RESP 141 Clinical Experience 1 .
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RESP 103A - Respiratory Care 2

    5 credits

    The principles of infection control and equipment decontamination, advanced patient assessment. Coverage of indications, contraindications, hazards, precautions, rationale and techniques of IPPB, and incentive spirometry. Introduction to continuous mechanical ventilation and basic monitoring of the patient on a ventilator. Certification in BLS-C, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is accomplished in this course as well. The last section of the course encompasses the utilization of all artificial airways including types, insertion, maintenance, complications, removal, and after care. Laboratory practicums include administration of IPPB treatments, incentive spirometry treatments, decontamination, re-assembly and packaging of equipment, and isolation procedures. Assembly of mechanical ventilators, mannequin performance of infant, child, and adult CPR/FBAO, insertion of artificial airways, tracheal aspiration, cuff management, and manual ventilation. The student is also introduced to fiberoptic bronchoscopy. May be taken for Honors.

    Corequisite: RESP 104 Respiratory Care 2 Lab  and RESP 143 Clinical Experience 2 .
    Prerequisites: RESP 101A Respiratory Care 1  and RESP 141 Clinical Experience 1 .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RESP 104 - Respiratory Care 2 Lab

    2 credits

    The principles of infection control and equipment decontamination, advanced patient assessment. Coverage of indications, contraindications, hazards, precautions, rationale and techniques of IPPB, and incentive spirometry. Introduction to continuous mechanical ventilation and basic monitoring of the patient on a ventilator. Certification in BLS-C, cardiopulmonary resuscitation, is accomplished in this course as well. The last section of the course encompasses the utilization of all artificial airways including types, insertion, maintenance, complications, removal, and after care. Laboratory practicums include administration of IPPB treatments, incentive spirometry treatments, decontamination, re-assembly and packaging of equipment, and isolation procedures. Assembly of mechanical ventilators, mannequin performance of infant, child, and adult CPR/FBAO, insertion of artificial airways, tracheal aspiration, cuff management, and manual ventilation. The student is also introduced to fiberoptic bronchoscopy. May be taken for Honors.

    Corequisite: RESP 104 Respiratory Care 2 Lab  and RESP 143 Clinical Experience 2 .
    Prerequisites: RESP 101A Respiratory Care 1  and RESP 141 Clinical Experience 1 .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RESP 141 - Clinical Experience 1

    1 credits

    Initial hospital introduction and application of material covered in RESP 101A Respiratory Care 1 . Clinical Education is provided by credentialed, college, clinical faculty. Evaluations include the cognitive, psycho-motor, and affective domains.

    Corequisite: RESP 101A Respiratory Care 1 .
    Offered fall semester.
  
  
  
  • RESP 201A - Respiratory Care 3

    6 credits

    The drawing and analysis of blood gases, their interpretation, blood gas physiology and pathophysiology, as well as the applicable instrumentation. Also covered is complete pulmonary function testing, including body plethysmography, spirometry, diffusion, and lung volumes. The setup, operation, and maintenance of equipment, as well as interpretation of data and its application to patient care. The final segment of this course covers the causes, diagnosis, and management of Acute Respiratory Failure. Emphasis is placed on the care of the patient requiring continuous mechanical ventilation and the patient-ventilator interface. Laboratory practicums include arterial punctures, arterial and venous vascular line maintenance, maintenance and proficiency testing of blood gas analyzers, flow-volume loops, carbon monoxide diffusion tests, lung volumes including FRC, ventilator circuit changes, application of contemporary ventilators to lung simulators, trouble-shooting patient-ventilator alarm situations, adjustment of ventilator parameters to specific clinical conditions, and critical care bedside spirometry. May be taken for Honors.

    Corequisite: RESP 202A Respiratory Care 3 Lab  and RESP 241 Clinical Experience 3 .
    Prerequisites:  RESP 103A Respiratory Care 2 , RESP 143 Clinical Experience 2 , and RESP 145 Summer Clinical Experience 1 .
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RESP 202A - Respiratory Care 3 Lab

    2 credits

    The drawing and analysis of blood gases, their interpretation, blood gas physiology and pathophysiology, as well as the applicable instrumentation. Also covered is complete pulmonary function testing, including body plethysmography, spirometry, diffusion, and lung volumes. The setup, operation, and maintenance of equipment, as well as interpretation of data and its application to patient care. The final segment of this course covers the causes, diagnosis, and management of Acute Respiratory Failure. Emphasis is placed on the care of the patient requiring continuous mechanical ventilation and the patient-ventilator interface. Laboratory practicums include arterial punctures, arterial and venous vascular line maintenance, maintenance and proficiency testing of blood gas analyzers, flow-volume loops, carbon monoxide diffusion tests, lung volumes including FRC, ventilator circuit changes, application of contemporary ventilators to lung simulators, trouble-shooting patient-ventilator alarm situations, adjustment of ventilator parameters to specific clinical conditions, and critical care bedside spirometry. May be taken for Honors.

    Corequisite: RESP 202A Lab and RESP 241 Clinical 3.
    Prerequisites: RESP 103A Respiratory Care 2, RESP 143 Clinical 2, and RESP 145 Summer Clinical 1.
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RESP 203A - Respiratory Care 4

    6 credits

    Covers invasive and non- invasive monitoring of the critically ill patient. Invasive studies include cardiac catheterization, arterial cannulation, and related hemodynamic monitoring. Non-invasive studies include oximetry, capnography, ECG monitoring and transcutaneous gas analysis. An intubation rotation is conducted where students develop proficiency in both intubation and extubation techniques. Neonatal and pediatric critical care, as well as general care, is covered, including high-risk delivery and transport, hyaline membrane disease, BPD, PFC, and other cardio-pulmonary dysfunctions peculiar to this population. The final segment of the course covers home care and rehabilitation. Laboratory practicums include application of an ECG arrhythmia simulator to an oscilloscope for interpretation and intervention; setup and maintenance of pulmonary artery catheters; interpretation of cardiovascular pressures; end-tidal CO2 analysis; VQ determinations; intubation/extubations on manikins; treadmill stress-testing; application, maintenance, and trouble-shooting of infant ventilators; infant CPAP devices and O2 hoods. Studies in this area include stress testing and patient education as well as rehabilitative procedures. May be taken for Honors.

    Corequisite: RESP 204A Lab and RESP 243 Clinical 4.
    Prerequisites: RESP 201A Respiratory Care 3 and RESP 241 Clinical 3.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RESP 204A - Respiratory Care 4 Lab

    2 credits

    Covers invasive and non- invasive monitoring of the critically ill patient. Invasive studies include cardiac catheterization, arterial cannulation, and related hemodynamic monitoring. Non-invasive studies include oximetry, capnography, ECG monitoring and transcutaneous gas analysis. An intubation rotation is conducted where students develop proficiency in both intubation and extubation techniques. Neonatal and pediatric critical care, as well as general care, is covered, including high-risk delivery and transport, hyaline membrane disease, BPD, PFC, and other cardio-pulmonary dysfunctions peculiar to this population. The final segment of the course covers home care and rehabilitation. Laboratory practicums include application of an ECG arrhythmia simulator to an oscilloscope for interpretation and intervention; setup and maintenance of pulmonary artery catheters; interpretation of cardiovascular pressures; end-tidal CO2 analysis; VQ determinations; intubation/extubations on manikins; treadmill stress-testing; application, maintenance, and trouble-shooting of infant ventilators; infant CPAP devices and O2 hoods. Studies in this area include stress testing and patient education as well as rehabilitative procedures. May be taken for Honors.

    Corequisite: RESP 204A Lab and RESP 243 Clinical 4.
    Prerequisites: RESP 201A Respiratory Care 3 and RESP 241 Clinical 3.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RESP 206 - Case Presentations

    1 credits

    Seminar discussion with a physician concerning patient’s care. These discussions include: disease mechanism, clinical appearance and management, as well as respiratory care implications. Cases include the major cardiopulmonary diseases to supplement those covered in the cardiopulmonary pathology class.

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of Respiratory Care III, Clinical Experience III and Cardiopulmonary Pathology.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RESP 241 - Clinical Experience 3

    2 credits

    Application of theory and practice of material covered in Respiratory Care 1, 2 & 3. Clinical education is provided by the college’s credentialed, clinical faculty. Evaluations include the cognitive, psycho-motor, and affective domains.

    Corequisite: RESP 201A Respiratory Care 3.
    Prerequisites: RESP 145 Summer Clinical Experience 1.
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • RESP 243 - Clinical Experience 4

    2 credits

    Application of theory and practice of material covered in Respiratory Care 1, 2, 3 & 4. Clinical education is provided by the college’s credentialed, clinical faculty. Evaluations include the cognitive, psycho-motor, and affective domains.

    Corequisite: RESP 203A Respiratory Care 4.
    Prerequisites: RESP 241 Clinical Experience 3.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • RESP 245 - Summer Clinical Experience 2

    2 credits

    Clinical application of theory and practice of material covered in Respiratory Care 3 & 4. Clinical education is provided by the college’s credentialed, clinical faculty. Evaluations include the cognitive, psycho-motor, and affective domains. Physician input is an integral component of this course. Includes daily sessions as well as weekly NBRC-type exams to prepare for credentialing exams.*

    Notes: * A series of NBRC exams must be successfully completed in this course in order to pass the course.

    Prerequisites: RESP 203A Respiratory Care 4 and RESP 243 Clinical 4. Offered summer semester.

Russian

  
  • RUSSN 101 - Elementary Russian 1

    4 credits

    This introductory course for students interesting in learning Russian helps to develop the four basic language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing. It introduces basic vocabulary and grammar and provides opportunities for students to enhance their understanding and appreciation for Russian culture.

    Prerequisites: No more than one year of high school Russian.
    Offered Fall and Spring semesters.

Sign Language

  
  • ASL 101 - American Sign Language 1

    3 credits

    American Sign Language 1 introduces the student to visual-gestural and conceptual skills that provide a means of communication with deaf people in the context of the deaf culture and allow them to establish a basic means of communication with non-verbal individuals. At the completion of the course, the student will be able to recognize important linguistic and cultural variations among different groups within the culture, and will be able to carry on basic informal, interactive, face-to-face conversation with a native ASL user.

    Notes: LIN or ANTHR 201: Introduction to Linguistics is a recommended pre-course for American sign Language 1.  

  
  • ASL 102 - American Sign Language 2

    3 credits

    This course will continue to develop the student’s expressive and receptive American Sign Language skills. It will present the student with additional vocabulary and conceptual skills that will advance the student’s ability to manually communicate with the deaf and non-verbal individuals. At completion of the course, the student will be able to carry on more complex informal and semi-formal, interactive conversations with native ASL users, as well as present descriptive accounts of day-to-day activities and events. This course will focus on ASL vocabulary, concepts and grammar, deaf community and culture.

    Prerequisites: ASL 101 or equivalent.
    Pre or Corequisites: Linguisitcs recommended.


Social Science

  
  • SS 101 - Introduction to Behavioral Science

    3 credits

    This course analyzes the cultural institutions of the United States; the nature of culture, its integration, and the forces which create change; social dynamism, personality formation and interaction; the family, intergroup tensions, education, and religion.

    Notes: The course utilizes the scientific method in viewing culture as learned behavior. This course is designed as a foundation or “bridge” course prior to enrollment in the range of behavioral science courses.

  
  • SS 102 - Introduction to Social Science

    3 credits

    Analysis of the political institutions of the United States; the foundations of economic theory; micro and macro economics; the political and economic aspects of the global arena and basic geographic concepts.

    Notes: This course is designed as a foundation or “bridge” course prior to enrollment in the range of social science courses and cannot be used to satisfy Social Science core requirements.

  
  • SS 110 - Liberal Arts/Social Science Internship - A

    1 credits

    Students in the Liberal Arts/Social Sciences Curriculum intern at facilities appropriate to these disciplines. Each internship consists of a paid or unpaid workplace experience. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with a faculty advisor and written assignments are required.

    Notes: Students must receive written permission of the Department/Curriculum Chair to register for this course. (1 to 3 behavioral or social science credits). Internship hours (80 hrs/semester)

    Prerequisites: Liberal Arts/Social Science major, completed 9 credits in major and a minimum of one course in the discipline area of the internship, GPA of 2.75+, and LA/SS faculty recommendation to the Department/Curriculum Chair.
  
  • SS 112 - Liberal Arts/Social Science Internship - B

    2 credits

    Students in the Liberal Arts/Social Sciences Curriculum intern at facilities appropriate to these disciplines. Each internship consists of a paid or unpaid workplace experience. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with a faculty advisor and written assignments are required.

    Notes: Students must receive written permission of the Department/Curriculum Chair to register for this course. (1 to 3 behavioral or social science credits). Internship hours (160 hrs/semester)

    Prerequisites: Liberal Arts/Social Science major, completed 9 credits in major and a minimum of one course in the discipline area of the internship, GPA of 2.75+, and LA/SS faculty recommendation to the Department/Curriculum Chair.
  
  • SS 114 - Liberal Arts/Social Science Internship - C

    3 credits

    Students in the Liberal Arts/Social Sciences Curriculum intern at facilities appropriate to these disciplines. Each internship consists of a paid or unpaid workplace experience. Students integrate classroom theory with a monitored and supervised work experience. Periodic meetings with a faculty advisor and written assignments are required.

    Notes: Students must receive written permission of the Department/Curriculum Chair to register for this course. (1 to 3 behavioral or social science credits). Internship hours (240 hrs/semester).

    Prerequisites: Liberal Arts/Social Science major, completed 9 credits in major and a minimum of one course in the discipline area of the internship, GPA of 2.75+, and LA/SS faculty recommendation to the Department/Curriculum Chair.

Sociology

  
  • SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology

    3 credits

    Basic theories and concepts relating to the study of groups in human society are studied. Emphasis is placed on the concept of culture; the reciprocal relationships of culture and the individual. It is designed to introduce interested students to the basic principles of this discipline.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
  
  • SOC 101H - Introduction to Sociology - Honors

    4 credits

    This Honors course should appeal to students who are curious about the nature of the social world and who want to participate in a challenging academic environment that sharpens their analytical skills. Students are introduced to the basic principles of sociology and the concept of culture, to important primary texts, and to the challenge of independent research on contemporary issues and problems.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research .
  
  • SOC 102 - Marriage and the Family

    3 credits

    This course provides an exploration of the interpersonal dynamics and changing institutional structures of the family. Topics covered include dating, preparation for marriage, role expectations, communication, family interaction, the future of the nuclear family and alternative family structures. The course is designed for any student with an interest in the area.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
  
  • SOC 103 - Social Problems

    3 credits

    This course provides an analysis and discussion of contemporary social problems, their historical roots and structural causes: crime, delinquency, poverty, ethnic relations, war, family, student unrest and bureaucracy. It is designed to provide students with a critical ability to look beneath current situations in order to discover their causes and roots.

    Prerequisites: SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology .
  
  • SOC 206 - Race and Ethnicity in the U.S.

    3 credits

    This course explores the many ethnic and racial groups that are part of the United States, including, but not limited to, diverse peoples categorized as Latino, Asian, African-American, Native American, white, Middle Eastern, and bi/multiracial. Issues related to assimilation, immigration, discrimination, conflict, and pluralism, both in historical and contemporary contexts, are addressed.

    Prerequisites: SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology  
 

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