May 30, 2024  
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog 
    
Fall 2021 - Summer 2022 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Students should consult with their curriculum chair or counselor when selecting courses to satisfy program requirements. Please note: The honors versions of courses satisfy the same requirements as the non-honors versions.

 

Music

  
  
  
  • MUSIC 145A - Applied Music — Percussion 1

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of percussion. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the vast literature on percussive instruments. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance.

    Notes: An additional fee per semester is required.

  
  • MUSIC 145B - Applied Music — Percussion 2

    1 credits

    Percussion 2 is for students enrolled in their second consecutive semester of individual instruction in percussion. This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of percussion. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the vast literature on percussive instruments. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance. An additional fee per semester is required.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 145A Applied Music — Percussion 1 .
  
  
  
  • MUSIC 146A - Applied Music — Guitar 1

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of the guitar. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance.

    Notes: An additional fee per semester is required.

  
  
  
  
  • MUSIC 147A - Applied Music — Brass 1

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of a selected brass instrument. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance. An additional fee per semester is required.

  
  
  • MUSIC 147C - Applied Music — Brass 3

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of wind instruments. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance. An additional fee per semester is required.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 147B Applied Music — Brass 2 .

  
  • MUSIC 147D - Applied Music — Brass 4

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in the performance techniques and literature of wind instruments. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation, familiarity with the performance approaches and the study of the instrument’s vast literature. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in technical skills and repertoire through performance. An additional fee per semester is required.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 147C Applied Music — Brass 3 .

  
  • MUSIC 148A - Applied Music — Composition 1

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in compositional techniques, methods, and forms widely used throughout Western music. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation in harmonic and melodic systems, and form. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in the techniques and forms studied throughout the semester by producing complete scores and/or performances.

    Notes: An additional fee per semester is required.

  
  
  • MUSIC 148C - Applied Music — Composition 3

    1 credits

    This course provides individual instruction in compositional techniques, methods, and forms widely used throughout Western music. Emphasis is placed on the development of a sound technical foundation in harmonic and melodic systems, and form. Upon successful completion, students will be able to demonstrate proficiency in the techniques and forms studied throughout the semester by producing complete scores and/or performances.

    Notes: An additional fee per semester is required. This course is for students enrolled in their third consecutive semester of individual instruction in composition.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 148B Applied Music — Composition 2 .
  
  
  • MUSIC 150 - Music Appreciation 1

    3 credits

    Introduction to music literature of the Baroque and Classic periods with emphasis on listening, correlated with textbook material and supplementary reading.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • MUSIC 160 - Introduction to Audio 1

    3 credits

    This course covers basic audio concepts, including the physics of sound, an historical overview of sound reproduction, and an examination of analog and digital sound recording technology and equipment, including microphones, multi-track recording, mixing, effects, digital audio workstations, and computer software for sound design and editing. Students also complete hands-on projects using digital workstations.

  
  • MUSIC 161 - Introduction to MIDI Technology 1

    3 credits

    Musical Instrument Digital Interface is the marriage of music and computer technology. Students learn concepts, basic theory and techniques and the application of MIDI technology to the production of music. Hands-on projects are completed using MIDI keyboard synthesizers and sequencer software.

    Pre or Corequisites: MUSIC 102 - History of Electronic Music  

  
  • MUSIC 162 - Introduction to MIDI Technology 2

    3 credits

    This course is a continuation of Introduction to MIDI Tech 1, consisting of more advanced concepts in MIDI technology and its appreciation in music composition, recording, and arranging. Hands-on projects develop additional skills in MIDI sequencing, effects, tape-less recording, and synchronization, sound synthesis and synthesizer programming.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 161 Intro to MIDI Technology 1.
  
  • MUSIC 163 - Electronic Music Composition

    3 credits

    An introduction to the tools and processes used in composing music with electronic instruments. The special requirements for composing electronic music and MIDI based music for film, video, multimedia, and computer games are covered.

    Prerequisites: Suggested MUSIC 160 Introduction to Audio 1  and/or MUSIC 161 Introduction to MIDI Technology 1 .
  
  • MUSIC 165 - Recording Engineering 1

    3 credits

    A hands-on course designed to establish working skills in various areas of audio production. Areas covered include basic audio theory, audio tape recorders (both analog and digital), microphones, consoles, mixing, audiotape editing, concert and studio recording.

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 160 Introduction to Audio 1 .
  
  • MUSIC 167 - Live Sound Engineering 1

    3 credits

    This course will provide students with hands on experience as sound engineers in live performance settings. Students will learn all of the components of a sound system and sound enhancing equipment, including proper set up and maintenance of equipment. Students will gain experience in “tuning” a performance space, and running a soundboard during a live performance.

  
  
  
  • MUSIC 222 - Guitar Class 3

    1 credits

    Study of the guitar in solo and ensemble combinations. Materials of performance geared to abilities of students. Students must supply their own guitar.

    Offered spring and fall semesters.
  
  • MUSIC 223 - Guitar Class 4

    1 credits

    Study of the guitar in solo and ensemble combinations. Materials of performance geared to abilities of students. Students must supply their own guitar.

    Offered spring and fall semesters.
  
  
  
  
  
  • MUSIC 265 - Recording Engineering 2

    3 credits

    A hands-on course designed to establish working skills in various areas of audio production. Areas covered include basic audio theory, audio tape recorders (both analog and digital), microphones, consoles, mixing, audiotape editing, concert and studio recording. Recording Engineering 2 continues acquisition of the skills developed in MUSIC 165 Recording Engineering 1 .

    Prerequisites: MUSIC 165 Recording Engineering 1 .

Nursing

  
  • ADN 120 - ADN-Nursing 1, Fundamentals of Nursing (and Lab, and Clinical Study)

    8 credits

    This beginner-level course will introduce the student to the foundations, basic principles, and practices of nursing. Health needs will be introduced and discussed at length. These needs are present in clients throughout their life-span. Emphasis will be placed on the implementation of the nursing process in the delivery of care and the development of beginning clinical skills. Concepts related to the health/illness continuum are introduced as the student begins to participate in client-nurse relationships. The professional, caring, and ethical delivery of proper nursing practice will be stressed. Students will begin to examine their own feelings as they become active contributors in the nursing process.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors.

    Corequisite: BIOL 121 - Anatomy and Physiology 1 (and Lab) , NURSE 102 - Dosage Calculations for Nurses  and  ENG 101 - Writing and Research .
    Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to students accepted into the ADN program.
    Offered spring and fall semesters.
  
  
  
  • ADN 231 - ADN-Nursing 4 (and Clinical Study)

    12 credits

    Consideration of complex health problems of adults and children; opportunity provided for students to care for adults and children in acute care facilities. Principles of advanced pathophysiology, pharmacology, and leadership are integrated. Seminars focus on preparation for entry-level into the profession.

    Notes: May be taken for Honors credit.

    Prerequisites: Completion of course ADN 221 ADN-Nursing 3 (and Lab, and Clinical Study)  with a grade of “C+” or better. 
    Pre or Corequisites: NUTR 101 - Foundations of Nutrition  or NUTR 109 - Nutrition for Health Care 

    Offered spring and fall semesters.
  
  • NURSE 102 - Dosage Calculations for Nurses

    1 credits


    This course offers a simplified approach to calculation and administration of drug dosages, including theoretical and mathematical concepts related to the administration of medications. A step-by-step approach to dosage calculations, including IV, is utilized. Competence in basic math is necessary and is evaluated at first session. This course is appropriate for those considering or already working in a health career. Licensed health professionals may enroll in this course as a review for re-entry into the work force.

    Prerequisites: Course is restricted to students enrolled in the Nursing A.A.S. degree.

    Student must be “college level” math-ready. 
    Offered spring and fall semesters.


Paralegal

  
  • PRLGL 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies

    3 credits

    A prerequisite to all paralegal classes, this course provides students with a historical and sociological perspective of the law. The methods and processes of judicial, administrative and legislative branches of government as they relate to the legal assistant are studied. The basic terminology and procedures of the legal system in New York are covered. An introduction to legal research assists students in analyzing cases, writing briefs, and making presentations. Ethical standards of the law profession are included.

  
  • PRLGL 102 - Legal Research & Writing

    3 credits

    This course introduces paralegals to methods of finding the law applicable to a specific legal issue. Students learn legal research principles; the types of law books used in research, their scope, citation methods; interpreting case and statutory law as well as other legal authority and annotations. Students learn to use government publications. In all areas of research, students are required to organize legal research and findings and present their ideas in written and oral format. This course involves intensive legal writing.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
  
  • PRLGL 104 - Family Law

    3 credits

    This course prepares the prospective paralegal to assist attorneys in the practice of marriage law and preparation of documents related to the most common legal aspects of marriage. Marriage relationships, legal problems with children, dissolution of marriage, custody, legitimacy, adoption, guardianship, and support agreements are studied. Students write the most common legal agreements and marriage/family related documents.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • PRLGL 105 - Administrative Law

    3 credits

    A skills course in Administrative Law set in the theoretical, historical and political context of the development of administrative agencies in the United States in the twentieth Century. Emphasis will be placed on distinguishing administrative from civil and criminal law, learning specific administrative processes and procedures including judicial review, incorporating relevant ethical standards of paralegal and legal practices and honing case and appellate brief-writing ability.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 - Introduction to Paralegal Studies  
  
  • PRLGL 106 - Litigation

    3 credits

    Students are introduced to the use of litigation as the process for resolving disputes through the court system. In addition to an overview of the litigation process, students learn the court procedures involved with litigation and methods by which paralegals assist attorneys in the process. This course involves intensive legal writing. Students complete a portfolio of legal documents related to litigation.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • PRLGL 108 - Partnership and Corporation

    3 credits

    This course explores laws which pertain to business form and structure. Primary attention is directed to different legal types of partnership forms as well as legal corporate structures. Students learn to prepare the legal documentation needed to form, maintain, and dissolve the primary legal entities of business.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • PRLGL 110 - Estates, Wills, Trusts

    3 credits

    This course prepares the prospective paralegal to prepare legal documents related to the planning and administration of trusts, the administering of estates, and asset distribution. Topics covered in depth include wills, probate and taxes. Students learn to prepare legal documents most commonly related to these topics, such as wills, petitions for probate, citations, waivers, notice of probate, and probate attorney’s affidavit.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • PRLGL 112 - Torts & Investigation

    3 credits

    This course provides paralegals with an introduction to the general nature of tort law and allows for the specific analysis of intentional and other torts. Students prepare Office Memorandum of Law in conformity with the requirements of such memoranda. Students also prepare a Complaint and Bill of Particulars based on provided fact patterns.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • PRLGL 114 - Real Property Law

    3 credits

    This course provides basic knowledge of real property law, its concepts, its principles, and the government regulations regarding real property. Students learn to use the documents and forms utilized in closings on houses, cooperatives, and condominiums. Students learn to draft most of the documents needed in a real estate closing. Students may participate in a mock closing at the end of each semester.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • PRLGL 115 - Criminal Law for Paralegals

    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to criminal law and procedure for paralegals. Emphasis is placed on practical aspects of prosecuting and defending criminal law cases. For example, students learn procedural steps from arrest to trial, but, attention is also given to the nature and origins of criminal law and the role of crime in American society today. The student learns legal terminology, case analysis and briefing and continues to develop writing skills.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • PRLGL 116 - Computer Applications for the Law Office

    3 credits

    Students develop the conceptual, technical, and interpersonal skills required to apply technology and principles of management and supervision to manage information and personnel in an automated law office environment. Course includes hands-on experience with word processing, database, spreadsheet, PowerPoint, and law specific software.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
  
  • PRLGL 117 - Immigration Law

    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to immigration law and policy in an historical and constitutional context with emphasis on paralegal skills training and practice. It covers the categorization of immigrants and non-immigrants, admission and deportations procedures, asylum and refugees, and citizenship. A major component of the course is the application of knowledge to specific legal issues, real and hypothetical.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies . Offered summer semester.
  
  • PRLGL 118 - Paralegal Internship

    3 credits

    This course provides students with an opportunity to apply their paralegal theory and skills in an actual legal setting, working eight hours per week and completing a portfolio which describes what has been learned. A faculty mentor monitors the work experience.

    Prerequisites: Permission of the Curriculum or Department Chair to register for this course.
  
  • PRLGL 119 - Medical Malpractice for Paralegals

    3 credits

    This is an introductory course in the specialty field of Medical Malpractice. It combines health sciences and paralegal backgrounds in an attempt to enhance the skills of students in both fields. The class covers basic tort law with medical malpractice litigation. Emphasis is placed on substantive knowledge of law and medicine with skills of legal research and medical record reading. A major component of the course is the application of knowledge to specific legal issues, real, and hypothetical.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies  or permission of Curriculum Chair.
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • PRLGL 120 - Health Care Law

    3 credits

    This is an introductory course in the specialty field of Health Care Law. The student learns how legal and social institutions interact with life and death issues. Areas of study include legal problems of the elderly and mental health, AIDS and the law, health care financial and delivery systems, federal vs. state law, the privatization of health care facilities, and the marketing of health care providers. The course also focuses on the ethical questions of health care and public policy.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies  or permission of Curriculum Chair.
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • PRLGL 121 - Elder Law

    3 credits

    This is an introductory course in the growing field of Elder Law, which focuses on the legal and financial implications of aging. Legal areas such as estate planning and probate, age discrimination, durable powers of attorney, right-to-die issues, trusts, disability planning, elder abuse, guardianship, fraud, Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid are covered. The student learns how legal and social institutions interact with life and death issues. Particular attention is paid to ethical questions and the intersection of law and public policy in defining and meeting the needs of the elderly.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Not offered every semester.
  
  • PRLGL 122 - Intellectual Property

    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to intellectual property law and policy in a national and international context with emphasis on paralegal skills training and practice. It covers the areas of trademark, copyright, and patent law with special emphasis on the most recent legislation in the United States and the United Nations and on the impact of technology. A major component of the course is the application of knowledge to specific legal issues, real and hypothetical.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Offered summer semester.
  
  • PRLGL 124 - Contracts & Contract Administration

    3 credits

    This course explores laws which pertain to contracts, contract formation and their enforcement. Primary attention is focused on different methods of forming contracts, typical key provisions of common commercial agreements, negotiation and drafting of same and administration of such contracts once executed. Students learn to negotiate and draft commonly negotiated provisions, complete certain UCC documentation, create and use checklists and prepare contract summaries.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .
    Offered fall semester.
  
  • PRLGL 125 - Evidence Law for Paralegals

    3 credits

    This course is an in-depth look at the rules of evidence. Both Federal and State law will be reviewed. Subjects include competency of witnesses, hearsay and its exceptions, expert and lay opinion testimony, privileged communications, relevancy, procedural considerations, judicial notice, burden of proof, presumptions, form and type of objections, authentication, the best evidence rule and the use of demonstrative and scientific evidence.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .

  
  
  • PRLGL 127 - E-Discovery for Paralegals

    3 credits

    Students are introduced to the legal, technical, and practical elements of modern e-discovery. Subjects include: data collection, preservation review and production, relevant case law and rules, the language of e-discovery and the Electronic Discovery Reference Model. Students will learn technical skills related to document production and project cost analysis.

    Prerequisites: PRLGL 101 Introduction to Paralegal Studies .

Philosophy

  
  • PHIL 101 - Philosophy Ancient/Medieval

    3 credits

    This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic directions and problems of early western philosophical thought, particularly in the areas of epistemology and metaphysics. Starting with the pre-Socratics, through Socrates, Plato and Aristotle, this course concludes with study and comparison of the systems of Augustine and Aquinas.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research 

  
  • PHIL 102 - Philosophy/Modern

    3 credits

    This course is designed to acquaint the students with the continental rationalists Descartes, Leibniz and Spinoza. It contrasts their assumptions and methods with those of the British rationalists Locke, Berkley and Hume. The course concludes with attempts by Kant and by the American pragmatists to synthesize these divergent views.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • PHIL 111 - Philosophy of Love

    3 credits

    This course provides an introduction to the philosophy of love by considering six fundamental and general ways to look at love: erotic love, love of God, romantic love, moral love, love a power, and mutual love. These six approaches will be critically examined with the help of a variety of Western thinkers from various time periods such as Sappho, Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Hobbes, Kant, Kierkegaard, Freud, Sartre, de Beauvoir, Firestone, Scruton, Nussbaum, and Irigaray. The course aims to put us in a better position to understand the nature of love and how it relates to a wide spectrum of topics including friendship, sex, morality, religion, truth, selfhood, science, and politics. It aims to help us grasp various troubling things closely associated with love and/or its denial such as sexism, racism, sadism, masochism, hate, and death.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research 
  
  • PHIL 150 - Applied Logic

    3 credits

    This course is an introduction to the principles and methods of logical thinking. Topics included are language and logic, formal and informal logic, logical fallacies, critical thinking and an introduction to symbolic logic.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  
  
  • PHIL 160 - Ethics

    3 credits

    This course explores moral philosophy through the classic writings of such thinkers as Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Hobbes, Hume, Kant, Mill, and Sartre. Through these, and many other contemporary readings, students are introduced to the major ethical theories of utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics, natural law theory, social contract theory, egoism, and relativism. Students also learn to what extent these theories may be compatible and in what areas they are in opposition. The theories studied in the first half of the semester are then applied to a variety of contemporary moral conflicts including abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, environmental issues, stem cell research, cloning, genetics, terrorism, and a variety of global issues.

    Pre or Corequisites: Prerequisite: English 101-Ready  or Corequisite: ENG 101 - Writing and Research  

  
  • PHIL 161H - Seminar in Ethics-Honors

    3 credits

    This discussion based seminar explores, through works of philosophy and literature, the nature and meaning of good and evil.  In exploring goodness, we will consider a set of philosophical theories (natural law theory, consequentialism, Kantian ethics, social contract theory, intuitionism, and virtue ethics) and then apply them to a variety of psychological, sociological, political and theological issues with the help of Plato’s masterpiece The Republic.

    Prerequisites: Student must be ENG 101 -ready.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • PHIL 201H - Philosophy of Art-Honors

    3 credits

    What is art? And what makes aesthetic judgments possible? This course addresses these two questions by looking at what some of the most influential Western Philosophers (Plato, Aristotle, Plotinus, Augustine, Ficino, Shaftesbury, Kant, Schelling, Hegel, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Croce, Dewey, and Heidegger) have said about art and aesthetics. Particular attention is given to how philosophical issues in art have been intimately connected to philosophical visions of the cosmos, god, politics, science, and ethics. Such connections are investigated both through theory and through the critique of famous works of art in various mediums.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101 - Writing and Research .

Physical Education — Combined Health, Fitness & Sports

Physical Education credits can be earned by taking courses that begin with the prefixes PEC, PEH, PES, and DANCE.

  
  • PE 110 - Health and Fitness for Life

    2 credits

    This course will emphasize the development and reinforcement of behaviors that contribute to optimum health and fitness throughout life. Students will analyze their health/fitness status and develop prescriptions for positive lifestyle changes, learn to identify risk factors associated with chronic diseases, understand how to develop a lifelong plan for physical fitness, and understand the basic concepts of nutrition and weight management.

  
  • PE 136 - Fitness - Soccer

    1 credits

    Students will learn the basic rules and fundamentals of soccer, and will improve their fitness level. Soccer is played in most countries and is considered the most popular sport in the world.

  
  • PE 137 - Fitness - Softball

    1 credits

    Students will learn the basic fundamentals of softball and will play in a softball league. When students improve their skills, they will enjoy the game more and will feel a sense of accomplishment. Exercise can become part of a healthy lifestyle through participation in a softball league.

  
  • PE 138 - Fitness - Tennis

    1 credits

  
  • PE 139 - Fitness - Volleyball

    1 credits

    Volleyball is a great sport that can be enjoyed by players of all ages and skill levels. You will learn the basic rules and fundamental skills to play at the college level. Aside from the pure enjoyment of the game, volleyball has many social and physical fitness benefits.

  
  • PE 140 - Fitness - Golf

    1 credits

    Students will learn golf vocabulary and etiquette. Instruction will emphasize: grip, stance and learning to hit with woods, irons and a putter. Golf is a fun, social game that takes place in a friendly, beautiful environment; it gives players a chance to socialize, network and meet other people.

  
  • PE 142 - Fitness - Badminton

    1 credits

    Badminton is an Olympic sport. In this course, you will learn the fundamental skills to play singles and doubles. Basic techniques are easy to learn, yet practice and concentration are required to perfect the skill needed to become a good badminton player.

  
  • PE 143 - Fitness - Basketball

    1 credits

    Students will learn the basic rules and fundamentals of basketball, and will improve their fitness level. Basketball is played in most countries and is considered the most popular sport in the world.

  
  • PE 158 - Introduction to PE Activities

    1 credits

    The student will learn methods to develop a healthy and physically fit body, with emphasis on increasing endurance, strength and health awareness. This course provides students with a basic background in various team, individual sport and fitness activities. Students will learn basic rules, terminology and fundamentals in sports such as badminton, tennis and volleyball.

    Offered every semester.

Physical Education — Health and Fitness

Physical Education credits can be earned by taking courses that begin with the prefixes PEC, PEH, PES, and DANCE. With the exception of Jazz Aerobics, all of our dance courses can also be taken for strictly Humanities credit. To receive strictly Humanities credit for a dance course, look for a matching course title under the DANCE prefix and use that course number when you register.

  
  • PE 109 - Lifeguarding/First Aid/CPR/AED

    2 credits

    The lifeguarding course teaches the skills needed to help prevent and respond to aquatic emergencies. Professional lifeguards are responsible for the lives and safety of people who are participating in a variety of aquatic activities. Upon successful completion of this course, students receive an American Red Cross certification.

  
  • PE 111 - Learn to Swim

    1 credits

    This course will teach rhythmic breathing and stroke development (front crawl, breaststroke, backstroke, and sidestroke). Goals of this course include: improving student’s swim skills, self-confidence, self esteem, and to make swimming a lifetime activity.

  
  • PE 112 - Independent Study - Health & Sports for Life

    2 credits

    This course is designed to challenge students to be actively involved in the learning process by constatnly assessing how the information affects lifestyle from a personal perspective. The emphasis is on self-responsibility for developing and reinforcing behaviros that contribute to optimum health and wellness. Students will analyze their lifestyle behaviors and develop prescriptions for lifestyle changes that will have a postiive impact on their lives. The sport component is devised for both the physcially challenged and physically active individual. Students will explore and develop an understanding of the nature of a variety of sports and become educated spectators. They will be able to identify the wellness benefits derived from sports participationi and gain an appreciation for the aesthetics of sports.

    Notes: Independent Study.

  
  • PE 113 - Swimming for Fitness

    1 credits

    This course will improve your swimming skills and individual physical fitness through drills and increased distance swims. Upon achieving improved swim techniques and endurance, the student will also be exposed to a variety of water sports and leisure time activities.

  
  • PE 116 - First Aid/CPR/AED

    1 credits

    This is an American Heart Association certification course. Students will receive a two-year certification in BLS for Healthcare Providers and Heartsaver First Aid. Students will learn professional CPR with the use of an AE and the fundamentals of first aid. This is an essential course for individuals in the following fields: health care, criminal justice, education, radiology, dietetic, chemical dependency and nursing.

  
  • PE 121 - Beginning Judo

    1 credits

    Students will learn the importance of Judo and how it gives you an advantage in self-defense. Students will learn: to understand Judo, its rules and etiquette and skills to lift and throw your opponent. Students will develop better overall fitness through strength and cardiovascular exercises.

  
  • PE 130 - Health Essentials

    1 credits

    Students will be able to identify lifestyle behaviors and risk factors which have direct impact on their overall health and well being. The importance of creating a balance between the sub-dimensions of wellness: emotional, intellectual, physical, social, occupational, and environmental will be explored.

  
  • PE 218 - Exercise and Conditioning

    1 credits

    Students will develop an understanding of: the principles of exercise and conditioning, techniques and philosophies of weight training, and program design. The course includes the use of cardiovascular equipment, traditional free weights and exercise machines. The safe use of equipment and spotting techniques will be demonstrated and discussed.

  
  • PEH 122 - Elementary Modern Dance 1

    3 credits

    Designed to develop students’ awareness of the basic concepts and vocabulary of modern dance as a basis for the appreciation of modern dance, for aesthetic satisfaction, for physical well-being, and for performance. During the course, students learn basic locomotive and non-locomotive steps and combinations. They also become familiar with the philosophical and artistic contributions of the forerunners and pioneers of modern dance. There are some written, reading, and dance assignments. Students learn and perform a short modern dance with other members of the class.

  
  • PEH 123 - Latin Dance 1

    1 credits

    Merengue and Salsa steps are used to teach the fundamentals of movement and social dancing principals. The primary focus is mastery of basic steps and partnering. The social and historical context of these forms is also covered. All students participate in an end-of-semester performance utilizing material covered. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort and progress assessed through written and reading assignments, written and practical quizzes, classroom participation and the final performance.

    Notes: Formerly: Intro to Merengue and Salsa. Take for 1 Humanities or 1 PEH credit.

    Offered spring semester
  
  • PEH 124 - Elementary Modern Dance 2

    3 credits

    A continuation of DANCE 101 Elementary Modern Dance 1 . Basic concepts and movement vocabulary are reviewed, and students then continue to strengthen technique and aesthetic awareness by introduction of new and more demanding movement patterns, improvisations, and movement assignments paced and geared to the Elementary 2 level. There are some writing, reading, and dance assignments. Elementary 2 students study the philosophical and artistic combinations of the second generation and the avant-garde.
     

    Prerequisites: DANCE 101 Elementary Modern Dance 1 , or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
    Offered fall and spring semesters, evenings only.
  
  • PEH 125 - Broadway Jazz

    1 credits

    This course provides a dance experiences designed to develop the student’s awareness of the basic principles classic jazz dance. The class will learn and perform a simple jazz dance. The course includes video and live performance viewings, short reading and written assignments that put student’s physical experience into historical and social context. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort, progress, assignments, and exams.

    Offered spring and fall semesters and Summer Session 1.
  
  • PEH 126 - Hip Hop 1

    1 credits

    The course covers the fundamentals of dance technique focusing on various styles of Hop Hop. Students learn proper body placement, coordination, and timing as well as explore their individuality and personal style. The social and historical context of the form is also explored. All students participate in an end-of-semester performance utilizing material covered. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort and progress assessed through written and reading assignments, written and practical quizzes, classroom participation and the final performance.

  
  • PEH 128 - Elementary Ballet

    3 credits

    Movement experiences presenting the fundamentals of classical ballet in order to develop understanding of and skills in the basic ballet vocabulary. Includes an overview of ballet history and a written and/or dance assignment. Students learn and perform a short ballet dance with other members of the class.
     

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • PEH 132 - Contemporary Jazz

    3 credits

    The course is designed to teach basic principles and beginning skills of the jazz idiom. It also introduces students to the contemporary nuances and current trends in the dance discipline. The course includes short written assignments and video viewings. The class will learn and perform a simple contemporary jazz dance. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort, progress, assignments, and exams.

    Offered fall and spring semesters.
  
  • PEH 133 - Latin Dance 2

    1 credits

    This advanced-beginner level course builds on DANCE 112 Latin Dance 1 /PEH 123 Latin Dance 1 . The fundamental steps of Salsa and Merengue are assembled in more complex combinations. Bachata and Rumba are also introduced. The social and historical context of these forms is also covered. All students participate in an end-of-semester performance utilizing material covered. Grading is based on attendance, skills, effort and progress assessed through written and reading assignments, written and practical quizzes, classroom participation and the final performance.

    Notes: Take for 1 Humanities or 1 PEH credit.

    Prerequisites: DANCE 112 Latin Dance 1 /PEH 123 Latin Dance 1  (Formerly Intro to Merenge and Salsa).
  
  • PEH 134 - Choreography & Dance Performance Combined

    3 credits

    Provides training in basic choreographic skills. Working in both traditional and non-traditional ways, students concentrate on the development of original forms and structures and learn the art of making their own dances.

    Prerequisites: Students must have previous technical training in dance.
    Offered spring semester.
  
  • PEH 135 - Jazz Dance Workshop

    1 credits

    A continuation of DANCE 121 Contemporary Jazz . Basic principles of movement and jazz techniques and steps are reviewed. Students then continue to strengthen their techniques and aesthetic awareness by introduction of many new and more demanding combinations and movement assignments geared to an advanced beginning level. There are some written, reading, and dance assignments. The class learns and performs a jazz dance.

    Prerequisites: DANCE 121 Contemporary Jazz  or previous formal training in dance, modern jazz or ballet.
    Offered spring selester.
  
  • PEH 146 - Jazz Aerobics

    1 credits

    Exercise course which includes warm-up and stretches leading to a non-impact aerobic workout in the jazz dance style followed by a cool-down and relaxation period. Students learn and apply the principles of aerobic exercise. They learn and demonstrate a short portion of the class work.

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • PEH 150 - Independent Study in Dance Performance

    3 credits

    Students rehearse and perform a minimum of two dances as part of DanceWorks, the college dance company, and attend company classes. Involves a yearlong commitment to rehearsals, Saturday classes, and all performances. Open by audition, permission of the company director and dance faculty consultant, as well as enrollment in or successful completion of Westchester Community College dance courses at appropriate level.

    Notes: Registration may be in fall or spring, but work must span both semesters.

  
  • PEH 176 - Movement Improvisation

    1 credits

    Movement improvisation is a class that expands the student’s movement vocabulary and understanding of physical language through a variety of problem-solving exercises. These exercises encourage students to discover new ways of thinking about time, space, dynamics, text, and sound. By solving the exploration problems, the student spontaneously discovers new approaches to the creative process. Grading is based in attendance, skills effort, progress, assignments, and exams. 

    Offered fall semester.
  
  • PEH 216 - Aerobic Exercise

    1 credits

    This course provides students with a basic understanding of the principles of aerobic exercise and its affect on cardio-respiratory fitness. Discussion will include lung efficiency, cardiac function, energy production, gender, age, training status and genetic makeup. Students will increase their aerobic fitness through participation in aerobic exercise activities throughout the course. 


Physical Education — Sports

Physical Education credits can be earned by taking courses that begin with the prefixes PEC, PEH, PES, and DANCE.

  
  • PE 101 - Intro to Bowling - League Play

    1 credits

    Bowling is one of the most popular recreational sports. In this course, students will learn to keep score and how to improve their skills, fundamentals and techniques. Students will be bowling in a college league and will be encouraged to bowl on our college team.

  
  • PE 104 - Badminton - Tennis

    1 credits

    This course combines two very popular recreational activities. Students will learn the basic fundamentals, rules, regulations and playing etiquette of each sport. Being knowledgeable about the game allows students to better understand the strategies and tactics that are used in single and doubles play.

 

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