May 19, 2024  
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog 
    
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Students should consult with their curriculum chair or counselor when selecting courses to satisfy program requirements. Please note: The honors versions of courses satisfy the same requirements as the non-honors versions.

 

Criminal Justice

  
  • CJ 108 - Administration of Justice

    2 credits

    This course includes an in-depth analysis of the administration of justice as it applies to the duties and responsibilities of a police officer. Included are a historical perspective on law enforcement and an overview of: the criminal justice system, responsibilities and jurisdictions of law enforcement, the court structure of the criminal justice system, fingerprinting and booking procedures, observation and patrol, police communications, and crimes-in- progress calls.

    Notes: Offered at the Police Academy and limited to sworn, full-time Police and Correctional Officers.

    Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission.
    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • CJ 110 - Police Arrest Techniques

    2 credits

    This course is centered on the mechanics of arrest; prisoner search, building search; transportation of prisoners; description and practice in the fundamental use of the police baton, methods of disarming, and protection against persons armed with deadly or dangerous weapons; demonstration and drill in a limited number of holds; “come-alongs,” handcuffing, and restraint of prisoners and the mentally ill will be provided. Sessions also include physical agility exercises designed to improve strength and endurance.

    Notes: Offered at the Police Academy and limited to sworn, full-time Police and Correctional Officers.

    Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission.
    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • CJ 111 - Introduction to Criminology

    3 credits

    An introduction to the scientific study of the causes and prevention of crime. The course examines criminal behavior and the theories of crime causation.

    Notes: Was PSCJ 111 previous to Fall 2010.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • CJ 112 - Traffic Control Function

    4 credits

    This course includes an in-depth analysis of duties and procedures as they apply to the traffic control function responsibilities of a police officer in New York State. Topics included are: police radar, traffic control and direction, traffic enforcement, impaired driving, vehicle pullovers, accident investigation, hazardous materials and EVOC (Emergency Vehicle Operation Course). A practicum is included in the areas of police radar, vehicle pullovers, accident investigation and EVOC.

    Notes: Offered at the Police Academy and limited to sworn Police and Correctional Officers.

    Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission.
    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • CJ 120 - Global Terrorism

    3 credits

    This course is designed to present an integrated approach to the concept of domestic and international terrorist tactics. The course presents the various perspectives that have given rise to the use of terrorism in modern society. Various domestic groups and international organizations are presented. Counter-terrorism tactics employed by the military as well as state and federal law enforcement are discussed.

    Notes: Was PSCJ 120 previous to Fall 2010.

  
  • CJ 130 - Comparative Criminal Justice

    3 credits

    This course will provide an in-depth examination of criminal justice systems from a global perspective. It will describe and compare the criminal justice systems of multiple model nations including their legal system, law enforcement, courts and corrections processes. The roles of religion, politics, economics, religion, and national history, will be analyzed in regard to their contribution to each nation’s justice system.

    Prerequisites: CJ 101 Intro to the Criminal Justice System in the U.S. .
  
  • CJ 202 - Juvenile Delinquency - Treatment and Control

    3 credits

    This course explores the nature and causes of juvenile delinquency and the current methods of dealing with this problem. The course examines juvenile delinquency as a historical phenomenon and analyzes the various approaches used to correct the wayward juvenile. The role of the family, the school, the community and the criminal justice system are examined.

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • CJ 206 - Drugs and the Justice System

    3 credits

    An examination of the impact of drugs on the criminal justice system. The history of drugs and alcohol prohibition will be studied within the context of traditional and non-traditional crime. The topics of the class will include the drug problem in relation to the crime rate, national criminal justice policy strategies and the infiltration of legitimate enterprises by criminal drug organizations.

    Prerequisites: CJ 101 - Intro to the Criminal Justice System in the U.S. 
  
  • CJ 221 - Criminal Justice Seminar

    3 credits

    Criminal Justice Seminar is a capstone course designed to provide an opportunity for advanced criminal justice students to apply their acquired knowledge to modern problems facing the police, courts, and corrections components of the American criminal justice system. Extensive independent research and intensive writing are required.

    Prerequisites: Students must have first completed 30 credits in the Criminal Justice curriculum, and successfully completed CJ 101 Intro to the Criminal Justice System in the U.S.  and CJ 111 Introduction to Criminology .
  
  • CJ 230 - Criminal Justice Internship 1

    3 credits

    This course consists of a pre-service fieldwork experience supervised by the faculty in close cooperation with a supervisor of a criminal justice agency. The course is individually designed to afford the student the maximum theoretical and pragmatic experience. A weekly meeting with the faculty supervisor as well as 120 hours of fieldwork are required.

    Notes: Permission of the Curriculum or Department Chairperson is required. Students must have 40 credits.

  
  • CJ 235 - Criminal Justice Internship 2

    3 credits

    This course is an extension of CJ 230 Criminal Justice Internship 1 . The course’s content is individually designed by the faculty advisor and the assigned agency’s fieldwork supervisor to fill voids in the student’s experiential background to give the student a realistic perspective of the duties, responsibilities and authority of the supervising agency prior to entering the law enforcement field. 120 hours of supervisory field work and a weekly meeting with the faculty advisor is required to integrate the fieldwork experience with the student’s academic experience.

    Notes: Permission of Curriculum or Department Chairperson is required.

  
  • COR 103B - Introduction to Corrections

    3 credits

    This course is a survey of the theories and practices of penology in correctional and reformatory institutions. The physical, educational, and social aspects of incarceration are studied with respect to their impact on the rehabilitative prospects of inmates. The concepts of probation and parole as alternatives to imprisonment are also examined.

    Notes: Was PSCOR 103B previous to Fall 2010.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • COR 111 - Institutional Treatment of the Criminal and Delinquent

    3 credits

    The history, purpose, make-up, and programs of reformatories and prisons are studied. New concepts of institutional treatment, methods of discipline procedure, present-day institutions, study of the criminal and criminal personality; orientation of the inmate are also presented for analysis and examination.

    Notes: Was PSCOR 111 previous to Fall 2010.

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • COR 121 - Probation and Parole

    3 credits

    This course provides an examination of probation and parole as alternatives to incarceration within the criminal justice system. Particular consideration is devoted to the rationale, evolution, and functioning of community-based corrections.

    Notes: Was PSCOR 121 previous to Fall 2010.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • COR 125 - Critical Issues in Corrections

    3 credits

    Critical issues in the field of corrections are examined in this course. Topics include violence, correctional staff, overcrowding, legal issues, treatment methods, special inmates, AIDS, juvenile offenders, and institutional life.

    Notes: Was PSCOR 125 previous to Fall 2010.

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • POL 111 - Introduction to Substantive Criminal Law

    3 credits

    Consideration of law as a function of our culture with particular emphasis on the origin and history of law, codes, common and statutory law, and the establishment of a government under law is examined. Definitions of crimes and classifications of offenses are considered, along with the basic principles and concepts of law. Case studies of crimes in selected categories are considered for analysis.

    Notes: Was PSPOL 111 previous to Fall 2010.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • POL 120 - Police Organization and Management

    3 credits

    This course examines the relationship of management functions (i.e., planning, organizing, staffing, direction, and controlling) to the organization and administration of an effective police agency. Students are involved in analysis of management functions as they relate to the criminal justice system. Classical and contemporary organizational models, as well as typical administrative procedures, control processes, and resource utilization are studied. Specific topics include administrative procedures, legal authority, labor relations, motivational challenges, communication systems, and management strategies.

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • POL 201 - Police-Community Relations

    3 credits

    The study of the complex and sensitive issues involved in the relationship between the police and the community they serve. Various attitudes and beliefs which affect police-community relations are examined. Methods and programs designed to improve that relationship are explored and evaluated.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • POL 203 - Principles of Investigation

    3 credits

    An introduction to the field of criminal investigation which includes the history of the evolution of scientific investigation, the development of legal proscriptions, and the methodologies of detection, identification, and apprehension of criminal offenders.

    Notes: Was PSPOL 203 previous to Fall 2010.

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • POL 205 - Survey of Organized Crime

    3 credits

    A survey course examining organized crime and its role in contemporary American society. Attention is focused on the origins, organization, membership, and functions of the criminal cartel. The control of organized crime within the criminal justice system is also investigated.

    Offered spring semester.
  
  • POL 210 - Supervision and Management of Police

    5 credits

    This course examines a number of issues relating to the supervision and management of police within the context of a multicultural/multi-ethnic society. The issues studied include the basic supervisory responsibilities of a supervisor in law enforcement, the concepts and inter-relationships of basic organizational structures, leadership styles, terms and concepts associated with police supervision, supervisor influence on employee performance, barriers to effective communication, employee counseling, and interview in a police setting.

    Offered twice a year at the Police Academy to full-time police officers only.
  
  • POL 211 - Basic Criminal Law and Procedure

    3 credits

    An examination of the principles of American criminal procedure. This course includes an in-depth analysis of procedural due process as applied to police work, including the areas of arrest, search and seizure, interrogation, and the decisions that have to be made while dealing with constitutional guarantees provided to persons accused of crime.

    Notes: Was PSPOL 211 previous to Fall 2010.

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • POL 212 - Police Supervision

    3 credits

    This course examines the fundamentals of supervision as applied to police operations, including techniques to provide effective leadership, discipline, training, and communications within the supervisor’s area of responsibility.

    Notes: Was PSPOL 212 previous to Fall 2010.

    Prerequisites: POL 120 Police Organization and Management .
    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • POL 213 - Police Instructor Development

    3 credits

    This course is an intensive program to prepare an active police/peace officer for instructional duties. This course includes development of the necessary skills and instructional methods for the successful police trainer. The student is required to prepare and present instructional material to the class.

    Notes: Offered at the Police Academy (to full-time police officers).


Dance

Dance courses can also be taken to fulfill a combination of Humanities and Physical Education: Health and Fitness (PEH) credit requirements. To receive PEH credits for a dance course, look for the course under the PEH prefix and use that course number when you register.

  
  • DANCE 101 - Elementary Modern Dance 1

    3 credits

    Designed to develop students’ awareness of the basic concepts and vocabulary of modern dance as a basis for the appreciation of modern dance, for aesthetic satisfaction, for physical well-being, and for performance. During the course, students learn basic locomotive and non-locomotive steps and combinations. They also become familiar with the philosophical and artistic contributions of the forerunners and pioneers of modern dance. There are some written, reading, and dance assignments. Students learn and perform a short modern dance with other members of the class.

    Offered fall and spring semesters, day and evening sections.
  
  • DANCE 102 - Elementary Modern Dance 2

    3 credits

    A continuation of DANCE 101 Elementary Modern Dance 1 . Basic concepts and movement vocabulary are reviewed, and students then continue to strengthen technique and aesthetic awareness by introduction of new and more demanding movement patterns, improvisations, and movement assignments paced and geared to the Elementary 2 level. There are some writing, reading, and dance assignments. Elementary 2 students study the philosophical and artistic combinations of the second generation and the avant-garde.

    Prerequisites: DANCE 101 Elementary Modern Dance 1  or the equivalent or permission of the instructor.
    Offered fall and spring semesters, evenings only.
  
  • DANCE 105 - Movement Improvisation

    1 credits

    Movement improvisation is a class that expands the student’s’ movement vocabulary and understanding of physical language through a variety of problem-solving exercises. These exercises encourage students to discover new ways of thinking about time, space, dynamics, text, and sound. By solving the exploration problems, the student spontaneously discovers new approaches to the creative process. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort, progress, assignments, and exams.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • DANCE 107 - Elementary Ballet

    3 credits

    Movement experiences presenting the fundamentals of classical ballet in order to develop understanding of and skills in the basic ballet vocabulary. Includes an overview of ballet history and a written and/or dance assignment. Students learn and perform a short ballet dance with other members of the class.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • DANCE 112 - Latin Dance 1

    1 credits

    Merengue and Salsa steps are used to teach the fundamentals of movement and social dancing principals. The primary focus is mastery of basic steps and partnering. The social and historical context of these forms is also covered. All students participate in an end-of-semester performance utilizing material covered. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort and progress assessed through written and reading assignments, written and practical quizzes, classroom participation and the final performance.

    Notes: Formerly: Intro to Merengue and Salsa. Take for 1 Humanities or 1 PEH credit.

    Offered spring semester
  
  • DANCE 115 - Hip Hop 1

    1 credits

    The course covers the fundamentals of dance technique focusing on various styles of Hop Hop. Students learn proper body placement, coordination, and timing as well as explore their individuality and personal style. The social and historical context of the form is also explored. All students participate in an end-of-semester performance utilizing material covered. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort and progress assessed through written and reading assignments, written and practical quizzes, classroom participation and the final performance.

  
  • DANCE 120 - Broadway Jazz

    1 credits

    This course provides a dance experience designed to develop the student’s awareness of the basic principles of classic jazz dance. The class will learn and perform a simple jazz dance. The course includes video and live performance viewings, short reading and written assignments that put the student’s physical experiences into historical and social context. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort, progress, assignments, and exams.

    Offered spring and fall semesters and Summer Session I.
  
  • DANCE 121 - Contemporary Jazz

    3 credits

    The course is designed to teach basic principles and beginning skills of the jazz idiom. It also introduces students to the contemporary nuances and current trends in the dance discipline. The course includes short written assignments and video viewings. The class will learn and perform a simple contemporary jazz dance. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort, progress, assignments, and exams.

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • DANCE 122 - Latin Dance 2

    1 credits

    This advanced-beginner level course builds on DANCE 112 Latin Dance 1 . The fundamental steps of Salsa and Merengue are assembled in more complex combinations. Bachata and Rumba are also introduced. The social and historical context of these forms is also covered. All students participate in an end-of-semester performance utilizing material covered. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort and progress assessed through written and reading assignments, written and practical quizzes, classroom participation and the final performance.

    Notes: Take for 1 humanities or 1 PEH credit.

    Prerequisites: DANCE 112 Latin Dance 1 /PEH 123 Latin Dance 1  (fomerly Intro to Merenge and Salsa).
  
  • DANCE 131 - Jazz Dance Workshop

    1 credits

    A continuation of Elementary Jazz Dance I. Basic principles of movement and jazz techniques and steps are reviewed. Students then continue to strengthen their techniques and aesthetic awareness by introduction of many new and more demanding combinations and movement assignments geared to an advanced beginning level. There are some written, reading, and dance assignments. The class learns and performs a jazz dance.

    Prerequisites: DANCE 121 Contemporary Jazz  or previous formal training in dance, modern jazz or ballet.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • DANCE 205 - Choreography and Dance Performance Combined

    3 credits

    Students will learn basic choreographic skills to create solo and group choreography. They will use auto-ethnographic research methods to gather qualitative data as source material for their autobiographical choreography assignments. Grading is based on several choreographic projects, short writing assignments, brief oral presentation, final project and written final exam.

    Prerequisites: Students must have previous technical training in dance.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • DANCE 207 - Independent Study in Dance Performance

    3 credits

    Students rehearse and perform a minimum of two dances as part of DanceWorks, the college dance company, and attend company classes. Involves a yearlong commitment to rehearsals, Saturday classes, and all performances. Open by audition, permission of the company director and dance faculty consultant, as well as enrollment in or successful completion of Westchester Community College dance courses at appropriate level.

    Notes: Registration may be in fall or spring, but work must span both semesters.

  
  • DANCE 208 - Dance Internship

    3 credits

    Students will engage in supervised work at a performing arts organization to develop skills essential to the dance genre in areas of production, administration, casting, rehearsals, costuming, and design.

    Prerequisites: Sudent must have completed 9 of 18 Performing Arts elective courses.  Instructor approval required.

E.M.T. - Paramedic

  
  • EMS 100 - EMS First Responder

    3 credits

    This course introduces students to the basics of prehospital emergency care. Students will learn the skills necessary to begin assessing and caring for patients at the scene of injury or illness. The course will follow the NYS Department of Health, Bureau of EMS guidelines for certification as a Certified First Responder. Students successfully completing this course will be eligible for the NYS Practical Skills exam and NYS written certification exam for Certified First Responder.

    Notes: Was EMS 102 previous to Fall 2010.

  
  • EMS 101 - Emergency Medical Services 1

    5 credits

    This course introduces the student to EMS systems, basic human topographical anatomy, basic life support (CPR) as well as assessment and various treatment modalities for medical and traumatic emergencies. Also required are 16 hours of pre-hospital field experience. Upon successful completion of all course work, and practical skills examination, students are eligible to take the New York State Department of Health certification exam for EMT-B.

    Prerequisites: A student enrolled in EMS must be 17 years of age by the last day of the month in which he/she is scheduled to take the written certification exam.
  
  • EMS 110 - Disaster Preparedness

    3 credits

    This course exposes the student to the principles of disaster preparation and coordination. A presentation of the problems facing EMS personnel are explored through an interdisciplinary approach to the various aspects of disaster response and management. The student gains a better understanding of an EMS disaster as an EMS specialist. In addition, the importance that society places on disasters, whether peacetime, natural, or technological are explored. A global comparison identifies the impact of disasters on different cultures, styles of governments, and the different approaches to disaster management.

    Prerequisites: EMS 101 Emergency Medical Services 1 .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • EMS 115 - Human Body Systems

    3 credits

    This introductory course is for particular health science students requiring a one-semester review of the anatomy and physiology of human systems, the pathophysiology of major human systems and life span development. This course does not include a lab.

  
  • EMS 121 - Paramedic 1, Lab and Clinical Studies

    4 credits


    This course covers an introduction to paramedic care, patient assessment and advanced airway management.

    Notes: Enrollment in EMS courses requires admission into an EMT program at the college.

    To students enrolled in a 7-week course or courses: In addition to meeting standard financial aid requirements, in order to be eligible for financial aid, students must also be enrolled in at least one 15-week course in the same semester.

    Corequisite: EMS 122 Paramedic 2, Lab and Clinical Studies .
    Prerequisites: BIOL 121 Anatomy and Physiology 1 (and Lab)  and BIOL 123 Anatomy and Physiology 2 (and Lab) .
    Offered fall semester.

  
  • EMS 122 - Paramedic 2, Lab and Clinical Studies

    5 credits


    This course covers the prehospital assessment and treatment of airway and respiratory emergencies as well as trauma and shock. 

    Notes: Enrollment in EMS courses requires admission into an EMT program at the college.

    To students enrolled in a 7-week course or courses: In addition to meeting standard financial aid requirements, in order to be eligible for financial aid, students must also be enrolled in at least one 15-week course in the same semester.

    Corequisite: EMS 121 Paramedic 1, Lab and Clinical Studies .
    Prerequisites:  BIOL 121 Anatomy and Physiology 1 (and Lab)  and BIOL 123 Anatomy and Physiology 2 (and Lab) .
    Offered fall semester.

  
  • EMS 130 - Pre-Hospital Pharmacology

    3 credits

    This course introduces the EMS professional to basic pharmacology including pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, with an emphasis on the pre-hospital setting. The course presents a variety of medications according to their therapeutic application. Pertinent physiology and related diseases are also presented along with appropriate medications. Pharmacology is approached by body system (nervous system, respiratory system, cardiac system, etc.) so that the therapeutic action of drugs may be clearly understood.

    Corequisite: EMS 121 Paramedic 1, Lab and Clinical Studies  and EMS 122 Paramedic 2, Lab and Clinical Studies .
  
  • EMS 135 - Introduction to EMS Research

    3 credits

    This class helps students understand the importance of EMS research in today’s EMS Systems. Students learn the research process, as well as how to design a study, ethical considerations, and how to implement a research project and collect data. This course is designed for the EMS professional, whether a field provider, educator, or administrator. Research has always been essential in scientific documentation. Students learn a true appreciation of the importance of the EMS research process?from design through implementation.

    Prerequisites: EMS Certification (EMT-Basic or EMT Paramedic)
  
  • EMS 210 - Comparative EMS Systems

    4 credits

    This course examines various components of an EMS system by comparing existing systems nationwide. Each system is examined for its strengths and weaknesses in comparison with local systems. Students are encouraged to identify problems in their local systems and formulate solutions to current and anticipated shortcomings. Upon completion, students have a thorough understanding of an effective EMS system and their role in it.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • EMS 215 - EMS Administration and Leadership

    3 credits

    This course introduces the EMS professional to issues in prehospital care administration. Students explore issues in culture and human resources, EMS operations, financial issues as well as the changing clinical environment and EMS system design. EMS students gain insights into the field of EMS through discussion, readings and case studies.

    Prerequisites: EMS 101 Emergency Medical Services 1  or permission from department chair.
  
  • EMS 217 - Legal Aspects of EMS

    3 credits

    This course introduces the EMS professional to the legal aspects of Emergency Medical Services. Students explore issues in malpractice, consent and refusal of treatment, OSHA, employment issues, and risk management. EMS students gain insights into the legal liabilities in Emergency Medical Services through discussion, readings, and case studies.

    Prerequisites: EMS 101 Emergency Medical Services 1  or permission from department chair.
  
  • EMS 221 - Paramedic 3

    10 credits

    This course covers the prehospital assessment and treatment of cardiovascular emergencies as well as Emergency Medical Services operations.

    Notes: Malpractice insurance is required for this course as well as for EMS 222  and EMS 231 . This fee is automatically charged to all students enrolled in EMS 221 and is valid for 1 year.  Students that require more than 1 year to complete these courses, have to purchase it again.

    Corequisite: EMS 222 Paramedic 4 .
    Prerequisites: EMS 121 Paramedic 1, Lab and Clinical Studies  and EMS 122 Paramedic 2, Lab and Clinical Studies .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  
  • EMS 231 - Paramedic 5

    8 credits

    This capstone course prepares students to function as a competent entry-level paramedic utilizing a combination of medical simulation scenarios and a field internship.

    Notes: Malpractice insurance is required for this course as well as for EMS 221  and EMS 222 . This fee is automatically charged to all students enrolled in EMS 221 and is valid for 1 year.  Students that require more than 1 year to complete these courses, have to purchase it again.

    Prerequisites: EMS 222 - Paramedic 4 . Students must also be admitted to the Paramedic Certificate or A.A.S. program prior to enrollment in this class.

Early Childhood

  
  • ECE 170 - Early Childhood Development

    3 credits

    This course explores the process of change from birth through the pre-school years, emphasizing the interaction between social, emotional, cognitive, and physical development. Major development theories and the ways that they inform childrearing and educational practices are critically examined. Focus is placed on how history, culture, class, and gender identification, influence the young child. Themes include the child as a maker of meaning, nature versus nurture, and temperament. Students use a variety of research methods in completing course assignments.

  
  • ECE 171 - Foundations of Early Childhood

    3 credits

    This course examines the historical, philosophical, and cultural roots of the Early Childhood Education movement and their influences on contemporary practices. The course is designed to help students develop a set of beliefs that will enable them to create environments that nurture investigation and foster a sense of community. Consideration is given to the important role of families in education and the teacher parent relationship. Emphasis is placed on responding to the call for culturally and ethnically sensitive teaching practices within the full range of human differences.

  
  • ECE 270 - Observation and Assessment

    4 credits

    Observing children is at the core of Early Childhood Education. Through documentation of teacher’s observations and the works of the child using the Prospect Center Descriptive Review of the Child and the Description of Children’s Work, the student comes to understand how a particular child makes meaning. Through shared recollections of their own learning experiences students gain a larger perspective of teaching and learning. Emphasis is placed on collaboration and sharing observations in developing knowledge about teaching.

    Corequisite: ECE 271 - Early Childhood Field 1 .
    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
    Pre or Corequisites: Pre- or Corequisite:  ECE 170 - Early Childhood Development  and ECE 171 - Foundations of Early Childhood .

  
  • ECE 271 - Early Childhood Field 1

    3 credits


    This weekly 9-hour field experience accompanies the course: Observation & Assessment in Early Childhood. The student learns how Early Childhood Practitioners become researchers by systematic observation of children’s behaviors and works in a group setting. Students practice techniques of recording and assessment of a child’s development which culminates in a portfolio and descriptive review of a child.

    Notes: Early Childhood A.A.S. and Certificate students may take only one field related course per semester.

     

    For Fall 2021, field classes will be held remotely and in conjunction with placements in schools and childcare centers.

    Corequisite: ECE 270 - Observation and Assessment .
    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
    Pre or Corequisites: Pre- or Corequisite:  ECE 170 - Early Childhood Development  and ECE 171 - Foundations of Early Childhood .

  
  • ECE 272 - Infant/Toddler Environments

    3 credits

    This course emphasizes research about infant/toddler development as a framework for group care that supports the young child’s needs for safe exploration, responsive routines, continuity with family and culture, and experiences that guide them in making sense of their world.

    Corequisite: ECE 273 Early Childhood Field 2 .
    Prerequisites: ECE 270 - Observation and Assessment .
  
  • ECE 273 - Early Childhood Field 2

    3 credits


    The Field Experience accompanies the Infant/Toddler Environments course and requires 9 hours a week in an infant/toddler setting. The student learns the ways in which his/her early childhood program meets the physical, intellectual and social needs of the children as well as their parents. Students have an opportunity to practice, under professional supervision, the methods studied in the linked courses.

    Notes: Early Childhood A.A.S. and Certificate students may take only one field related course per semester.

    For Fall 2021, field classes will be held remotely and in conjunction with placements in schools and childcare centers.

    Corequisite: ECE 272 Infant/Toddler Environments .
    Prerequisites: ECE 271 - Early Childhood Field 1 .

  
  • ECE 274 - Early Childhood Curriculum

    3 credits

    This course is designed to prepare students for planning and implementing culturally and developmentally relevant curriculum for children N-2nd grade. Emphasis is placed on the emergent curriculum, project work and documentation. Student teachers explore how children represent their understanding through language, dramatic play, art, blocks, sand and water and manipulatives. Most sessions are workshops that provide students with opportunities to explore materials first hand.

    Corequisite: ECE 275 Early Childhood Field 3 .
    Prerequisites: ECE 270 - Observation and Assessment .
  
  • ECE 275 - Early Childhood Field 3

    3 credits


    The Early Childhood Field course 3 is taken with Early Childhood Curriculum. Students have an opportunity to explore and translate theories of curriculum development into classroom practice. Students are required to spend 9 hours a week in an Early Childhood classroom.

    Notes: Early Childhood A.A.S. and Certificate students may take only one field related course per semester.

    For Fall 2021, field classes will be held remotely and in conjunction with placements in schools and childcare centers.

    Corequisite: ECE 274 Early Childhood Curriculum .
    Prerequisites: ECE 271 - Early Childhood Field 1 .

  

Economics

  
  • ECON 101 - Macroeconomics

    3 credits

    This course is designed to introduce students to both the basic principles used in economic theory and to the institutional details of the organization of economic systems in the United States and other countries. In addition, the course helps students understand the ways in which different economies are linked and the effects of economic interactions within and between countries. The contents of the course include demand and supply analysis, national income accounting, economic growth, monetary and fiscal policies, as well as, global economic issues such as international trade and capital flows. Various contemporary policy issues are also analyzed.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  and Math Level 1-Ready  
  
  • ECON 101H - Macroeconomics-Honors

    3 credits

    This course is designed to introduce students to both the basic principles used in economic theory and to the institutional details of the organization of economic systems in the United States and other countries. In addition, the course helps students understand the ways in which different economies are linked and the effects of economic interactions within and between countries. The contents of the course include demand and supply analysis, national income accounting, economic growth, monetary and fiscal policies, as well as global economic issues such as international trade and capital flows. Various contemporary policy issues are also analyzed. The course develops a conceptual framework to help students independently analyze economic policy issues.

    Prerequisites: College-level Algebra and ENG 101 - Writing and Research .
  
  • ECON 102 - Microeconomics

    3 credits

    This course provides an analysis of the basic market forces of demand and supply, and economic outcomes under different market structures such as competitive, imperfectly competitive and monopolistic markets. The labor and capital markets are also analyzed. In addition, the economics of the public sector emphasizes tax policy, externalities, monopoly power and the provision of public goods. The course examines contemporary social issues such as income distribution, poverty and the welfare system as well as global issues such as international trade and protectionism.

    Prerequisites: Math Level 1-Ready  
    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • ECON 102H - Microeconomics-Honors

    3 credits

    This course provides an analysis of the basic market forces of demand and supply, and economic outcomes under different market structures such as competitive, imperfectly competitive and monopolistic markets. The labor and capital markets are also analyzed. In addition, the economics of the public sector emphasizes tax policy, externalities, monopoly power and the provision of public goods. The course examines contemporary social issues such as income distribution, poverty and the welfare system as well as global issues such as international trade and protectionism. This course is meant for the student who is already familiar with economic analysis and develops a conceptual framework to help students independently analyze economic policy issues.

    Prerequisites: ECON 101 Macroeconomics , College-level Algebra, and ENG 101 - Writing and Research .
  
  • ECON 215 - International Economics

    3 credits

    This course is designed to introduce students to both the basic principles of international trade theory and various international policy issues. The content of the course includes an analysis of international trade policy, foreign exchange rates, balance of payments, open-economy macroeconomics, and international macroeconomic policy. Throughout the course there is an emphasis on comparing economic outcomes with and without international trade. International institutions such as the World Trade Organization, the European Union and regional trade pacts such as NAFTA are studied. The course is meant for the student who is already familiar with economic analysis.

    Prerequisites: ECON 101 Macroeconomics .
  
  • SS 105 - Personal Finance

    3 credits

    Personal Finance provides a solid presentation of the concepts and principles necessary to successfully manage finances and avoid common pitfalls. Topics include: budgeting, time value of money, tax strategies, consumer credit, identity theft, savings and brokerage accounts, insurance, home buying and selling, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, retirement planning and estate planning. This is a practical course designed to familiarize the student with personal financial issues.

    Notes: For elective credit only. This course cannot be used to satisfy Behavioral Science core requirements.


Education

  
  • EDU 101 - Foundations of Elementary Education

    3 credits

    This course examines the historical, philosophical, social and cultural influences on education in the United States. Students will consider the role of the teacher in today’s classrooms and focus on curriculum planning as well as partnering with children and families. Students will begin to develop a personal philosophy of education as well as a set of values for teaching and working with families. Students will visit an elementary classroom.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
  
  • EDU 103 - Teaching in Today’s Diverse Classroom

    3 credits

    This course explores the social context of today’s schools, responding to the diverse cultural and multicultural landscape as well as the complexities of children’s lives in today’s society. Students will consider how to differentiate instruction as well as work closely with the diverse families in today’s schools.

    Pre or Corequisites: EDU 101 - Foundations of Elementary Education  or permission of Curriculum Chair

    every fall and spring
  
  • EDU 200 - Special Education: Contemporary Perspectives

    3 credits

    This course provides an overview of working with children with a range of disabilities and differences. Topics include the historical, philosophical, and legal foundations of special education. Students will explore teaching strategies, modifications, and accommodations. Current issues in education will be explored.

    Pre or Corequisites: EDU 101 - Foundations of Elementary Education  or permission of Curriculum Chair

    every fall and spring
  
  • EDU 202 - Elementary Education Practicum and Field Study

    3 credits

    This course offers students an experience in elementary teaching. Students participate in a practicum seminar and in an applied learning experience in a local elementary school. In class, students will consider the relationships and interactions between and among students, families, teachers and administrators. Students will work to connect educational theory to practice, drawing from their field placements.

    Notes: The applied learning component is currently offered remotely in collaboration with the Ossining School District.

    Prerequisites: EDU 101 - Foundations of Elementary Education  
    Pre or Corequisites: EDU 200 - Special Education: Contemporary Perspectives  and a cummulative grade point average of 2.5 or better.

    every fall and spring

Electrical Technology

  
  • ELEC 128 - Electrical Circuits

    3 credits

    An introduction to electric circuit fundamentals, including Ohm’s Law and Kirchoff’s Law. Students analyze serial, parallel and combinations of circuits using circuits theorems, Thevinin, Norton and superposition. Introduction to AC circuits is included using simulation and hands-on laboratories.

    Prerequisites: MATH 93 Beginning Algebra   or  MATH 135 - College Algebra with Trigonometry  or higher (except  MATH 140 - Statistics ); or Math placement code 41.01.
  
  • ELEC 129 - Digital Logic

    3 credits

    Binary number systems and codes, fundamentals of Boolean Algebra, algebra simplifications; BCD, ASCII and parity codes. Basic gates and OR, invert, NAND, NOR and XOR, XNOR Comparators; flip flops: Sequential circuits; parallel adders; Counter Design; registers, decoders, encoders, Multiplexers and Demultiplexers. Emphasis on Integrated circuits.

    Prerequisites: High School Algebra or MATH 93 Beginning Algebra .
  
  • ELEC 134 - Power Circuit Analysis

    3 credits

    This course provides the electrical power student the capability to work with power circuits using electrical analysis methods and simulation and analysis tools. Topics include phasor analysis, three-phase circuits, real, reactive, and apparent power analysis, symmetrical components, and transformer action. An introduction to electronic devices as applied to power circuits is included. Emphasis is on SCR and TRIAC devices on three-phase circuits and applications.

  
  • ELEC 137 - Alternating Current and Non-Sine Waves

    3 credits

    Alternating current circuits and different waveforms are analyzed: Sine/usoidal, exponential, rectangular, square, triangular and mixed waveforms. Average and effective values are calculated. Complex number algebra is used. Impedance, reactance, conductance, admittance and reactance concepts are studied. The laws of circuit analysis are applied to AC excitation. RL, RC, RLC circuits are studied; simulation and hands-on laboratories to illustrate theory.

    Corequisite: MATH 135 College Algebra with Trigonometry .
    Prerequisites: ELEC 128 Electrical Circuits .
  
  • ELEC 160 - Electronics

    3 credits

    Provides a basic knowledge of electronics using semi-conductor devices. A wide range of practical applications is studied. Experiments use discrete and integrated circuits. Basic circuit configuration using diodes, transistors, optical devices and operational amplifiers are studied. The course discusses trouble shooting techniques that are applicable to electronic circuits.

    Prerequisites: High School Algebra or MATH 93 Beginning Algebra .
  
  • ELEC 204 - Electrical Machinery

    3 credits

    Electromagnetic induction; characteristics and analysis of DC generators and motors, shunt series, and compound efficiency i voltage regulation; torque; speed regulation starting a DC motor; standards and rating; polyphase system; characteristics and analysis of the alternator; synchronous impedance, power factor, correction, and applications. Different motor designs are presented.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 128 Electrical Circuits .
  
  • ELEC 207 - Instrumentation and Control Systems

    3 credits

    This is a course on electronic measurement and control techniques that are PC and processor based. An introduction to various sensors is given with associated electronic interfacing. Data acquisition methods are studied with PC monitoring and control software used. An introduction to programmable logic controllers is given with ladder logic programming. Control systems are studied and applications given to utility systems and supporting subsystems.

  
  • ELEC 211 - Photovoltaic System Design

    3 credits

    This course covers the theory and design of (primarily residential) photovoltaic systems. The operations of subsystem components are explained, including PV modules, charge controllers and inverters, and battery systems. Methods of electrical interconnection, disconnects, over-current protection and grounding following NEC codes are outlined. Solar radiation, system sizing, and mechanical integration topics are included. The course provides hands-on installation training using industry equipment.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 128 Electrical Circuits .
  
  • ELEC 218 - Introduction to Microprocessors

    3 credits

    This course introduces microprocessor architectures and microcomputer systems including memory type and organization. Topics include: buses architecture, serial/parallel I/O systems, memory systems, instruction set, timing operation, programming, and applications. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze programs and trouble-shoot basic microprocessor circuits.

  
  • ELEC 223 - Digital Logic and Switching Circuits

    4 credits

    This is a transfer-oriented comprehensive course. A review of basic digital chips is performed. A review of computer arithmetic is performed. Boolean Laws are emphasized and studied. Combinational circuits are analyzed from given logical diagram; combinational circuits synthesized (built) from given logic algebraic equation. Sequential circuits analyzed with memory devices studied. Adders, counters, registers, etc. are analyzed. Encoders and decoders, multiplexing and generation of digital waveforms are studied. Solid state switching circuits are investigated. Simulated and hands-on experimentation performed.

  
  • ELEC 228 - Energy Conversion & Power

    3 credits

    Provides a basic knowledge of electrical distribution system principle and construction of a transformer. Losses, efficiency and transformer rating. Study method of control, electro-mechanical control, solid state control and microprocessor control. Basic concept of programmable controller and applications.

    Not offered every semester.
  
  • ELEC 239 - Analog Circuits

    3 credits

    Covers several integrated circuit operations, including operational amplifiers, voltage regulators, phototransistors and selected IC devices. The course includes summing amplifiers, Opamp applications. The course includes trouble shooting, analog circuits, analog-digital and digital-analog conversions.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 160 Electronics .
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • ELEC 240 - Advanced Electronics

    3 credits

    Review of diodes and transistors. Diode clipping and clamping. Small signal amplifiers using math models. Cascaded amplifiers, large signal analysis, class A, B amplifiers, FET amplifiers. Study of high, low and band pass filters. Laboratory experimentations.

  
  • ELEC 255 - Circuits for Engineers

    3 credits

    Circuits involving: Ohm’s Law, Kirchoff’s laws, voltage and current divider rules, superposition, Thevenin’s theorem, mesh and nodal analysis. Circuits involving resistance, capacitance and inductance, phasors.

  
  • ELEC 271 - Special Project/Independent Study - A

    1 credits

    Special projects, independent study or technical paper in electrical technology. Supervised, evaluated, and adapted to the needs and interests of the especially qualified electrical technology student. Content and evaluation determined by the faculty sponsor, chairperson, and members of the Electrical Technology Department.

  
  • ELEC 272 - Special Project/Independent Study - B

    2 credits

    Special projects, independent study or technical paper in electrical technology. Supervised, evaluated, and adapted to the needs and interests of the especially qualified electrical technology student. Content and evaluation determined by the faculty sponsor, chairperson, and members of the Electrical Technology Department.

  
  • ELEC 273 - Special Project/Independent Study - C

    3 credits

    Special projects, independent study or technical paper in electrical technology. Supervised, evaluated, and adapted to the needs and interests of the especially qualified electrical technology student. Content and evaluation determined by the faculty sponsor, chairperson, and members of the Electrical Technology Department.

  
  • ELEC 282 - Electronic Communication

    3 credits

    This course covers the basics for and understanding of communications systems and circuits. Circuit components include filters, amplifiers, oscillators, mixers, phase locked loops and analog/digital converters. Various analog and digital modulation and multiplexing techniques are presented with emphasis on current technologies. System comparisons using information capacity relations , signal quality, as well as modulation and multiplexing methods are studied using time and frequency domain concepts. Wired and wireless data networks are studied (including LAN and WAN networks using the OSI model functionality) and explored using current networking devices.

    Prerequisites: ELEC 128 Electrical Circuits .
  
  • ELEC 285 - Emerging Digital Technology

    3 credits

    This course covers topics currently of interest in emerging digital technology. Examples include robot controls and circuitry that augments microcomputer control, and includes sensors and connections to microcomputers.


English

  
  • ENG 91 - Writing for College 1

    0 credits

    This course is designed to address the needs of students who require intensive review of essential writing skills, including sentence skills, paragraph structure, paragraph linkage, syntax, and grammar. Students will improve their writing proficiency and gain skills necessary for success in ENG 101 - Writing and Research.  Students are encouraged to seek additional support in the Writing Tutorial.

    Prerequisites: Appropriate course placement.
  
  • ENG 92 - Writing for College 2

    0 credits


    Students are assigned to Writing for College 2 based on the results of their writing placement entrance exam or a passing grade in ENG 91 - Writing for College 1  . This course is designed to address the needs of students who require intensive review of grammar and syntax. By completing exercises and assignments that teach sentence skills, paragraph structure, paragraph linkage, and test-taking skills, students will improve their writing proficiency and gain skills necessary for success in ENG 101 - Writing and Research . Students are encouraged to gain additional support in the Writing Tutorial and the Academic Support Center. A writing competency exam will be administered during the semester.

     

    Prerequisites: Successful completion of prerequisite course ENG 91 - Writing for College 1  or appropriate course placement.

  
  • ENG 99 - Writing Studio

    0 credits

    This is a 0-credit course that supports a linked section of ENG 101 , offering students additional instruction, peer interaction and time-on-task in an active, workshop-based environment. Additional instruction, activities, and assessments support (rather than supplement) students’ work in ENG 101 and include: instructor and peer conferencing, draft workshops, contextual grammar and style instruction, and discussions of how to succeed in ENG 101 and college in general.

    Notes: Enrollment in this course is based on the results of a student’s placement test scores. This is a Pass/Fail course.

    Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  
    Prerequisites: Successful completion of prerequisite course ENG 91 - Writing for College 1  or appropriate course placement.
  
  • ENG 101 - Writing and Research

    3 credits

    Students in this class conduct research and write proposals, annotated bibliographies or literature reviews, and research essays. They develop research topics and questions; identify, summarize, analyze, evaluate, and synthesize relevant sources; and present arguments based on their findings. Students document where information and ideas come from by using MLA style. They enter academic conversations by doing research that builds upon existing knowledge.

    Prerequisites: English 101-Ready  
  
  • ENG 101H - Writing and Research - Honors

    3 credits

    An enhanced Honors version of ENG 101 . Students conduct research and write proposals, annotated bibliographies or literature reviews, and research essays.  They develop research topics and questions; identify, summarize, analyze, evaluate, and synthesize relevant sources; and present arguments based on their findings. Students document where information and ideas come from using MLA style. They enter academic conversations by doing research that builds upon existing knowledge. 

    Prerequisites: Placement essay score of 9 and Honors permission.
    every fall and spring
  
  • ENG 102 - Writing and Literature

    3 credits

    The second semester of a two-semester English sequence. Students are introduced to literary terminology and methodology. They demonstrate in writing and discussion the ability to understand, analyze, and interpret works representing (but not limited to) the genres of drama, fiction, and poetry. Students enter broader conversations about literature by conducting research, evaluating sources, and documenting where information and ideas come from using MLA style. 

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  or equivalent at another college.
  
  • ENG 102H - Writing and Literature - Honors

    3 credits

    An enhanced Honors version of ENG 102 . Students are introduced to literary terminology and methodology. They demonstrate in writing and discussion the ability to understand, analyze, and interpret works representing (but not limited to) the genres of drama, fiction and poetry. Students enter broader conversations about literature by conducting research, evaluating sources, and documenting where information and ideas come from using MLA style.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  (or equivalent from another college) and department concent.
    every fall and spring
  
  • ENG 113 - Reading and Writing Poetry

    3 credits

    A writing workshop which includes extensive reading in the traditions and current practices of poetry. Self-directed projects. Emphasis on growth of critical and poetic expression.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  or permission of instructor.
  
  • ENG 115 - Creative Writing

    3 credits

    Students will gain an introduction to genres of creative writing, including fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will read, analyze, and write creatively in each genre, producing a final portfolio of creative and critical work demonstrating an understanding of both practice and process. Instruction will include workshops, exercises in craft, and student readings.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  or permission of instructor.
    Not offered every semester.

  
  • ENG 116 - Life Writing

    3 credits

    Over the last three centuries, life writing has emerged as a dominant literary genre in western culture and has taken a variety of forms, including autobiographies, memoirs, personal essays, diaries, and journals. This course is designed for students who are interested in writing self-narratives and wish to expand their writing and creativity skills through self-expression. Assignments for the course will include guided written assignments, self-directed projects, peer workshops, and various autobiographical readings.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research .
  
  • ENG 128 - Modern English Structure and Usage

    3 credits


    A descriptive introduction to the structure of American English grammar and syntax in common usage. Topics include English morphology, word classes, phrases, clauses, and sentence structure. No prior linguistic knowledge assumed. Can be native or non-native speakers of English. Students interested in linguistics, translation, writing, teaching English as a Second Language, or teaching writing should consider taking this course.

     

    Prerequisites:  English 101-Ready  
    Spring Only

 

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